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The Eternal Flame

Metal That Conducts Electricity But Not Heat

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The Eternal Flame

Physicists Have Identified a Metal That Conducts Electricity But Not Heat


Nov 30, 2019 Researchers have identified a metal that conducts electricity without conducting heat - an incredibly useful property that defies our current understanding of how conductors work. The metal, found in 2017, contradicts something called the Wiedemann-Franz-Law, which basically states that good conductors of electricity will also be proportionally good conductors of heat...

https://www.sciencealert.com/physicists-identify-a-metal-that-conducts-electricity-but-not-heat?perpetual=yes&limitstart=1

Edited by The Eternal Flame
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Manwon Lender
30 minutes ago, The Eternal Flame said:

Physicists Have Identified a Metal That Conducts Electricity But Not Heat


Nov 30, 2019 Researchers have identified a metal that conducts electricity without conducting heat - an incredibly useful property that defies our current understanding of how conductors work. The metal, found in 2017, contradicts something called the Wiedemann-Franz-Law, which basically states that good conductors of electricity will also be proportionally good conductors of heat...

https://www.sciencealert.com/physicists-identify-a-metal-that-conducts-electricity-but-not-heat?perpetual=yes&limitstart=1

That is very interesting and very useful. One of the biggest problems with conductors is heat that is transferred to objects around the conduct. Because of this limits must be set for the amount of electricity that can be transferred safely useing that form of conductor. With this new material the sky could be the limit.

i have a question along these lines please answer it if you can.

What produces light without the production of heat?

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Hankenhunter
2 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

That is very interesting and very useful. One of the biggest problems with conductors is heat that is transferred to objects around the conduct. Because of this limits must be set for the amount of electricity that can be transferred safely useing that form of conductor. With this new material the sky could be the limit.

i have a question along these lines please answer it if you can.

What produces light without the production of heat?

A firefly. What do I win? :clap:Hmm, Helium could be the answer too if it's a trick question. :unsure2:

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Manwon Lender
24 minutes ago, Hankenhunter said:

A firefly. What do I win? :clap:Hmm, Helium could be the answer too if it's a trick question. :unsure2:

Helium is not correct, Helium Bruns so it does produce heat. Remember the Zeppelins that use to fly from Europe to the USA, they were full of Helium, Rember the Hindenburg that caught fire and burned.

But you un to something with the Firefly, but be more specific. We know it glows because of a chemical reaction, but what chemicals does the firefly tail contain?

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DieChecker

 

37 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

Helium is not correct, Helium Bruns so it does produce heat. Remember the Zeppelins that use to fly from Europe to the USA, they were full of Helium, Rember the Hindenburg that caught fire and burned.

Uhhh.... Those zeppelins used HYDROGEN, not Helium. Helium is a noble gas and normally inert. That's why it is used to fill balloons at dollar stores. It is near 100% safe.

Edited by DieChecker
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Manwon Lender
2 minutes ago, DieChecker said:

 

Uhhh.... Those zeppelins used HYDROGEN, not Helium. Helium is a noble gas and normally inert. That's why it is used to fill balloons at dollars stores. It is near 100% safe.

Thanks for the correction, you are certainly right they were filled with Hydrogen. However they were designed to be filled with Helium gas but because of US Export restrictions they were filled with Hydrogen and that is what caused the Hindenburg disaster.

Lift gas[edit]

Hindenburg was originally designed for helium, heavier than hydrogen but nonflammable. In the 1920s the United Statespossessed a monopoly on the production of helium, obtained as a byproduct of natural gas production. The US Congress banned its export under the Helium Act (1925) in an effort to conserve helium for use in US Navy airships. Eckener expected this ban to be lifted, but to save helium the design was modified to have double gas cells (an inner hydrogen cell protected by an outer helium cell).[1] The ban remained however, so the engineers used only hydrogen despite its extreme flammability.[2] It held 200,000 cubic metres (7,062,000 cu ft) of gas in 16 bags or cells with a useful lift of approximately 232 t (511,000 lb). This provided a margin above the 215 t (474,000 lb) average gross weight of the ship with fuel, equipment, 10,000 kg (22,000 lb) of mail and cargo, about 90 passengers and crew and their luggage.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindenburg-class_airship

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DieChecker

In computer processors it is critical that the material conduct heat away from the lines, as the "movement" of the electricity creates heat and can melt those lines.

I see some use for this, but materials that conduct heat, but not electricity are much more useful.

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Manwon Lender
1 minute ago, DieChecker said:

In computer processors it is critical that the material conduct heat away from the lines, as the "movement" of the electricity creates heat and can melt those lines.

I see some use for this, but materials that conduct heat, but not electricity are much more useful.

Do you know how many house fires are caused by the wiring getting hot, or by the fuse boxs over heating and shorting out which also cause fires. That is just the tip of the ice berg for applications it could be used for, so I must disagree. You touched on its use in computers but actually using this material in the manufacture of Processor Chips would no longer require them to be cooled. This would increase the speed at which a chip can function, this has been the reason why processor speed hasn't gone far beyond where it is today, simple because of heat.

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Hankenhunter
1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

Helium is not correct, Helium Bruns so it does produce heat. Remember the Zeppelins that use to fly from Europe to the USA, they were full of Helium, Rember the Hindenburg that caught fire and burned.

But you un to something with the Firefly, but be more specific. We know it glows because of a chemical reaction, but what chemicals does the firefly tail contain?

 

1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

Helium is not correct, Helium Bruns so it does produce heat. Remember the Zeppelins that use to fly from Europe to the USA, they were full of Helium, Rember the Hindenburg that caught fire and burned.

But you un to something with the Firefly, but be more specific. We know it glows because of a chemical reaction, but what chemicals does the firefly tail contain?

I whooshed you, Manwan. Light as in light as a feather. So Helium is technically correct. Helium produces light without heat.:P

That's what I ment about the trick question.

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Hankenhunter

Off the top of my head, without looking it up, I would say oxygen is one, and my high school chemistry draws a blank on the other. 

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Manwon Lender
Just now, Hankenhunter said:

 

I whooshed you, Manwan. Light as in light as a feather. So Helium is technically correct. Helium produces light without heat.:P

That's what I ment about the trick question.

That's very true, however it wasn't a trick question. The answer I was looking for was a Chemlight, it produces light through luminescence which allows it not to produce heat. The Firefly works the same way except it produces Bioluminescence which allows it to produce light with out heat. There are also sea creatures with this ability so the Firefly isn't alone.

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DieChecker
30 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

Do you know how many house fires are caused by the wiring getting hot, or by the fuse boxs over heating and shorting out which also cause fires. That is just the tip of the ice berg for applications it could be used for, so I must disagree.

Yeah, you're saying household electronics when I'm taking nanometer wide lines of metal. Not really comparable.

House fires get started, not due to heat of the wires, but electric sparks from badly grounded cables, damaged cables, and at soldered points (due to mechanical stresses).

Quote

You touched on its use in computers but actually using this material in the manufacture of Processor Chips would no longer require them to be cooled. This would increase the speed at which a chip can function, this has been the reason why processor speed hasn't gone far beyond where it is today, simple because of heat.

I'd disagree. When working at a nanometer scale if the metal lead lines melt, you get gaps, and then quickly functionality failures.

This material does NOT conduct heat, and thus, logically, would retain any heat created by electrons. The opposite of what would be desired. A material that moved heat out fast would be the ideal.

A material that conducts heat, but resists electricity would be the goal for the base material. Getting the heat OUT is a primary goal of microelectronics. The faster the heat can be moved, the faster the processor can be made to run.

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Manwon Lender
13 minutes ago, DieChecker said:

Yeah, you're saying household electronics when I'm taking nanometer wide lines of metal. Not really comparable.

House fires get started, not due to heat of the wires, but electric sparks from badly grounded cables, damaged cables, and at soldered points (due to mechanical stresses).

I'd disagree. When working at a nanometer scale if the metal lead lines melt, you get gaps, and then quickly functionality failures.

This material does NOT conduct heat, and thus, logically, would retain any heat created by electrons. The opposite of what would be desired. A material that moved heat out fast would be the ideal.

A material that conducts heat, but resists electricity would be the goal for the base material. Getting the heat OUT is a primary goal of microelectronics. The faster the heat can be moved, the faster the processor can be made to run.

I am wrong and you are correct on part of the process this metal controls, however, it also has the ability to act as an insulator which be controlled to happen at any specific temperature.

At the same time, the electrons in the metallic phase became better heat conductors. This enabled researchers to control the amount of heat that vanadium dioxide can dissipate by switching its phase from insulator to metal and vice versa, at tunable temperatures. Such materials can be used to help scavenge or dissipate the heat in engines, or be developed into a window coating that improves the efficient use of energy in buildings, researchers said.

https://www.livemint.com/Science/yTJ7v5epppAfrXG6CvXPJO/Metal-that-conducts-electricity-but-not-heat-found.html

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Manwon Lender
56 minutes ago, DieChecker said:

Yeah, you're saying household electronics when I'm taking nanometer wide lines of metal. Not really comparable.

House fires get started, not due to heat of the wires, but electric sparks from badly grounded cables, damaged cables, and at soldered points (due to mechanical stresses).

I'd disagree. When working at a nanometer scale if the metal lead lines melt, you get gaps, and then quickly functionality failures.

This material does NOT conduct heat, and thus, logically, would retain any heat created by electrons. The opposite of what would be desired. A material that moved heat out fast would be the ideal.

A material that conducts heat, but resists electricity would be the goal for the base material. Getting the heat OUT is a primary goal of microelectronics. The faster the heat can be moved, the faster the processor can be made to run.

Thanks for being patient.

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