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UM-Bot

At what age does life have the most meaning ?

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acute

I think this is an upper middle class or upper class thing.

If you went to the right school, were introduced to the right people, had a successful career, and invested the money wisely, you have little else to worry about.

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Habitat

"Meaning" is an issue for people with spare time on their hands, it is hardly an issue for people who are fully occupied with everyday responsibilities and obligations. Past 60, people typically have more discretion about how they spend their time.

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little_dreamer

The age when you are too tired to seek out meaning and you just want a good nap instead. :sm

Edited by little_dreamer
too tired to spell correctly
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DieChecker

Most meaningful part of your life is Right Now!

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Aaron2016

Life is a series of chapters which enable us to re-evaluate our lives, as we reflect back on our past mistakes, but also our achievements, and seek out ways to adapt ourselves and change our ways for the better, with new goals and priorities set as we move into the next chapter of life with a feeling of reborn optimism.  e.g.  I felt it when I was 16, 26, and recently when i turned 35 this year.  It sort of feels like I lived three different lives, with each one focused on different priorities, desires, relationships, and tastes.  If I were to meet my younger selves we would probably react to each other as total strangers with very little in common.  One thing I found fascinating is that the transition from one chapter of life to the next did not occur gradually over a series of months or years.  The transition came quickly with immediate effect, like stepping into another room and practically becoming a different person.  All part of the joy and wonders of growing up I guess.

 

 

Edited by Aaron2016
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KNash

I think that's subjective. Personally, I think it's when you're old enough to have experienced life but not to the point where you might feel jaded by it.

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joc

I agree...somewhat...btw...

You look like art!B)

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onlookerofmayhem

Life has the most meaning whenever you realize you alone are ultimately the great decider as to what the meaning of life is and actively participate in contributing to that meaning. 

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Manwon Lender
On 12/25/2019 at 1:52 AM, UM-Bot said:

A new study has come up with the age at which most people feel that they no longer need to seek out meaning.

https://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/333249/at-what-age-does-life-have-the-most-meaning

It's an interesting concept, but I think that along with feeling comfortable in your own skin and the knowledge that come along with it socioeconomic factors also play a part in how meaningful life can be. For me I am finally at the point where life seems most meaningful. I am retired and along with my wife I can now enjoy it to its fullest extent. 

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Festina Lente

After one is held by the hand of the Gentle Pilot.  Breath. 

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MissJatti

When doctors tell you that ''you don't have long to live''

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Big Jim

I notice that the curve of meaning described in the article corresponds with the rise and fall of hormonal activity.  The search for meaning and the feeling that you've found it mirrors the search for mates and security and the acquisition of same.  It's also very subjective, as it pointed out.  It's been my belief that our lives can have meaning even if it's not apparent to us.  For example, a teacher may just be doing their job, stuck in a rut, feeling their life has no meaning, but without knowing it inspires some student to have an impact on the world after the teacher has passed away.  Perhaps your purpose is to be a gene bridge from one generation to the next so that qualities you have but don't use have a chance to survive.  Myself, I've never had an issue with meaning, being primarily concerned with survival.  But my sister, who is highly educated and accomplished and works in the medical field improving people's lives is distraught over thinking that her life has no meaning.  It reminds me of similar distortions about ourselves, such as an anorexic who sees themselves as fat.  Meaning is separate from our perceptions of it.

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UFO_Monster
Posted (edited)
On 12/24/2019 at 6:42 PM, Habitat said:

"Meaning" is an issue for people with spare time on their hands, it is hardly an issue for people who are fully occupied with everyday responsibilities and obligations. Past 60, people typically have more discretion about how they spend their time.

I am quoting this just to acknowledge that we both actually agree on something for once. That's a milestone for the ages.

Back when our ancestors were struggling to survive, I sincerely doubt that the idea of "purpose" and "meaning" were on their minds when they were fighting for their lives. I'm sure they did ask questions about what they were doing and why they existed, but not to the extent that people do now. Most people in first world countries aren't hunting for their own food, and have lives of comfort to some degree. We also don't have to scrounge for warmth or make shelter when conditions do not fall into our favor. Air conditioning and heating exist. Most problems that plagued our ancestors have been eradicated in a lot of modern societies thanks to such conveniences. Therefore we have more time to ask questions or wonder if what we're doing is meaningful.

So yeah, I completely agree with this.

As for the question about what age we start asking these questions? I don't really dwell on it, so I don't know. I don't think it's limited to a specific age.

Edited by UFO_Monster

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Habitat
24 minutes ago, UFO_Monster said:

As for the question about what age we start asking these questions? I don't really dwell on it, so I don't know. I don't think it's limited to a specific age.

I think it more likely where there is a lot of free time available, someone once said "social security tends to psychological insecurity". A lot of people avoid thinking too much about these things, by compulsive busyness. But many are just busy by necessity.

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