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Eldorado

Homo Erectus survived longer than thought

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Eldorado

"When seafaring modern humans ventured onto the island of Java some 40,000 years ago, they found a rainforest-covered land teeming with life—but they weren’t the first humans to call the island home.

"Their distant ancestor, Homo erectus, had traveled to Java when it was connected to the mainland via land bridges and lived there for approximately 1.5 million years.

"These people made their last stand on the island about 100,000 years ago, long after they had gone extinct elsewhere in the world, according a new study assigning reliable dates to previously found H. erectus fossils.

"The finding suggests a trace of H. erectus DNA could live on in modern Southeast Asian populations, thanks to complex intermingling among the diverse humans who have lived in the region."

Full monty at Science Mag: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/12/ancient-human-species-made-last-stand-100000-years-ago-indonesian-island

 

"Homo erectus lived recently enough that it may have met Denisovans"

At the New Scientist: https://www.newscientist.com/article/2228015-homo-erectus-lived-recently-enough-that-it-may-have-met-denisovans/


"Last appearance of Homo erectus at Ngandong, Java, 117,000–108,000 years ago"

The Research at Nature: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1863-2

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Piney
10 minutes ago, Eldorado said:

"The finding suggests a trace of H. erectus DNA could live on in modern Southeast Asian populations, thanks to complex intermingling among the diverse humans who have lived in the region."

This idea was thrown around Smithsonian 20 something years ago due to certain features found in Native Americans and Asians. I think it's true. 

There has also been some suggestions that Erectus or Denisovan survived up until about 15,000 years ago in Southern Asia but due to DNA degradation in tropical environments the skulls species cannot be determined. 

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Hammerclaw

Quite believable. Modern humans encountered and mingled with relic populations of earlier migrations throughout their early history. We were "human" long before modern man even existed. The fact that we could interact with them on a social level says a lot about their apparent sophistication.

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Farmer77
2 hours ago, Eldorado said:

"When seafaring modern humans ventured onto the island of Java some 40,000 years ago, they found a rainforest-covered land teeming with life—but they weren’t the first humans to call the island home.

"Their distant ancestor, Homo erectus, had traveled to Java when it was connected to the mainland via land bridges and lived there for approximately 1.5 million years.

"These people made their last stand on the island about 100,000 years ago, long after they had gone extinct elsewhere in the world, according a new study assigning reliable dates to previously found H. erectus fossils.

"The finding suggests a trace of H. erectus DNA could live on in modern Southeast Asian populations, thanks to complex intermingling among the diverse humans who have lived in the region."

Full monty at Science Mag: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/12/ancient-human-species-made-last-stand-100000-years-ago-indonesian-island

 

"Homo erectus lived recently enough that it may have met Denisovans"

At the New Scientist: https://www.newscientist.com/article/2228015-homo-erectus-lived-recently-enough-that-it-may-have-met-denisovans/


"Last appearance of Homo erectus at Ngandong, Java, 117,000–108,000 years ago"

The Research at Nature: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1863-2

These stories bring up the imagery of a primitive mos eisley cantina. I like it.

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RoofGardener

Ahhhhhh.. that would explain all those people defecating on the street in San Francisco ? 

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy

We know that there were several hominids living alongside early humans, such as Neanderthals, Denisovans and Homo Floresiensis.

It seems like there were quite a few hominids in early human history. It is surprising that an early hominid lasted that long considering the competition at the time. It goes to show that we are an adaptable bunch. :tu:

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DanL

It is no surprise that they coexisted for a short time with modern man. They were a very successful species...until modern man killed them all. ANY species that competed with modern man faced extermination.

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Myles
20 hours ago, DanL said:

It is no surprise that they coexisted for a short time with modern man. They were a very successful species...until modern man killed them all. ANY species that competed with modern man faced extermination.

They started it!

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DanL
17 hours ago, Myles said:

They started it!

We FINISHED it!

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third_eye
On 12/19/2019 at 9:08 AM, Farmer77 said:

These stories bring up the imagery of a primitive mos eisley cantina. I like it.

We're seeing the same subliminal message movie scene... 

:yes:

~

As for Java and H. erectus, I suspect I have more than a few for neighbors.. 

~

Edited by third_eye
Instinctively forgot
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Farmer77
Just now, third_eye said:

We're seeing the same subliminal message movie scene... 

:yes:

~

Somehow I doubt this is the first time either!

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