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Jujo-jo

Discussion on PTSD

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Jujo-jo
4 hours ago, simplybill said:

During my CISM training, one of the guest speakers was an airline pilot who was involved in a horrific inflight incident. He claimed the REM therapy had cured his PTSD symptoms, and he was now symptom-free. He definitely appeared to be in good shape mentally. I’d never heard of REM therapy before, so his presentation really had an impact on me.

 Sounds like this is something you'd get the most beneficial effects from by doing with two persons and something you really cant do by yourself? I'll be asking my therapist about this when I see her next as well see if she's familiar with it or trained to do it. Thanks 

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Jujo-jo
4 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

I tried a 10 minute sample session at an alternative health fair and it seemed kind of weird, but in 10 minutes I don't think there was time for the person to even come up with enough to make an impact.  I had not thought of it since until someone told me it helped them immensely, and that the help was not forgetting the trauma but taking the emotional charge off it so that if it came up it no longer felt like it just happened even though it had been 20 years.  That is the hardest thing about PTSD is that when something triggers it it feels like it just happened no matter how much time has passed.

Taking the emotional charge off, wow wouldn't that be great! I had to read this three times before I could comprehend it because of my emotions! And yes very true there with that last part. You're in the, there and now, not the here and now.

REM sounds kind of like a form of hypnosis.

 

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simplybill
3 minutes ago, Jujo-jo said:

 Sounds like this is something you'd get the most beneficial effects from by doing with two persons and something you really cant do by yourself? I'll be asking my therapist about this when I see her next as well see if she's familiar with it or trained to do it. Thanks 

I’d be interested to know what your therapist’s opinion is on REM therapy. I’ve never known anyone who’s been through the therapy other than the pilot who talked to our class.

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Jujo-jo

What are anyones thoughts on Reiki? Has any one tried this for PTSD here? I am not sure about it, is it occult, is it normal? Something about it just doesn't seem right! I am familiar with hands in healing but that is much different than reiki and using symbols and calling people masters? I've even someone do reiki on a computer once.

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Jujo-jo
6 minutes ago, simplybill said:

I’d be interested to know what your therapist’s opinion is on REM therapy. I’ve never known anyone who’s been through the therapy other than the pilot who talked to our class.

I will definitely keep you posted. I'll be seeing here the end of this week.

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simplybill
6 minutes ago, Jujo-jo said:

I will definitely keep you posted. I'll be seeing here the end of this week.

Here’s a good article from Wikipedia:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eye_movement_desensitization_and_reprocessing

 

And here’s an interesting quote from a webmd.com article:

“While walking through the woods one day, Shapiro happened to notice that her own negative emotions lessened as her eyes darted from side to side. Then, she found the same positive effect in patients. EMDR appears to be a safe therapy, with no negative side effects.”

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/emdr-what-is-it#1

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Jujo-jo
18 minutes ago, simplybill said:

 

Thinking on the lines of humor and (metal illness) my husband made a funny today. Making a long conversation short, we were talking about the events of our last few days and I made the comment to him, "it's not like I have a mental illness, post traumatic stress disorder is much different and we both know it's a temporary situation." His humor side kicked in at that point and he started doing those exercises that he does with his eyes lol and started teasing on me pretty hard, trying to get me to laugh and it did work and it did help but later it also got me thinking about where does it fall into place with mental illnes; (and it says that REM is a type of psychotherapy). I know I've been educated on this at some point but cant remember now and I will talk to the therapist about it but I also wonder what do other people with PTSD think about this side of this disorder?

I dont want to be mentally ill! and I dont categorize myself as being mentally ill, is that wrong?

If you have PTSD do you feel the same way? 

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RabidMongoose
6 hours ago, simplybill said:

I’d be interested to know what your therapist’s opinion is on REM therapy. I’ve never known anyone who’s been through the therapy other than the pilot who talked to our class.

A psychologist would get you to mentally revisit the traumatic incident to bring to the forefront the intense distress you felt at the time.

While doing this their job is to get that intense distress digested in your brain so that you can move on from it. A common technique is to get you to move your eyes continuously back and forth between left and right. If you experiment with it you will notice it makes the intense distress feel less severe meaning it has been dampened down making it easier to mentally digest. It usually requires several treatments do cause a decent improvement to the person with PTSD.

It is vital to get treated for PTSD as soon as possible because with trauma constantly floating about it does cause changes to brain neurons seen in people who have been exposed to chronic distress. Western medicine has no way to reverse the thickening off neuron membranes, although Eastern medicine does.

They make a synthetic drug that is identical to a compound found in Aswagandha. People do buy that herb as a supplement to reverse the impacts of chronic stress on neurons. It also makes you grow, even if your way past the age that your growth plates have fused which can come as a surprise. It basically alters the turnover of bone in your body so that new bone is laid down faster than old bone is removed.

http://laurahealingwithspirit.com/why-ashwagandha-root-could-be-the-cure-for-the-western-epidemic-of-stress-related-illness/

https://www.webmd.com/vitamiAshwagandhans/ai/ingredientmono-953/ashwagandha

 

 

 

 

=

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Desertrat56
11 hours ago, Debra F. II said:

No disrespect just bringing in some humor here...

I've been told constipation causes hemorrhoids...

So then how would you deal with mental hemroids which may be an after effect...

; ) 

I have found it very easy to skip anything Rabid Mongoose says as it never makes any sense, or seems to be insulting.

I like your answer though.  :lol:

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Desertrat56
11 hours ago, Jujo-jo said:

Triggers it is good to know what they are but this one I also think we learn them as we go and something that wasn't a trigger at one time has sometimes, suddenly become one. 

I think it is more a noticing the trigger and being able to think it through rather than act on it, but then being in a weak mental state one day and hitting that trigger without the ability to calm down and think it through.  The trigger I described was not a new one, it was one I have worked on tracking to the source for a long time, and recognizing it in order to keep from reacting to it.

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RabidMongoose
Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

I have found it very easy to skip anything Rabid Mongoose says as it never makes any sense, or seems to be insulting.

I like your answer though.  :lol:

If you want me to bite you have to do a better job than that lol.

You are losing your edge.

Edited by RabidMongoose
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Desertrat56
11 hours ago, Jujo-jo said:

Taking the emotional charge off, wow wouldn't that be great! I had to read this three times before I could comprehend it because of my emotions! And yes very true there with that last part. You're in the, there and now, not the here and now.

REM sounds kind of like a form of hypnosis.

 

It might be, and I would be vigilant about the person who does it for you, as some of them might not really understand PTSD.  I know some just got certified to have an income.  If you decide to try it, I suggest interviewing  more than one person before deciding who will facilitate. 

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RabidMongoose
Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

It might be, and I would be vigilant about the person who does it for you, as some of them might not really understand PTSD.  I know some just got certified to have an income.  If you decide to try it, I suggest interviewing  more than one person before deciding who will facilitate. 

You do realise that a practising psychologist has to be registered with the particular nations relevant medical body. To get membership its at least one 4-5 year degree and then residence for another 4 years before people are let lose on their own. Most medical professions require 2 degrees.

Edited by RabidMongoose
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Desertrat56
7 minutes ago, RabidMongoose said:

If you want me to bite you have to do a better job than that lol.

You are losing your edge.

Looks like you made an attempt at a bite.  :P

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Manwon Lender
12 hours ago, Debra F. II said:

No disrespect just bringing in some humor here...

I've been told constipation causes hemorrhoids...

So then how would you deal with mental hemroids which may be an after effect...

; ) 

You know he does mean well, and I suspose that's all that really counts.

peace

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Desertrat56
Just now, RabidMongoose said:

You do realise that a practising psychologist has to be registered with the particular nations relevant medical body.

Its at least one 4-5 year degree and then residence for another 4 years before people are let lose on their own.

In the U.S. most states do not require a "counselor" to register, much less get certified.  REMT falls in that category as it is not recognized as psychology.  So, what you say does not apply.  Maybe it does where you live, but in the U.S. it is still a big bag of random crap when it comes to counseling or therapies that might help people.

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RabidMongoose
Just now, Desertrat56 said:

In the U.S. most states do not require a "counselor" to register, much less get certified.  REMT falls in that category as it is not recognized as psychology.  So, what you say does not apply.  Maybe it does where you live, but in the U.S. it is still a big bag of random crap when it comes to counseling or therapies that might help people.

If you want treatment for PTSD you go to a psychologist not a counsellor who has done a 6 week course on a topic who then thinks they know what they`re doing. What are you on about?

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Desertrat56
Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, RabidMongoose said:

If you want treatment for PTSD you go to a psychologist not a counsellor who has done a 6 week course on a topic who then thinks they know what they`re doing. What are you on about?

Did you not read that a psychologist does not help long term?  Two different people said something like that.  And why do you care?  Only to be right.  I only made a suggestion and relayed what some people had told me.  I also gave a disclaimer about being careful who you let give you REMT.  

In some ways you british are lucky that every thing concerning health is so regulated, in another way you aren't.  When it comes to psychology no one can convince me it is real science, too many variables and too many unstable people practicing their "trade" on others who actually need help, but don't get it because they are going to someone who could pass all the tests to be certified but are not sane themselves.  What kind of people do you think are attracted to get psychology degree?

Edited by Desertrat56
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Jujo-jo
24 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

It might be, and I would be vigilant about the person who does it for you, as some of them might not really understand PTSD.  I know some just got certified to have an income.  If you decide to try it, I suggest interviewing  more than one person before deciding who will facilitate. 

Good advice, Thanks!

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RabidMongoose
Posted (edited)
19 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

Did you not read that a psychologist does not help long term?  Two different people said something like that.  And why do you care?  Only to be right.  I only made a suggestion and relayed what some people had told me.  I also gave a disclaimer about being careful who you let give you REMT.  

In some ways you british are lucky that every thing concerning health is so regulated, in another way you aren't.  When it comes to psychology no one can convince me it is real science, too many variables and too many unstable people practicing their "trade" on others who actually need help, but don't get it because they are going to someone who could pass all the tests to be certified but are not sane themselves.  What kind of people do you think are attracted to get psychology degree?

Its not about being right, its about correcting something stated which is wrong. Psychologists do help, but if a person doesnt have the money for lengthy treatment I can imagine them not reaching the outcome they desired. I can see money being a genuine problem in the USA for many poorer people although I personally hope the US military looks after those traumatised by war.

Healthcare is regulated in every Western nation otherwise someone could walk into a hospital and call themselves a doctor. I am not a psychologist, although I know a lot about psychology in the workplace due to my education, and it is a very real and a very useful science. It is applied in business science, it works, it predicts 95% of employee behaviour, and the models do not claim to be the final say on a topic which is why they arent 100%.

There is no set type of person who takes a psychology degree, people from all backgrounds can study them. If I go off down the business consulting direction later in life then I would like to pick up one too so that I can keep myself at the forefront of human behavioural psychology in the workplace. Psychology is valuable to politicians, to the police, to the medical sector, to business, to marketing and advertising, to the armed forces.

I suspect you think psychology is wholly about treating mental health complaints when it isn't. Its about understanding human behaviour, human development, human learning, etc, so that it can be applied in a wide range of situations and applications.

Edited by RabidMongoose
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Desertrat56
1 minute ago, RabidMongoose said:

Its not about being right, its about correcting something stated which is wrong. Psychologists do help, but if a person doesnt have the money for lengthy treatment I can imagine them not reaching the outcome they desired. I can see money being a genuine problem in the USA for many poorer people although I personally hope the US military looks after those traumatised by war.

Healthcare is regulated in every Western nation otherwise someone could walk into a hospital and call themselves a doctor. I am not a psychologist, although I know a lot about psychology in the workplace due to my education, and it is a very real and a very useful science. It is applied in business science, it works, it predicts 95% of employee behaviour, and the models do not claim to be the final say on a topic which is why they arent 100%.

There is no set type of person who takes a psychology degree, people from all backgrounds can study them. If I go off down the business consulting direction later in life then I would like to pick up one too so that I can keep myself at the forefront of human behavioural psychology in the workplace. Psychology is valuable to politicians, to the police, to the medical sector, to business, to marketing and advertising, to the armed forces.

I suspect you think psychology is wholly about treating mental health complaints when it isn't.

My main point is that you can't assume something is true in the U.S. just because it is true in the U.K.  Do some research about REM therapy in the U.K. and see if it falls under the label of psycological help.  It doesn't in the U.S.

As for my comment about psychology I do not retract it, that is my experience and I am glad you have had a different experience, if any at all.

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Debra F. II
16 hours ago, Jujo-jo said:

Thinking on the lines of humor and (metal illness) my husband made a funny today. Making a long conversation short, we were talking about the events of our last few days and I made the comment to him, "it's not like I have a mental illness, post traumatic stress disorder is much different and we both know it's a temporary situation." His humor side kicked in at that point and he started doing those exercises that he does with his eyes lol and started teasing on me pretty hard, trying to get me to laugh and it did work and it did help but later it also got me thinking about where does it fall into place with mental illnes; (and it says that REM is a type of psychotherapy). I know I've been educated on this at some point but cant remember now and I will talk to the therapist about it but I also wonder what do other people with PTSD think about this side of this disorder?

I dont want to be mentally ill! and I dont categorize myself as being mentally ill, is that wrong?

If you have PTSD do you feel the same way? 

I have no answers but this may be helpful...

https://www.nami.org/learn-more/mental-health-conditions/posttraumatic-stress-disorder

Someone with PTSD may have additional disorders, as well as thoughts of or attempts at suicide:

These other illnesses can make it challenging to treat PTSD. For example, medications used to treat OCD or depression may worsen symptoms of PTSD. Successfully treating PTSD almost always improves these related illnesses and successful treatment of depression, anxiety or substance use usually improves PTSD symptoms.

 

Reviewed December 2017

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spartan max2
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, RabidMongoose said:

If you want treatment for PTSD you go to a psychologist not a counsellor who has done a 6 week course on a topic who then thinks they know what they`re doing. What are you on about?

To be a private practice therapist in the U.S you at least need a master's degree, with a required amount of supervised field hours to graduate. 

A master's in social work or counselling. A psychologist will have a PHD.

A LISW or LPCC.

For example in Ohio to get the LISW or LPCC after your master's degree you have to still get 150 hours of supervision from someone with that license, spread out over at least 2 years. And then you have to pass another license exam.

So it's a 8 yes process at the very quickest pace.

I know this process well because I'm currently working on my 150 hours lol.

Edited by spartan max2
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Jujo-jo
4 hours ago, spartan max2 said:

To be a private practice therapist in the U.S you at least need a master's degree, with a required amount of supervised field hours to graduate. 

A master's in social work or counselling. A psychologist will have a PHD.

A LISW or LPCC.

For example in Ohio to get the LISW or LPCC after your master's degree you have to still get 150 hours of supervision from someone with that license, spread out over at least 2 years. And then you have to pass another license exam.

So it's a 8 yes process at the very quickest pace.

I know this process well because I'm currently working on my 150 hours lol.

Congratulations! You're almost there, it will be over before you know it!

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simplybill
22 hours ago, Jujo-jo said:

I dont want to be mentally ill! and I dont categorize myself as being mentally ill, is that wrong?

No, it’s not wrong at all. 

To me, it’s an indication that you’re on the path to recovery. In that statement, you declared war on the malignant thoughts and emotions that have been beating up on you. 

“I don’t categorize myself as mentally ill.” That thought will be an anchor for you, to keep you grounded when the negative thoughts attack. You’ve found hope for the future. 

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