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Desertrat56

Letters from Martin Heinrich

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Michelle
1 hour ago, Tatetopa said:

I live on the outskirts of town.  I interact with few people, and my job does not require me to travel through or work in dangerous areas.

Oh, I see. Yes, our shop is in a very bad part of town. I take it with a grain of salt, but I am still very conscious of strange people along with my general surroundings. I've become a master at evasive maneuvers and I do carry a gun. There are times when I am alone there all day. Our regular customers call before coming by to drop something off or for pickup, which is very helpful. Often we are all out on a job so it's hit and miss anyone is there at all anyway. I keep the doors locked and nobody closes up alone. 

All in all, we've been lucky for a lot of years I guess.

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Tatetopa
2 hours ago, Michelle said:

All in all, we've been lucky for a lot of years I guess.

I really hope that luck continues.  I get that from your posts once in a while.  I have always been a floor engineer rather than a desk guy or a computer design person.  Manufacturing is what I have enjoyed for 40 years.  The plant I retired from last year was in the middle of hundreds of acres of agricultural land.  Occasionally I got sent back to consult in Chicago, Detroit, and Ohio.  Standing on the loading dock in Chicago, we saw a dope deal go down across the street. The lobby of the Detroit plant had razor wire  and bullet proof glass. You have to send ID into a receptionist to get let in the inner door.  A week of working on a project there is OK, but I  don't think I would want to live there.  Be safe.

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Michelle
4 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

A week of working on a project there is OK, but I  don't think I would want to live there.  Be safe.

Well, we do live in one of the top two safest neighborhoods in the county though.

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Tatetopa
1 hour ago, Michelle said:

Well, we do live in one of the top two safest neighborhoods in the county though.

That is good.  Is your shop in a safe neighborhood too?

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Michelle
9 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

That is good.  Is your shop in a safe neighborhood too?

Absolutely not. It's across town from where we live though. People tend not to like having manufacturers in their neighborhoods. That area has always been industrial mixed with low income housing.

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Desertrat56
Posted (edited)
mail?url=https%3A%2F%2Fci4.googleusercontent.com%2Fproxy%2FwwwcvPq6vpxFyg5IAthzlJPmBDVEeLPDaw96Gp93MTcc9fzN1io1_kclLxobsDIqJY9oBY5fnolXCIyvbG_sT-Ou0mn_JP1ViTBE-LlP%3Ds0-d-e1-ft%23https%3A%2F%2Fs.bsd.net%2Fheinrich%2Fmain%2Fpage%2F-%2Fheinrich_primary.png&t=1615328602&ymreqid=143e43a8-1c98-e02c-1c2d-b00001013900&sig=0ffenoiuNUO_tK7MRR6pJg--~D

Hello,

This Thursday, my colleagues on the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee and I will be holding a hearing on the widespread blackouts in Texas.

As I have said before, the energy crisis that occurred after Winter Storm Uri was not an accident. It was the predictable and preventable result of Republican deregulation.

A near-complete lack of governmental oversight allowed energy companies in Texas to avoid weatherizing their equipment and allowed the Texas energy grid, ERCOT, to remain un-connected to surrounding or national grids.

But rather than recognizing their role in creating this crisis and taking action to prevent another one, Texas Republicans chose to blame wind energy (including Senator Ted Cruz, who did his blaming en route to Cancún!) while their constituents bore the brunt of the crisis they helped create.

Severe winter weather is not the norm in Texas, but it is not unprecedented. A snap of cold weather caused widespread blackouts in 2011, and clearly Republican politicians and energy companies failed to learn the lessons needed then. Their inaction is directly responsible for the blackouts, exorbitantly high energy bills, and deaths of dozens of Texans last month.

Inclement weather is a reality of climate change. We need to be honest about what happened in Texas to prevent it from happening again. Coal, natural gas, and nuclear plants all failed due to decades of deregulation and lack of oversight. Wind and solar energy are not to blame for these outages — poor governing is.

Over 70 lives were lost to the unnecessary energy crisis created and compounded by Republicans. I am determined to prevent a tragedy like this from happening again. 

 

Thank you. I will continue to keep you updated about my work in the Senate and our progress on issues relating to energy and safety.

— Martin

 

Edited by Desertrat56

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Desertrat56

mail?url=http%3A%2F%2Fheinrich.senate.go

March 19, 2021

Dear Friend,

I cannot support the continued abuse of the filibuster in the United States Senate. This procedural tactic was created to encourage debate and bipartisan deliberation. But in current practice, it has proven to achieve the complete opposite. The roadblock created by the filibuster has prevented the Senate from taking up meaningful action or even debate on so many important issues--at the detriment of the American people.

The filibuster is not what some folks might imagine it to be based on movies like Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. In today's Senate, if one senator just threatens to use the filibuster, popular legislation that has majority support--but not 60 out of 100 votes--dies without any debate. We must change this. The filibuster should be abolished or, at the very least, reformed to force senators who have objections to physically hold the floor to extend debate and tell the American people why they are standing in the way of the Senate's consideration of a bill.

Too often in our nation's history, the filibuster has been used to block our country's continued march toward equality. It was the favored tactic of segregationist Southern senators who banded together as a minority in the Senate to block civil rights, voting rights, and anti-lynching laws in the era of Jim Crow. Today, the filibuster remains the obstacle standing in the way of the Senate passing immigration reform, climate legislation, gun safety measures, and protections for LGBTQ Americans.

Right now, Georgia state legislators are attempting to pass laws that would prevent Black voters from participating in our elections. Let's call this what it is: a racist attempt to steal future elections. We have the legislation to stop this. The House of Representatives has already passed H.R. 1, the For the People Act, which would strengthen ethics and campaign finance laws and restore voting rights to Americans targeted by efforts like those in Georgia. We will never be able to pass this important bill to strengthen our democracy until the Senate reforms or abolishes the filibuster.

This is not an arcane or abstract debate over rules. It has real consequences on people's lives. If the Senate wants to become a legislative body that delivers for the American people, it needs to finally confront the filibuster.

Sincerely,

Signature

MARTIN HEINRICH
United States Senator

 

 

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