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Humans have a natural lifespan of only 38 yrs

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Seti42
1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

I have also heard that, it's a widely known natural medicine. Apparently it has wound healing properties, I just googled it but it doesn't say how.

I don't know how it works and I don't think Doctor's exactly do either...I've only gotten vague answers, even from wound care specialists. I's sure it's linked to how honey doesn't decay, ie: thousand+ year old honey stores have been found, and it's still good.

When my ex wife had an infected wound from a surgery, they used was 'medical grade' honey (basically the really expensive 100% pure stuff, which is naturally sterile, has no added ingredients, etc.). Do not try this with typical grocery store honey, that'd make the wound WORSE. Most of what is sold is a mixture of pure honey and corn syrup/cane syrup. 

It really helped, much more than you'd think. It's basically Neosporin, but better and made by bees. It seems to protect the wound without inflaming it further, it doesn't evaporate or drip off easily, and it seems to pull out bacteria. Now, this was in addition to daily antibiotic injections. It's not a panacea, but it does work on the surface of a wound really well.

Edited by Seti42
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Manwon Lender
1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

Yea that makes perfect sense, and in the old days it would certainly be much harder to keep it contamination free during storage unlike today.

Another natural form of antibacterial is tannic acid. It can be easily procured by soaking acorns from Oak trees in water, the water will turn brown and at point point is ready to bed used as a topical antiseptic. Acorns are also a eatable nut, in Korea the Koreans actually still make a food out of them called Doteri-muk. Tannic acid is a by product of preparing this food. Acorns raw are not eatable, so soaking them in water removes the Tannic Acid so they can be eaten.

In the old days tannic acid was obtained by soaking the bark of oak and other trees along with Acorns. It was used for tanning animal hides, I am not certain but it may still be used today.

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Manwon Lender
1 hour ago, Seti42 said:

I don't know how it works and I don't think Doctor's exactly do either...I've only gotten vague answers, even from wound care specialists. I's sure it's linked to how honey doesn't decay, ie: thousand+ year old honey stores have been found, and it's still good.

When my ex wife had an infected wound from a surgery, they used was 'medical grade' honey (basically the really expensive 100% pure stuff, which is naturally sterile, has no added ingredients, etc.). Do not try this with typical grocery store honey, that'd make the wound WORSE. Most of what is sold is a mixture of pure honey and corn syrup/cane syrup. 

It really helped, much more than you'd think. It's basically Neosporin, but better and made by bees. It seems to protect the wound without inflaming it further, it doesn't evaporate or drip off easily, and it seems to pull out bacteria. Now, this was in addition to daily antibiotic injections. It's not a panacea, but it does work on the surface of a wound really well.

That is some good information thanks for sharing.

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Manwon Lender
2 hours ago, XenoFish said:

Vinegar is one hell of an antiseptic.


Another natural form of antibacterial is tannic acid. It can be easily procured by soaking acorns from Oak trees in water, the water will turn brown and at point point is ready to be used as a topical antiseptic. Acorns are also a eatable nut, in Korea the Koreans actually still make a food out of them called Doteri-muk. Tannic acid is a by product of preparing this food. Acorns raw are not eatable, so soaking them in water removes the Tannic Acid so they can be eaten.

In the old days tannic acid was obtained by soaking the bark of oak and other trees along with Acorns. It was used for tanning animal hides, I am not certain but it may still be used today.
 

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RoofGardener

Hmm... I'd quibble with the premis of the Opening Post Article. 

Part of humans DNA .. or at least its survival strategy... is to use its brain to make nice brick houses with central heating, clean water, the ability to safely store food (e.g. freezers), the internet, and bacon sandwiches. 

So our "natural" lifespan needs to take all of this into account, and hence 38 years is just wrong. 

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Manwon Lender
17 minutes ago, RoofGardener said:

Hmm... I'd quibble with the premis of the Opening Post Article. 

Part of humans DNA .. or at least its survival strategy... is to use its brain to make nice brick houses with central heating, clean water, the ability to safely store food (e.g. freezers), the internet, and bacon sandwiches. 

So our "natural" lifespan needs to take all of this into account, and hence 38 years is just wrong. 

I think the point was that 38 years genetically is the normal human lifespan and that is being backed by Geneticists.

https://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/am/csiro-geneticists-say-38-years-is-the-natural-human-lifespan/11795944

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RoofGardener
Just now, Manwon Lender said:

I think the point was that 38 years genetically is the normal human lifespan and that is being backed by Geneticists.

https://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/am/csiro-geneticists-say-38-years-is-the-natural-human-lifespan/11795944

Indeed @Manwon Lender. My point is that such a viewpoint is too narrow. Our intelligence and tool-using is part of our genetic makeup, and should be factored in when deducing our "natural" lifespan. 

Genetically, we can neither fly, swim long distances, nor survive underwater. Tell this to the worlds airlines, pleasure cruise companies, and the makers of "The Hunt for Red October". :) 

Genetically, we cannot survive against an attack by Tigers. But tell me, who's on the extinction list ? Tigers or Mankind :) 

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fred_mc

Interesting. Yes, we have certainly increased our life span a lot thanks to advanced medicine and building an advanced society where not everyone have to struggle hard every day to hunt/gather food, find drinking water, sew thick clothes/make fires to not freeze to death, keep nightly guard/be constantly prepared with weapons to not be eaten by lions etc.

Personally, as a type 1 diabetic, I would have died at an age of 10 years if I had been born before the 1930s or in one of the many poor countries in the world where there is still no access to insulin.

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Manwon Lender
9 minutes ago, RoofGardener said:

Indeed @Manwon Lender. My point is that such a viewpoint is too narrow. Our intelligence and tool-using is part of our genetic makeup, and should be factored in when deducing our "natural" lifespan. 

Genetically, we can neither fly, swim long distances, nor survive underwater. Tell this to the worlds airlines, pleasure cruise companies, and the makers of "The Hunt for Red October". :) 

Genetically, we cannot survive against an attack by Tigers. But tell me, who's on the extinction list ? Tigers or Mankind :) 

Hey this is a common theory held by many Geneticists, I am sorry but I will listen to them concerning this subject no offense intended. I have no idea what you do for a living, maybe your a Geneticist, if that is so and you hold a different opinion, thats fine by me. For me the point of view is not that narrow at all, the human body is nothing more than a biological machine. Many factors can effect the longevity of any machine. Our, ability to increase this genetic lifespan of ourselves through intelligence is a factor that keeps us as machines functioning longer. 

As far as tool making and other factors they certainly will increase our lifespan. However these factors have nothing to do with the biological clock that slows cell regeneration over time, which is what causes aging. Now better diet, better medical treatments, and a better environment in which we live in obviously helps slow that biological clock and will increase the length of time our biological clocks will tick. 

Now the 38 years of life being spoken about here is the normal genetic lifespan for humans, however, there are genetic abnormalities which can influence lifespan in either direction from normal. There are locations here on Earth were people live a much longer life why? no one knows why people from a specific village in a certain country have a longer running biological machine. In other places lifespan is less, again the reason is unknown however, it is directly do to genetics.

Thanks for the conversation I enjoyed it.

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Manwon Lender
6 minutes ago, fred_mc said:

Interesting. Yes, we have certainly increased our life span a lot thanks to advanced medicine and building an advanced society where not everyone have to struggle hard every day to hunt/gather food, find drinking water, sew thick clothes/make fires to not freeze to death, keep nightly guard/be constantly prepared with weapons to not be eaten by lions etc.

Personally, as a type 1 diabetic, I would have died at an age of 10 years if I had been born before the 1930s or in one of the many poor countries in the world where there is still no access to insulin.

Well all I can say is I agree with you and I am glad your still around.:yes:

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RoofGardener
1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

Hey this is a common theory held by many Geneticists, I am sorry but I will listen to them concerning this subject no offense intended. I have no idea what you do for a living, maybe your a Geneticist, if that is so and you hold a different opinion, thats fine by me. For me the point of view is not that narrow at all, the human body is nothing more than a biological machine. Many factors can effect the longevity of any machine. Our, ability to increase this genetic lifespan of ourselves through intelligence is a factor that keeps us as machines functioning longer. 

As far as tool making and other factors they certainly will increase our lifespan. However these factors have nothing to do with the biological clock that slows cell regeneration over time, which is what causes aging. Now better diet, better medical treatments, and a better environment in which we live in obviously helps slow that biological clock and will increase the length of time our biological clocks will tick. 

Now the 38 years of life being spoken about here is the normal genetic lifespan for humans, however, there are genetic abnormalities which can influence lifespan in either direction from normal. There are locations here on Earth were people live a much longer life why? no one knows why people from a specific village in a certain country have a longer running biological machine. In other places lifespan is less, again the reason is unknown however, it is directly do to genetics.

Thanks for the conversation I enjoyed it.

Well, perhaps I'm talking semantics, @Manwon Lender. To re-iterate: in my opinion, these geneticists are looking at the situation too narrowly. In determining a "biological" natural lifespan, they are forgetting to factor in part of our genetic makeup.. part of our wider "biology", which is to say, our intelligence and ability to imagineer tools and thence technology, central heating, and bacon sandwiches. 

Still, I'm of to bed now, so this will wait until the morning. Which may ALSO involve bacon sandwiches. 

Sweet Dreams everybody :) 

Edited by RoofGardener

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Manwon Lender
22 minutes ago, RoofGardener said:

Well, perhaps I'm talking semantics, @Manwon Lender. To re-iterate: in my opinion, these geneticists are looking at the situation too narrowly. In determining a "biological" natural lifespan, they are forgetting to factor in part of our genetic makeup.. part of our wider "biology", which is to say, our intelligence and ability to imagineer tools and thence technology, central heating, and bacon sandwiches. 

Still, I'm of to bed now, so this will wait until the morning. Which may ALSO involve bacon sandwiches. 

Sweet Dreams everybody :) 

Take care Gardner, I do not equate intelligence and the technology that goes with it as genetic or biological to me they the result of genetics and biology. So respectfully we can agree to disagree on this subject.

Have a great nights sleep, and dream of 38 years, 38 years 38 Years:D

Man you Brits and the Bacon Sandwiches, that stuff will clog your heart or maybe that's how your genetically inclined to function.:w00t::D

Edited by Manwon Lender
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and then
8 hours ago, sci-nerd said:

I'll soon be having my 29th birthday........ for the 18th time :innocent:

That just goes to show how inaccurate a guess about age can be in this setting.  I figured you for a very bright 30-something.  

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and then
7 hours ago, Piney said:

There wasn't many of them. 

True that...and those who did survive were probably a treasure trove of knowledge about how to do what had to be done with the greatest efficiency.  My father-in-law died in 2017 at age 91.  He'd worked for Massey Harris in Canada and when it became Massey Ferguson he had his own dealership for awhile.  The man had no secondary degree or formal schooling past graduating HS in Iowa, just before enlisting in the USN for WWII.  

That man could build dang near anything and he often created his own tools.  I saw him build one of those large scale weed whackers that looked like a lawn mower with only two wheels.  He was using it for a few years before I ever saw a commercial version.  Pete was a man's man and the best one I ever knew.

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and then
7 hours ago, spartan max2 said:

That's external things Killin the body, not the body timing out.

I think that's accurate.  I had a salty old professor when I was in school for medical imaging and he loved to teach a 400 level course about Disease processes and how to identify them in imaging studies.  It was by far the most interesting course I took.  He loved to remind everyone that "if a person lives long enough, we ALL would die from a cancer"  The premise was that the chronic insults we love to experience - smoking, drinking, recreational drug use, chronic overeating, anything that was done with great regularity that wasn't naturally occurring would eventually cause the DNA to hiccup and begin to create flawed copies of cells.  Fortunately, it takes quite a while for most people to trigger that process.

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zep73
19 minutes ago, and then said:

That just goes to show how inaccurate a guess about age can be in this setting.  I figured you for a very bright 30-something.  

Must be the nerd-word. Many people associate it with youth.

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Habitat

Most people would not reach the biblical three score and ten, without some kind of modern medical intervention. 

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Cryptid_Control
6 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

Another natural form of antibacterial is tannic acid. It can be easily procured by soaking acorns from Oak trees in water, the water will turn brown and at point point is ready to bed used as a topical antiseptic. Acorns are also a eatable nut, in Korea the Koreans actually still make a food out of them called Doteri-muk. Tannic acid is a by product of preparing this food. Acorns raw are not eatable, so soaking them in water removes the Tannic Acid so they can be eaten.

In the old days tannic acid was obtained by soaking the bark of oak and other trees along with Acorns. It was used for tanning animal hides, I am not certain but it may still be used today.

I’ve seen it use in smaller shops but not widespread, mostly just people trying to stick to their roots in small towns. Produces the same end product as anything else, just more time consuming. 

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Manwon Lender
5 hours ago, Cryptid_Control said:

I’ve seen it use in smaller shops but not widespread, mostly just people trying to stick to their roots in small towns. Produces the same end product as anything else, just more time consuming. 

I am certain that it works, I even suspect it was used by Native Americans and certainly by trappers and mountain men. But like you said today it would certainly be more time consuming, however, if push comes to shove it will still work. It's also great for an antiseptic to treat Exterior wounds, just like vinegar. 

Take care.

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Festina
23 hours ago, RabidMongoose said:

Guys I have thought about this.

I have never broken anything, I have never had a disease or been severally ill. But, I have had 2 tooth extractions in my 41 years. I suspect they would have all killed a lot of people 1000 years ago.

And childbirth killled many women back in the olden day’s when men outlived women by many years —  Old Wise Men.  This fact kept many women as spinsters and this is why “Spinsters”, single women who spun fibers, were called Old Wise Women.  And then came the so called “Witch” burnings....the churches and the secularists Of Old felt  threatened by old lady healers as according to them Only “Jesus” could heal the sick without knives or poisions.  Ask Agnus Nutter, the herbalist  Health Nut who understood healthy food and exersize were necessary for good health.

 

 

Edited by Festina Lente

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Desertrat56
On 12/14/2019 at 9:17 AM, Piney said:

About 115, Is what DNA is wired for. 

When I was a kid ( in the 60's) our class was told that scientists have determined that humans have a natural lifespan of 120 years.  I plan on proving that.

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aztek

life expectancy in some gang hoods are even lower

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HorusonofRah

I dont have Neandertal or Denisovan DNA so can't relate.

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Desertrat56
3 hours ago, HorusonofRah said:

I dont have Neandertal or Denisovan DNA so can't relate.

So you have no European ancestry at all?

Welcome to the forum by the way.

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HorusonofRah
52 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

So you have no European ancestry at all?

Welcome to the forum by the way.

*fingers crossed*

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