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Still Waters

Mammoth shows strongest evidence of slaughter

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Still Waters

The Kotelny island woolly mammoth was killed by humans some 21,000 years ago, say scientists. 

Dr Albert Protopopov shared new pictures of the remains found at a location which was then part of the vast Beringia Land Bridge connecting what is now Siberia and North America.

'The traces on the bones show that the mammoth was killed and butchered by ancient people,' he said.

'I believe no other mammoth previously found in the world had such clear signs of being hunted by humans.'

'We found cuts all over its ribs, there were traces of spear strikes with chips left from the darts.'

https://siberiantimes.com/other/others/features/arctic-island-woolly-mammoth-shows-strongest-evidence-yet-of-human-slaughter-and-butchering/

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Piney
41 minutes ago, Still Waters said:

Dr Albert Protopopov shared new pictures of the remains found at a location which was then part of the vast Beringia Land Bridge connecting what is now Siberia and North America.

The term "Land Bridge" makes people think it was a small area. It was a huge area where one group of ancestral Native Americans lived for thousands of years.  

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Manwon Lender
44 minutes ago, Piney said:

The term "Land Bridge" makes people think it was a small area. It was a huge area where one group of ancestral Native Americans lived for thousands of years.  

Yes it is certainly misunderstood by many people who read about the Bering Strait land bridge or as it is also know as Beringia. The “Bering land bridge” wasn’t a bridge at all, for instance—at its greatest extent, it was approximately a landmass roughly as large as Australia, stretching 1,600 kilometers north to south and 4,800 kilometers east to west, from Canada’s Mackenzie River to Russia’s Verkhoyansk Mountains. 

Another interesting part of this thread is how it states that the evidence presented shows the strongest evidence yet of butchering of Mammoths. Yet there have also been numerous other sites, including sites in the continental United States. A good example of this is the Naco kill site where Clovis points were found among the butchered remains of a Mammoth.

peace

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Piney
5 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

Another interesting part of this thread is how it states that the evidence presented shows the strongest evidence yet of butchering of Mammoths. Yet there have also been numerous other sites, including sites in the continental United States. A good example of this is the Naco kill site where Clovis points were found among the butchered remains of a Mammoth.

Oldest evidence for Beringia actually.

5 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

Yes it is certainly misunderstood by many people who read about the Bering Strait land bridge or as it is also know as Beringia. The “Bering land bridge” wasn’t a bridge at all, for instance—at its greatest extent, it was approximately a landmass roughly as large as Australia, stretching 1,600 kilometers north to south and 4,800 kilometers east to west, from Canada’s Mackenzie River to Russia’s Verkhoyansk Mountains. 

The map in the article doesn't even do it justice. It shows it after significant sea level rise. 

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Manwon Lender
Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, Piney said:

Oldest evidence for Beringia actually.

The map in the article doesn't even do it justice. It shows it after significant sea level rise. 

Yea likecI said the numbers were only approximate, but it's still really azaming and so misunderstood by so many.

Peace Bro 

Edited by Manwon Lender
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RabidMongoose
26 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

Yes it is certainly misunderstood by many people who read about the Bering Strait land bridge or as it is also know as Beringia. The “Bering land bridge” wasn’t a bridge at all, for instance—at its greatest extent, it was approximately a landmass roughly as large as Australia, stretching 1,600 kilometers north to south and 4,800 kilometers east to west, from Canada’s Mackenzie River to Russia’s Verkhoyansk Mountains. 

Another interesting part of this thread is how it states that the evidence presented shows the strongest evidence yet of butchering of Mammoths. Yet there have also been numerous other sites, including sites in the continental United States. A good example of this is the Naco kill site where Clovis points were found among the butchered remains of a Mammoth.

peace

Maybe where the tales of Lemuria come from.

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Piney
3 minutes ago, RabidMongoose said:

Maybe where the tales of Lemuria come from.

Except there is no "tales of Lemuria" it was a long disproven paleontology theory that was grabbed by Theosophists and followers of Edgar Cayce. 

 

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Manwon Lender
5 minutes ago, RabidMongoose said:

Maybe where the tales of Lemuria come from.

No I doubt it, there is a big difference between Beringia and Lemuria, especially were the location of Lemuira was suppose to have been located.

Limuria is a hypothetical lost land located in either the Indian or the Pacific Ocean, as postulated by a now-discredited 19th-centuryscientific theory. The idea was then adopted by the occultists of the time and consequently has been incorporated into pop culture. Some Tamil writers have associated it with Kumari Kandam, a mythical lost continent with an ancient Tamil civilization located south of present-day India in the Indian Ocean.

With that said there really is no comparison between a mythical land bridge ( Lemuira ) and Beringia which is a proven land mass that did occur due to loss of Sea level created by the Ice age.

Peace

 

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Orphalesion
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Piney said:

The term "Land Bridge" makes people think it was a small area. It was a huge area where one group of ancestral Native Americans lived for thousands of years.  

 

2 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

Yes it is certainly misunderstood by many people who read about the Bering Strait land bridge or as it is also know as Beringia. The “Bering land bridge” wasn’t a bridge at all, for instance—at its greatest extent, it was approximately a landmass roughly as large as Australia, stretching 1,600 kilometers north to south and 4,800 kilometers east to west, from Canada’s Mackenzie River to Russia’s Verkhoyansk Mountains. 

Another interesting part of this thread is how it states that the evidence presented shows the strongest evidence yet of butchering of Mammoths. Yet there have also been numerous other sites, including sites in the continental United States. A good example of this is the Naco kill site where Clovis points were found among the butchered remains of a Mammoth.

peace

I actually didn't know that. That's very interesting! And that makes a lot more sense than people just running across a kilometre-long land bridge to reach the Americas.

1 hour ago, RabidMongoose said:

Maybe where the tales of Lemuria come from.

Please no. Just no.
Also there were never any "tales" of Lemuria. It was a hypothetical continent used to explain why lemur fossils are found  both in India and Madagaska before they realized that plate tectonics existed.
Also also, Beringia isn't the only sunken land, consider Doggerland, for example (which doesn't have anything to do  with Lemuria)

Edited by Orphalesion
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Manwon Lender
6 minutes ago, Orphalesion said:

 

I actually didn't know that. That's very interesting! And that makes a lot more sense than people just running across a kilometre-long land bridge to reach the Americas.

Please no. Just no.
Also there were never any "tales" of Lemuria. It was a hypothetical continent used to explain why lemur fossils are found  both in India and Madagaska before they realized that plate tectonics existed.
Also also, Beringia isn't the only sunken land, consider Doggerland, for example (which doesn't have anything to do  with Lemuria)

If you want more information on Beringia, ask Piney he knows more than I do about that subject.

peace

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Myles

I guess it is interesting, but is there really anyone surprised that humans hunted large prey.  Imagine the feast when a mammoth was killed.

I wonder if any ivory trinkets have been found dating back that far?     

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toast

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