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Is this the reason the FBI raided Bob Lazar ?

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Piney

It was the Thallium.  The element 115 was long proven a B.S. story by the discovery of the real 115.

https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Robert_Lazar

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Desertrat56

Oh, good lord, this guy has a new story of the FBI and other agencies raiding his home every time he moves to a new area.  In the 90's it was the FBI, an imaginary SWAT team, and 3 different military groups swooping down and circling with helicopters, holding him and his wife hostage while they went through his house and seized his computer equipment.  At the time he claimed to live in the mountains of Central New Mexico which is rural and has barely a volunteer fire department, much less a  SWAT team.  The man has a lot of stories and none of them are true except that he did live in Los Alamos for a short time and worked at the lab as a janitor for a few weeks.  He isn't even old enough to have done the things he claims he has done.  Not to mention no one he claims to be able to prove his education exists.

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AstralHorus

If Epstein didnt kill himself, I believe bob. :ph34r:

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OverSword
10 hours ago, Piney said:

He sure gets a lot of high profile attention for bull crap don’t you think? Don’t be sure that his story is a complete farce. I’m not saying he worked on alien craft, although he may have believed that to be the case, but nut job liars or delusional people usually don’t get the amount of official attention he seems to have attracted over the years. Hell, even you haven’t got that level of attention from the feds and out of all the people here you should qualify most. :D

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Hankenhunter

I'd be interested in seeing the official results of the police raid on his company property. Did they find out where the poison came from. From the link.

During filming of the documentary however, his firm - United Nuclear Scientific - was the subject of a raid by the FBI and local police, leading to speculation that authorities had been attempting to locate samples of Element 115 that Lazar may have acquired during his time at Area 51.

Now according to reports written by Michigan State Police Sergeant Detective Thomas Rajala, the search was actually related to an investigation into the death of 31-year-old Janel Struzl who was believed to have been poisoned by thallium sulfate - a highly toxic substance.

While Lazar himself is not a suspect in the case, it is understood that the raid was designed to determine who may have previously purchased thallium from United Nuclear Scientific. Seems odd. Why didnt they just ask? 
  

So there actually was a raid. Did the police find any thalium? I'm not proclaiming that he's legit, rather that the back ground to this "raid" is awfully shaky from an official standpoint. Theres more, but I'm going to do some digging. This intrigues me for some reason. :ph34r:

 

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Piney
8 hours ago, OverSword said:

He sure gets a lot of high profile attention for bull crap don’t you think? Don’t be sure that his story is a complete farce. I’m not saying he worked on alien craft, although he may have believed that to be the case, but nut job liars or delusional people usually don’t get the amount of official attention he seems to have attracted over the years. Hell, even you haven’t got that level of attention from the feds and out of all the people here you should qualify most. :D

He has a unlicensed chemistry shop that's just screaming  "homeland security me".

.....and I'm staying out of trouble. :unsure2:

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Desertrat56
11 hours ago, OverSword said:

He sure gets a lot of high profile attention for bull crap don’t you think? Don’t be sure that his story is a complete farce. I’m not saying he worked on alien craft, although he may have believed that to be the case, but nut job liars or delusional people usually don’t get the amount of official attention he seems to have attracted over the years. Hell, even you haven’t got that level of attention from the feds and out of all the people here you should qualify most. :D

Yeah, I was on that craft and he wasn't there. 

The high profile people he gets attention from are all attention seekers that make a lot of money off him and all their other "experiencers".  They are not any more reputable than Bob Lazarr  (TTSA??   George Noory? )  And the one who seemed to have some reputation, John Lear, has claimed Bob is a liar and has distanced himself.  And even his reputation is strange and questionable.

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy

Since element 115 have a half life of 0,65 seconds he would have had to steal a truly massive amount.

While element 115 was unknown when Lazar started pushing his story, by now it have been discovered and it shows none of the properties he claimed it would. Its official name is Moscovium.

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OverSword
8 hours ago, Piney said:

He has a unlicensed chemistry shop that's just screaming  "homeland security me".

.....and I'm staying out of trouble. :unsure2:

Unlicensed chemistry shop?

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OverSword
1 hour ago, Noteverythingisaconspiracy said:

Since element 115 have a half life of 0,65 seconds he would have had to steal a truly massive amount.

While element 115 was unknown when Lazar started pushing his story, by now it have been discovered and it shows none of the properties he claimed it would. Its official name is Moscovium.

How are elements categorized by number, that fictional element 115 as described by Lazar must have the properties of the actual 115? By your comment I assume there must be some convention in place?

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Piney
15 minutes ago, OverSword said:

Unlicensed chemistry shop?

Quote

 he runs United Nuclear, one of the very few chemical supply houses still supplying as many unrestricted chemicals as possible to amateur chemists. Make of him what you will, but if you need fifty feet of magnesium ribbon, a neodymium magnet the size of a brick (for, I don't know, wiping credit cards from ten feet away?), or a jar of heavy water, he's your best source.

https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Robert_Lazar

 

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Piney
1 minute ago, OverSword said:

that fictional element 115 as described by Lazar must have the properties of the actual 115?

Nope......

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy
11 minutes ago, OverSword said:

How are elements categorized by number, that fictional element 115 as described by Lazar must have the properties of the actual 115? By your comment I assume there must be some convention in place?

Elements are categorized by their number of protons. Element 115 have 115 protons, hydrogen have just 1. Isotopes are categorized by their total number of protons and neutrons. This why we can have both uranium235 and uranium238, the latter have three more neutrons but the same number of protons.

The thing about the real element 115 is that it have an extremely short lifetime. It have a half life of 0,65 seconds, which means that after 0,65 seconds half of it have changed into another element and 0,65 seconds later half of the remainder have done the same... and so on, so it doesn't take long until you have nothing left. How do you use such a material for anything usefull ?

Edited by Noteverythingisaconspiracy
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OverSword
34 minutes ago, Piney said:

Maybe that crazy Canadian guy that was working on anti gravity orders from him :D

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OverSword
37 minutes ago, Noteverythingisaconspiracy said:

Elements are categorized by their number of protons. Element 115 have 115 protons, hydrogen have just 1. Isotopes are categorized by their total number of protons and neutrons. This why we can have both uranium235 and uranium238, the latter have three more neutrons but the same number of protons.

The thing about the real element 115 is that it have an extremely short lifetime. It have a half life of 0,65 seconds, which means that after 0,65 seconds half of it have changed into another element and 0,65 seconds later half of the remainder have done the same... and so on, so it doesn't take long until you have nothing left. How do you use such a material for anything usefull ?

Never mind. Forgot all that stuff. A quick google and reading a sentence refreshed my memory 

Edited by OverSword

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OverSword
44 minutes ago, Piney said:

Nope......

Yes. I think you misunderstood my question.

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy
14 minutes ago, OverSword said:

Okay but my real question there can only be one element with that name? Anything with that number of protons will be that? Excuse my ignorance I’m not even sure what a proton is anymore I’ll look it up. 

There can be only one element with any specific number. Currently we have 94 naturally occurent elements and around 20 that only exists in the laboratory. Element 115 belong to the latter group.

In theory there is no limit to the number of elements, but anything larger than plutonium (Element 94) is incredibly unstable.

Edited by Noteverythingisaconspiracy
Edit: When I wrote around 20 I obviously meant 24. Until a new one is discovered, then I meant 25.. and so on.
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Piney
1 minute ago, OverSword said:

Yes. I think you misunderstood my question.

Quote

Long before Moscovium was synthesized, and assigned the number 115 on the periodic table of elements, Lazar claimed it was capable of powering anti-gravity engines. Some people feel this vindicates Lazar (and proves the rest of his kooky claims). However, for Bob Lazar to be right, virtually all of modern atomic physics would need to be wrong:

Unfortunately, the very method of his apparent vindication – that element 115 had finally been created – directly contradicts a key claim that Bob Lazar made: Ununpentium cannot be synthesized in a lab. That it must be found in naturally occurring deposits that can only be made in high-mass star systems.[18]

Claims of stable isotopes of element 115 are unlikely according to our knowledge of nuclear physics: in particular, the predicted Island of stabilityWikipedia's W.svg and known magic numbersWikipedia's W.svg. Magic numbers as we know them are always even numbers; therefore, it is very unlikely (admittedly not impossible) to have stable heavy elements with odd numbers of protons.

https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Robert_Lazar#Element_115

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy
11 minutes ago, OverSword said:

Never mind. Forgot all that stuff. A quick google and reading a sentence refreshed my memory 

Hey I worked hard to answer your question and you just brush me off. :cry:

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OverSword
6 minutes ago, Noteverythingisaconspiracy said:

Hey I worked hard to answer your question and you just brush me off. :cry:

Sorry about that :D

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