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Jujo-jo

Discussion on PTSD

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spartan max2
Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, Jujo-jo said:

I didnt intend to share the nasty, nitty gritty here, thought I could talk about PTSD without having to explain the details but now that, that's out and over, getting back to business should be fairly easy. I dont play that pitty me game well, the traumatic events happened and that's that and I know worse has happened, however I did feel a sense of responsibility to answer questions that some of the posters had.

What irritates me the most about it all is that I know other people have been through worse and some are going through worse as we speak and in a way I feel that my issues shouldn't effect me the way it does, point blank!

 

Therefore with all that said I want to share with you a couple of things I havent mentioned that do help which are walking and surfing YouTube occasionally on subjects to take my mind off things.

I dont usually play games but there is one I've found most helpful and I think it is worth mentioning, (just in case someone else would like to check it out,) it is called Mayan Secret. It is a Mahjong based game.

The flute music and sounds of sping, thunder storms and birds are relaxing and the game itself seem to relieve a lot of stress and tention. I found it extremely helpful maybe some of you will also if intetested.

 

It's sounds like you might like trying the indie games Journey and Abzu. They are short but very relaxing. 

Edited by spartan max2
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Jujo-jo
1 hour ago, RabidMongoose said:

Peoples brains cannot cope with high levels of distress.

So when something really distressful happens (like seeing a colleague stand on a IED, or being the victim of a violent crime) the person cannot digest their emotions. There is a blockage, the distress is just too much to swallow. Until it gets gulped down and digested then it continues to remain. A psychologist is supposed to help the person do that by getting them to revisit the trauma and helping them digest it in its original form.

PTSD is basically mental constipation!

good way to put it I am very lucky, i was on disability for for 6 years then went back to work i do have a lot of energy but i know i wouldn't be able to work for anyone else. I have the advantage of coming and going and leaving abruptly when need be, I also have an office in my house and if it weren't for having my own business and the good employees that I do I'd still be cought in that end of the cycle and system. I do see at times where there stress does play a role at times though. And at the time I am -  lol mentally constipated! But this is helping me, I am doing little by little and I thank you all very much!

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simplybill
23 hours ago, Jujo-jo said:

Trigger: my molesxxx, xxxxxst and abuser approached me, he is not supposed to other than through a lawyer he is family, I do have a protection order and no trespassing order but it doesn’t do any good around here and when I called 911 cops couldn't get there before he took off I did have someone else with me, just to fill you in)

Jujo-jo,

Could the bolded part of your quote above be your answer? From what you’ve said about your experiences, it appears that your particular PTSD is caused by the memories of a prolonged and painful sense of powerlessness that gets triggered, ironically, by a sense of powerlessness. 

I too had to recover from some traumatic experiences that occurred in my youth. The cause of my situation was different than yours, but the advice given to me by a caring friend may give you another tool to work with. I don’t remember all of what he said, but the words that gave me hope were: “Don’t let your emotions push you around”. That was the beginning of a long recovery for me. I began to resent the hold that my emotions had on me, and I went to war against that feeling of powerlessness. Eventually, the cause of those emotions lost stature in my eyes and lost the power to control me.

I hope you stay here on UM and keep us informed. I wish you the best!

simplybill

 

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Manwon Lender
13 hours ago, RabidMongoose said:

Peoples brains cannot cope with high levels of distress.

So when something really distressful happens (like seeing a colleague stand on a IED, or being the victim of a violent crime) the person cannot digest their emotions. There is a blockage, the distress is just too much to swallow. Until it gets gulped down and digested then it continues to remain. A psychologist is supposed to help the person do that by getting them to revisit the trauma and helping them digest it in its original form.

PTSD is basically mental constipation!

Your analogy of mental constipation is totally ridiculous. It's not something you feel and know your carrying around with you. It's in your subconscious mind hidden even from yourself, until something occurs that brings it out. When it happens you dont even know what's going on, it like getting shoot in the back with a taser, the shock reverberates throughout your mind /body and you can't control your emotions. I know your trying to help, but your really not because you don't understand the problem at all.

Peace

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Cookie Monster
1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

Your analogy of mental constipation is totally ridiculous. It's not something you feel and know your carrying around with you. It's in your subconscious mind hidden even from yourself, until something occurs that brings it out. When it happens you dont even know what's going on, it like getting shoot in the back with a taser, the shock reverberates throughout your mind /body and you can't control your emotions. I know your trying to help, but your really not because you don't understand the problem at all.

Peace

You dont understand the problem at all.

Emotions can be intense, so intense that they cannot be processed by the brain. The brain activates mechanisms when this happens to protect the person. Its where anxiety, panic attacks, phobias, and PTSD come from. The treatment program of psychologists is about getting the person to revisit the trauma and then helping them process the intense emotions.

Until then they are essentially mentally constipated. They are unable to digest the intense emotion yet it keeps appearing wanting and waiting to be processed. Its a mental blockage that takes a psychologist to fix.

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Manwon Lender
6 hours ago, RabidMongoose said:

You dont understand the problem at all.

Emotions can be intense, so intense that they cannot be processed by the brain. The brain activates mechanisms when this happens to protect the person. Its where anxiety, panic attacks, phobias, and PTSD come from. The treatment program of psychologists is about getting the person to revisit the trauma and then helping them process the intense emotions.

Until then they are essentially mentally constipated. They are unable to digest the intense emotion yet it keeps appearing wanting and waiting to be processed. Its a mental blockage that takes a psychologist to fix.

I understand the problem, I have suffered from PTSD for many years.

peace

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simplybill
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, iridescence said:

I think that PTSD is similar to a bad day that makes you feel ****ty, except that it lasts longer since the events are more traumatic.

The effects of PTSD range from mild to completely debilitating. I was part of a team that was trained as secondary responders for people who had just experienced traumatic events ranging from airplane crashes to home invasions. Seeing those people six months or a year later, you could tell immediately by the look in their eyes how well their recovery was going. It’s different for everybody, because there are so many factors involved. Even something as simple as the amount of coffee a person drank on the day of the event can affect their response to the event.

 

Edited by simplybill
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Manwon Lender
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, iridescence said:

I think that PTSD is similar to a bad day that makes you feel ****ty, except that it lasts longer since the events are more traumatic.

That's an interesting anology, but it's much different. It's more like waking up to something you can't process and can not understand. Where your can't  breath, you can't think, and you have no idea what to do. However, after the first time at least you can understand what's happening but it is still nothing like what normal people experience when they have a bad day.

peace

Edited by Manwon Lender
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Manwon Lender
1 hour ago, simplybill said:

The effects of PTSD range from mild to completely debilitating. I was part of a team that was trained as secondary responders for people who had just experienced traumatic events ranging from airplane crashes to home invasions. Seeing those people six months or a year later, you could tell immediately by the look in their eyes how well their recovery was going. It’s different for everybody, because there are so many factors involved. Even something as simple as the amount of coffee a person drank on the day of the event can affect their response to the event.

 

Thanks for your response its good that some one outside a suffer can understand how bad the effects are. Your point about outside factors such as coffee effecting a relapse may be correct for some, but not for me. Everything I experience is based up external stimulus, like I said above, for me it's muffled sounds or voices, smells, explosions, and such. Most military personnel have very similar problems to mine, I learned this in group sessions. What's strange is sometimes the triggers I listed above effect me very bad and other times they don't really have a major effect. 

After I retired from the US Army, I decided the best way to deal with the problem was to confront it head on. So I took jobs as a contractor and put myself right back into the line of fire. What's interesting is while in very tense situations I could function very well with no major problems. But when I would come back from a trip, I would start to have problems again. Well I finished my last trip in Nov 2019, and I am just going to retire now, I suppose time will tell what's going to happen. At least I have a great support system with my wife and with the VA and military hospital that's near by.

peace

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Desertrat56
On 1/5/2020 at 4:16 PM, Jujo-jo said:

I am a long time victim of PTSD and seeking others to discuss the topic...

I think it could be beneficial to learn from one another on how each of us cope and deal with this disorder. 

I also think it may be a good source of support for one another; if any one should ever feel the need for support.

It's not something I can bring myself to talk about with my closest family or friends.

Triggers and feelings that I have after an episode, (especially if it has happened in front of someone) I am seeking enlightenment on.

I currently use meditation, music, essential oils, aromatherapy and sticker dates plastered on the vehicle windows, fridge and mirrors, to remind me of today and of the year.

I have and occasionally still seek counsel, most likely that will be an on again, off again event for me.

I appreciate you and your courage of any one willing to participate. 

I think a lot of people suffer from PTSD without ever realizing it because theirs is caused by things that are supposed to be normal or they have been told to "get over it", because people don't understand what trauma is or how it can linger. 

I was told that rapid eye movement therapy is very helpful and usually results are noticed after only 2 or 3 sessions, but more may be needed, usually not more than 6.  The theory is that when you are dreaming you are resolving issues and your eyes are rapidly  moving behind your eyelids (don't know if this is really what instigated someone trying it or not).  The concept is that someone talks you through your trauma while waving a wand with a ball on the end so that you are constantly blinking and moving your eyes rapidly.  There is some theory of brain chemicals being triggered.  The people I have talked to who did have horrible traumas that used it say that the difference between REMT and counseling is that when you remember the incident you no longer feel like it just happened but counseling never helped.  The emotional charge has been released and you can remember it without feeling everything fresh again, AND it does not creep in to your day to day subconsciously like before.

I have tried it, but only as a sample at an alternative healing fair.  My trauma may be something I need to address though, since I recently found myself screaming uncontrollably at a neighbor's son and his friends because they drove through my driveway.  I normally would have just walked over and told them to not do that again, but I was screaming, and one of the boys actually balled his fists and took a step towards me, which caused me to scream that I am not afraid of him and take a step towards him.  Luckily the son was smart and got both of us under control just by talking calmly, apologizing and telling his friend to back off.  It was quite bizarre and embarrassing.  I know that incident was triggered by some things that happened a long time ago that I don't think about because it does feel like it just happened when I do think about them.

 

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Desertrat56
23 minutes ago, iridescence said:

I've grown in a toxic family environment and been bullied in school but my symptoms aren't so severe though. The only things that upset me are nightmares that I have almost every night and social anxiety. I avoid toxic people as much as I can.

I found that music helps and trying to sleep/eat well. Sometimes alcohol works too but I don't abuse it.

I don't take any treatment because I don't trust it will have any effect.

I can relate to that. When the angry outbursts happen, I also start to shake like hell. I guess it's because I enter in a fight or flight mode.

Yes, that is how I know what triggered my outbursts, I am ready to fight and go towards it.

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Manwon Lender
2 hours ago, iridescence said:

I've grown in a toxic family environment and been bullied in school but my symptoms aren't so severe though. The only things that upset me are nightmares that I have almost every night and social anxiety. I avoid toxic people as much as I can.

I found that music helps and trying to sleep/eat well. Sometimes alcohol works too but I don't abuse it.

I don't take any treatment because I don't trust it will have any effect.

I can relate to that. When the angry outbursts happen, I also start to shake like hell. I guess it's because I enter in a fight or flight mode.

When it comes to trearment whatever works best for you is what you should keep doing. But Izvestia taken medication for years and I has helped me. 

Peace

 

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Manwon Lender
2 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

I think a lot of people suffer from PTSD without ever realizing it because theirs is caused by things that are supposed to be normal or they have been told to "get over it", because people don't understand what trauma is or how it can linger. 

I was told that rapid eye movement therapy is very helpful and usually results are noticed after only 2 or 3 sessions, but more may be needed, usually not more than 6.  The theory is that when you are dreaming you are resolving issues and your eyes are rapidly  moving behind your eyelids (don't know if this is really what instigated someone trying it or not).  The concept is that someone talks you through your trauma while waving a wand with a ball on the end so that you are constantly blinking and moving your eyes rapidly.  There is some theory of brain chemicals being triggered.  The people I have talked to who did have horrible traumas that used it say that the difference between REMT and counseling is that when you remember the incident you no longer feel like it just happened but counseling never helped.  The emotional charge has been released and you can remember it without feeling everything fresh again, AND it does not creep in to your day to day subconsciously like before.

I have tried it, but only as a sample at an alternative healing fair.  My trauma may be something I need to address though, since I recently found myself screaming uncontrollably at a neighbor's son and his friends because they drove through my driveway.  I normally would have just walked over and told them to not do that again, but I was screaming, and one of the boys actually balled his fists and took a step towards me, which caused me to scream that I am not afraid of him and take a step towards him.  Luckily the son was smart and got both of us under control just by talking calmly, apologizing and telling his friend to back off.  It was quite bizarre and embarrassing.  I know that incident was triggered by some things that happened a long time ago that I don't think about because it does feel like it just happened when I do think about them.

 

I have tried a variety of the treatments offered to veterans, but long term nothing has really had any effect. Like I said above I thought that the best method was to face what caused it head on, by working as a contractor. Again like I said above even when placed back into dicey situations I reacted fine, it was wasn't until I was back that home things started to bother me again. I never had any violent out bursts against other people like you are describing. If that happened to me I would definitely go at least talk with someone. Who knows it could be nothing or it could just be the beginning of something worst starting to occur.

peace

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simplybill
7 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

I was told that rapid eye movement therapy is very helpful and usually results are noticed after only 2 or 3 sessions, but more may be needed, usually not more than 6. 

During my CISM training, one of the guest speakers was an airline pilot who was involved in a horrific inflight incident. He claimed the REM therapy had cured his PTSD symptoms, and he was now symptom-free. He definitely appeared to be in good shape mentally. I’d never heard of REM therapy before, so his presentation really had an impact on me.

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Desertrat56
2 minutes ago, simplybill said:

During my CISM training, one of the guest speakers was an airline pilot who was involved in a horrific inflight incident. He claimed the REM therapy had cured his PTSD symptoms, and he was now symptom-free. He definitely appeared to be in good shape mentally. I’d never heard of REM therapy before, so his presentation really had an impact on me.

I tried a 10 minute sample session at an alternative health fair and it seemed kind of weird, but in 10 minutes I don't think there was time for the person to even come up with enough to make an impact.  I had not thought of it since until someone told me it helped them immensely, and that the help was not forgetting the trauma but taking the emotional charge off it so that if it came up it no longer felt like it just happened even though it had been 20 years.  That is the hardest thing about PTSD is that when something triggers it it feels like it just happened no matter how much time has passed.

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Jujo-jo
Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

I think a lot of people suffer from PTSD without ever realizing it because theirs is caused by things that are supposed to be normal or they have been told to "get over it", because people don't understand what trauma is or how it can linger. 

I was told that rapid eye movement therapy is very helpful and usually results are noticed after only 2 or 3 sessions, but more may be needed, usually not more than 6.  The theory is that when you are dreaming you are resolving issues and your eyes are rapidly  moving behind your eyelids (don't know if this is really what instigated someone trying it or not).  The concept is that someone talks you through your trauma while waving a wand with a ball on the end so that you are constantly blinking and moving your eyes rapidly.  There is some theory of brain chemicals being triggered.  The people I have talked to who did have horrible traumas that used it say that the difference between REMT and counseling is that when you remember the incident you no longer feel like it just happened but counseling never helped.  The emotional charge has been released and you can remember it without feeling everything fresh again, AND it does not creep in to your day to day subconsciously like before.

I have tried it, but only as a sample at an alternative healing fair.  My trauma may be something I need to address though, since I recently found myself screaming uncontrollably at a neighbor's son and his friends because they drove through my driveway.  I normally would have just walked over and told them to not do that again, but I was screaming, and one of the boys actually balled his fists and took a step towards me, which caused me to scream that I am not afraid of him and take a step towards him.  Luckily the son was smart and got both of us under control just by talking calmly, apologizing and telling his friend to back off.  It was quite bizarre and embarrassing.  I know that incident was triggered by some things that happened a long time ago that I don't think about because it does feel like it just happened when I do think about them.

 

Thank you for the information. Yeah embarrassing moments are why I  barricade myself at times when I know I'm fragile. I hope you can resolve the situation with your neighbor.

I've never given it much thought but I bet a lot of people do have it and aren't even aware. Now that I think about it I wasn't aware that was what was wrong with me and listening to the misdiagnosis only set me back farther, as time went on I knew I had it full blowen so when I did start telling my dr. They just worked that right in with the misdiagnosis so I was double treated. It took some time getting there but finally was diagnosed properly and was able to start facing the real issues but just when things were going good she retired. So I went it alone for a for years but found myself a new one and then another one and now finally the one I have now. 

Today she actually called me, so I will see her the end of this week if I dont cancel. I dont think I will right now I am actually looking forward to it, even though she is new at this...

Edited by Jujo-jo
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Jujo-jo
21 hours ago, simplybill said:

Jujo-jo,

Could the bolded part of your quote above be your answer? From what you’ve said about your experiences, it appears that your particular PTSD is caused by the memories of a prolonged and painful sense of powerlessness that gets triggered, ironically, by a sense of powerlessness. 

I too had to recover from some traumatic experiences that occurred in my youth. The cause of my situation was different than yours, but the advice given to me by a caring friend may give you another tool to work with. I don’t remember all of what he said, but the words that gave me hope were: “Don’t let your emotions push you around”. That was the beginning of a long recovery for me. I began to resent the hold that my emotions had on me, and I went to war against that feeling of powerlessness. Eventually, the cause of those emotions lost stature in my eyes and lost the power to control me.

I hope you stay here on UM and keep us informed. I wish you the best!

simplybill

 

Thank you! Good question yes that is it with that half, powerless, hopeless, dread, fright, pain, sickness, embarrassment, humiliated, forced to- well, ok I'd better stop there. I understand what you are saying and i wish it were that easy for me. When I have an episode at times I am not in control to even move. I can not stop the jarring or the shaking, crying, the fear, the thoughts and even the pain from the blows I'm taking that I am not but did, that I am feeling that are very real at that moment, the pain and confusion alone are enough to stop me in my tracks. Sometimes it is so real and hard it can knock me right off my chair or I've lost my balance or I've falling to avoid another.

In the moment at times, my emotions are no longer mine they belong to that time. I have NO control, to control. 

One of the girls who used to work for me once said to me "you're like a spounge, you absorb everything, can't you just let things bounce off you" she did not know that I have PTSD and it was my job to absorb the things going on so that I could correct them properly. She doesnt know it but I tried to use what she had said to my advantage for my condition, unfortunately what I ended up finding out and how I sometimes now view my disorder becasue of this, is that the part of my brain that houses my PTSD is the spounge that will never dry out, the wet spounge drips at times and over flows and it is in a part of my memory system or brain that I can not reach at times, then at other times, no problem, maybe it was helpful for me to see the reason to surrendered and just deal with it as it comes.

I have walked through the puddles of resentment and hate and vengeance and sometimes still have to. My mom used to say dont let your emotion run away with you.... just got to keep, keepin' on, one step at a time...

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Jujo-jo
2 hours ago, simplybill said:

During my CISM training, one of the guest speakers was an airline pilot who was involved in a horrific inflight incident. He claimed the REM therapy had cured his PTSD symptoms, and he was now symptom-free. He definitely appeared to be in good shape mentally. I’d never heard of REM therapy before, so his presentation really had an impact on me.

I heard about it years ago but I'll need a quick refresher to understand. 

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Jujo-jo
7 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

I have tried a variety of the treatments offered to veterans, but long term nothing has really had any effect. Like I said above I thought that the best method was to face what caused it head on, by working as a contractor. Again like I said above even when placed back into dicey situations I reacted fine, it was wasn't until I was back that home things started to bother me again. I never had any violent out bursts against other people like you are describing. If that happened to me I would definitely go at least talk with someone. Who knows it could be nothing or it could just be the beginning of something worst starting to occur.

peace

I shut down, freeze as in unable to move, I cowar, shake, jerk, hide at times when able to move; sleep, dont sleep, lose my appetite, get nauseated and at times even violently sick with throwing up, I sweat, have cold spells,  severe anxiety, my social skills decrease, my thoughts are no longer mine, my speech is affected, wont answer the phone, wont bathe, shower, eat, brush my teeth, comb hair, I barricade myself in my house and cry hard and sometimes during these times even while i am sleeping I wake up and have to dry my the tears from my eyes, face, neck. Husband sometimes thinks I am mad st him cuz I cant talk to him, I want to but no words will come out thoughts are not in the present time they are in that time.

Oh btw I am feeling a bit better today, I cooked a good supper tonight : )     (had to walk out in the middle of it for a short time but I got through it, supper was still hot when I got back to the table) i did manage to make a quick run with the car (but only because I HAD to) but it felt good to get out but was ready to get back in my safe zone. Tomorrow will even be better : )

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Manwon Lender
32 minutes ago, Jujo-jo said:

I shut down, freeze as in unable to move, I cowar, shake, jerk, hide at times when able to move; sleep, dont sleep, lose my appetite, get nauseated and at times even violently sick with throwing up, I sweat, have cold spells,  severe anxiety, my social skills decrease, my thoughts are no longer mine, my speech is affected, wont answer the phone, wont bathe, shower, eat, brush my teeth, comb hair, I barricade myself in my house and cry hard and sometimes during these times even while i am sleeping I wake up and have to dry my the tears from my eyes, face, neck. Husband sometimes thinks I am mad st him cuz I cant talk to him, I want to but no words will come out thoughts are not in the present time they are in that time.

Oh btw I am feeling a bit better today, I cooked a good supper tonight : )     (had to walk out in the middle of it for a short time but I got through it, supper was still hot when I got back to the table) i did manage to make a quick run with the car (but only because I HAD to) but it felt good to get out but was ready to get back in my safe zone. Tomorrow will even be better : )

I truely hope tomorrow will be a great day for you, and me. I will always have your back never let anyone tell you your not a good person and never stop trying to be the best you can be.

peace

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Debra F. II
Posted (edited)
On 1/6/2020 at 10:29 AM, RabidMongoose said:

PTSD is basically mental constipation!

No disrespect just bringing in some humor here...

I've been told constipation causes hemorrhoids...

So then how would you deal with mental hemroids which may be an after effect...

; ) 

Edited by Debra F. II
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Jujo-jo
42 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

I truely hope tomorrow will be a great day for you, and me. I will always have your back never let anyone tell you your not a good person and never stop trying to be the best you can be.

peace

Thank so much for that and I will always have your back, I can not even begin to tell you how much that means to me or the comfort that gives me.

Peace and good days to you.

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Jujo-jo
11 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

Yes, that is how I know what triggered my outbursts, I am ready to fight and go towards it.

Triggers it is good to know what they are but this one I also think we learn them as we go and something that wasn't a trigger at one time has sometimes, suddenly become one. 

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Jujo-jo
40 minutes ago, Debra F. II said:

No disrespect just bringing in some humor here...

I've been told constipation causes hemorrhoids...

So then how would you deal with mental hemroids which may be an after effect...

; ) 

It is good to keep humor up and alive when possible. I could see how humor could help in ways.

I used to do smile therapy it does work but I felt like a fool sometimes doing it, I'm not sure why I dont do it anymore.

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Manwon Lender
13 minutes ago, Jujo-jo said:

Thank so much for that and I will always have your back, I can not even begin to tell you how much that means to me or the comfort that gives me.

Peace and good days to you.

Thank you very much it also means a lot to me.

peace and goods days to you also.

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