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Great Pyramid hidden chamber set for re-scan

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Piney
36 minutes ago, DreadLordAvatar said:

Goes for everything else, all off limits to any research required to validate these “extraordinary” theories which seems they go great lengths to deny.  The ministry won’t allow any of it, you’ll just have to take their word for it, and which you and many here seem to have. Sad.

So have you ever journeyed their yourself to try to enter the Sphinx Sphincter? 

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Hanslune
2 hours ago, DreadLordAvatar said:

That’s why I put unfinished pyramid in quotes, and it’s obviously not. But officials won’t let anyone study it.  Too bad, we’ll never know. Goes for everything else, all off limits to any research required to validate these “extraordinary” theories which seems they go great lengths to deny.  The ministry won’t allow any of it, you’ll just have to take their word for it, and which you and many here seem to have. Sad.

Its unfinished because it was....wait for it - unfinished or it might have been partially finished then robbed of its stone. If I remember correctly Aryan is located on the site of an Egyptian army base and during that/this time it was off limits since the 60's. However it was studied prior to that. I hate to tell you this but in Egypt the military has far more power than Ministry of antiquities.

So you're going to have convince the government to allow people to go study the abandoned pit. Probably not going to happen for some time. I guess the secrets of the universe are there and were missed by the earlier expeditions.

How much influence do you have with El-Sisi? What none? I guess its your fault then.

I'd much rather excavate the areas now built over in the vicinity of Giza itself - but again that ain't happen anytime soon - it might be useful too to removed the population of Cairo and excavate underneath it - shouldn't be difficult to move the score of million people, no problem at all.....

I guess you abandoned your idea about the Sphinx....LOL

 

Edited by Hanslune
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kmt_sesh
4 hours ago, DreadLordAvatar said:

That’s why I put unfinished pyramid in quotes, and it’s obviously not. But officials won’t let anyone study it.  Too bad, we’ll never know. Goes for everything else, all off limits to any research required to validate these “extraordinary” theories which seems they go great lengths to deny.  The ministry won’t allow any of it, you’ll just have to take their word for it, and which you and many here seem to have. Sad.

That's not exactly true. The French among others have studied and published Abu Rawash long ago.

Consensus is that the pyramid was finished but scavenged after the king's death. I personally believe the pyramid was just never finished and much of the granite and limestone masonry was simply scavenged when Djedefre died. But what do you think is the "real" story? You need to support yourself and present a well-rounded argument, rather than posting and running. By the way, Abu Rawash is in the vicinity of numerous military emplacements that the Egyptian government jealousy protects.

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kmt_sesh

Oh, by the way, DreadLord, welcome to our forum. I hope you enjoy it. My pal Hanslune has milk and cookies in the lounge. :su

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Hanslune
42 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

That's not exactly true. The French among others have studied and published Abu Rawash long ago.

Consensus is that the pyramid was finished but scavenged after the king's death. I personally believe the pyramid was just never finished and much of the granite and limestone masonry was simply scavenged when Djedefre died. But what do you think is the "real" story? You need to support yourself and present a well-rounded argument, rather than posting and running. By the way, Abu Rawash is in the vicinity of numerous military emplacements that the Egyptian government jealousy protects.

He seems to be referring to the other unfinished pyramid at Aryan which is about 3 km SE of Giza while Abu is north. Yeah looked it up it on the military base for Egyptian military engineers

 

 

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Hanslune
33 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

Oh, by the way, DreadLord, welcome to our forum. I hope you enjoy it. My pal Hanslune has milk and cookies in the lounge. :su

Hey I don't do milk and cookies I'm more of a Gujarati style shrimp curry and Mexican coke guy

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kmt_sesh
2 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

Hey I don't do milk and cookies I'm more of a Gujarati style shrimp curry and Mexican coke guy

Well, that sounds even better. I'll have some of that. ^_^

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Hanslune
23 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

I find it very dark and tight. I usually just run around till I get pooped out. :P

More serious question that was brought up by our new contributor Dread.

Kmt_Sesh what sites in Egypt would you like to see re-examined or excavated for the first time?

I'm partial as I said to getting under the areas near Giza but also a detailed re-examinations of the 2-3-4-5th dynasty mastabas, pyramids and the cemetery fields associated with them plus the AE forts in 'Palestine' and in Nubia.

 

 

Edited by Hanslune

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Sir Wearer of Hats
3 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

More serious question that was brought up by our new contributor Dread.

Kmt_Sesh what sites in Egypt would you like to see re-examined or excavated for the first time?

I'm partial as I said to getting under the areas near Giza but also a detailed re-examinations of the 2-3-4-5th dynasty mastabas, pyramids and the cemetery fields associated with them plus the AE forts in 'Palestine' and in Nubia

Can they bulldoze and excavate the ****ing KFC near the pyramids? It might make my father shut the **** up about the damn place. Every damn time we watch a doco on the pyramids he mentions that ****ing KFC.

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Hanslune
12 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

Can they bulldoze and excavate the ****ing KFC near the pyramids? It might make my father shut the **** up about the damn place. Every damn time we watch a doco on the pyramids he mentions that ****ing KFC.

Huh don't recall it must have been built since I was last there.

Oh there it is:

Ah yes the lovely architecture I remember from most Arab cities. I used to called it 'Early Arab Ugly'.

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jaylemurph
45 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

Can they bulldoze and excavate the ****ing KFC near the pyramids? It might make my father shut the **** up about the damn place. Every damn time we watch a doco on the pyramids he mentions that ****ing KFC.

This is a glimpse into the Aussie psyche I have no idea what to do with. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Scott Creighton
Quote

"It took awhile for the Supreme Council to be convinced of that void, but now Dr. Zahi Hawass, and Dr. Mark Lehner are talking openly about it, as a possible store of something significant." from here.

I agree. The Big Void most certainly was used to store "something significant".

 

Hall of the Ancestors.

 

SC

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Hanslune
19 minutes ago, Scott Creighton said:

I agree. The Big Void most certainly was used to store "something significant".

 

Hall of the Ancestors.

 

SC

Certainly possible (burial of older relatives) but I would suspect the stories about floods would be a Christian meme attached to an earlier AE concern about floods.

Reliving chamber - while we know the corbel arch is strong the AE would not have so that is again (weakly I agree) possible also.

I suspect we'll find rocks, dust, sand and more graffiti and something that wasn't completed. whatever it was suppose to be.

Yeah drilling in and camera.

 

Edited by Hanslune
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The Wistman

From January 2019, the drilling followed by camera insertion is contemplated/planned for the lower, smaller void.  Has that changed?

Quote

Scientists plan to conduct more muon testing in the Great Pyramid; and they are developing robots that may be able to enter the smaller void and peer inside using a high-resolution camera.

Currently, the scientists know little more about the larger void than its length. "There is a big difference if the [larger] void is horizontal or if it is inclined," said Mehdi Tayoubi, the president and co-founder of the Heritage Innovation Preservation Institute, one of the institutions involved with the Scan Pyramids project. If the larger void is inclined, for instance, it could be a large passageway like the grand gallery, Tayoubi explained. On the other hand, if the void is horizontal, then it could consist of one or more chambers. Additionally, it's possible that the smaller void, which scientists already know consists of a corridor, could have linked up to the larger void in ancient times, Tayoubi said.

Quote

While the new muon tests are being carried out, another team, led by Jean-Baptiste Mouret, a senior researcher at Inria, the French National Institute for Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, is constructing two robots that may be able to peer inside the smaller void.

Mouret said that the team would drill a hole about 1.5 inches (3.8 centimeters) across and then insert the little robots through it and into the void.

TGqsVbMi3U4qFMmdXMFz43-650-80.jpg.e2214e01410bbaaeb5ab401e98f57117.jpg

Drilling through to the large void from the Grand Gallery seems challenging.  Is it what's currently cotemplated, ie: since the LiveScience January 2019 article?

https://www.livescience.com/61435-great-pyramid-mysterious-voids.html

 

edit: spelling error  :o

Edited by The Wistman
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Hanslune

What is the estimated distance from the near point to the larger void? 5 meters I believe was one such number?

I would suspect they would first drill into the smaller void associated with a former entrance. Easier to get too and higher chance of something actually being there.

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jaylemurph
3 hours ago, Scott Creighton said:

I agree. The Big Void most certainly was used to store "something significant".

 

Hall of the Ancestors.

 

SC

Well, you know, you’ve got noted writer of racist fiction, H P Lovecraft, on your side. So there’s the wrong side of history as your support. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Scott Creighton
25 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

Well, you know, you’ve got noted writer of racist fiction, H P Lovecraft, on your side. So there’s the wrong side of history as your support. 

—Jaylemurph 

More pertinent to this question is that I have the Coptic-Egyptian oral tradition on my side. So you can ram your back-handed racist innuendo where the sun don't shine. Utterly despicable comment and no need for it whatsoever. Grow up.

SC

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Sir Wearer of Hats
4 minutes ago, Scott Creighton said:

More pertinent to this question is that I have the Coptic-Egyptian oral tradition on my side. So you can ram your back-handed racist innuendo where the sun don't shine. Utterly despicable comment and no need for it whatsoever. Grow up.

SC

Well, the copts are Christians, I’m struggling to comprehend why they’d have any specialist knowledge of thr Sphinx or the pyramids, given the vast gulf betwixt construction and Coptic occupation.

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Scott Creighton
12 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

Well, the copts are Christians, I’m struggling to comprehend why they’d have any specialist knowledge of thr Sphinx or the pyramids, given the vast gulf betwixt construction and Coptic occupation.

Their religion has little to do with this. The Coptic-Egyptians claim as their heritage to be the descendants of the Old Kingdom pyramid builders. And they were something of specialists in preserving their history in oral form as a result of several invasions (Macedonian, Roman and Arab) and suffered many centuries of persecution since the time of Alexander the Great where almost all of their books and history was destroyed. They developed the oral tradition as a 'secret' means to hold onto their history. Eventually in 874 AD, some Arabic scholars came to put this oral history into written form.

SC

Edited by Scott Creighton

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jaylemurph
38 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

Well, the copts are Christians, I’m struggling to comprehend why they’d have any specialist knowledge of thr Sphinx or the pyramids, given the vast gulf betwixt construction and Coptic occupation.

They say what Scott wants to hear. That’s about as much rigor as I’ve heard him use. 

—Jaylemurph 

Edited by jaylemurph
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Piney
50 minutes ago, Scott Creighton said:

 I have the Coptic-Egyptian oral tradition on my side.

:lol:

As a former Native American Cultural Resource Officer with Smithsonian I can tell you how accurate oral tradition is. 

Not even a little bit!! :lol:

 

Edited by Piney
**** Atlantis
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Sir Wearer of Hats
27 minutes ago, Scott Creighton said:

Their religion has little to do with this. The Coptic-Egyptians claim as their heritage to be the descendants of the Old Kingdom pyramid builders. And they were something of specialists in preserving their history in oral form as a result of several invasions (Macedonian, Roman and Arab) and suffered many centuries of persecution since the time of Alexander the Great where almost all of their books and history was destroyed. They developed the oral tradition as a 'secret' means to hold onto their history. Eventually in 874 AD, some Arabic scholars came to put this oral history into written form.

SC

So.... an ancient group of people, descended from the pyramid builders (so let’s call them Ra Worshippers?) went underground to secretly protect their wisdom from the invaders but decided to take the coin of one invader (and notorious destroyer of hidden knowledge) the Christians? And they let another destroyer of hidden wisdom (the Arabs) write it down?

Why become an actual Christian denomination rather than simply lip-service it? Why do they hold their ancient beliefs in such disregard that they’d become Christian? I mean, the whole burning of the Library of Alexandria and lynching of Hypatia should REALLY have sent a strong signal of “keep the hell away from these people”. 

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Scott Creighton
6 minutes ago, Piney said:

:lol:

As a former Native American Cultural Resource Officer with Smithsonian I can tell you how accurate oral tradition is. 

Not even a little bit!! :lol:

 

Indeed. Some will be more accurate than others for sure. If, for example, it's a matter of life and death, they do tend to be pretty robust and hold their accuracy.

Aboriginal folklore could be oldest accurate oral history in the world: Stories of ancient sea level rise have survived for 10,000 years.

SC

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Sir Wearer of Hats
20 minutes ago, Scott Creighton said:

Indeed. Some will be more accurate than others for sure. If, for example, it's a matter of life and death, they do tend to be pretty robust and hold their accuracy.

Aboriginal folklore could be oldest accurate oral history in the world: Stories of ancient sea level rise have survived for 10,000 years.

SC

It’s somewhat disengenuous to implicitly compare an Oral tradition that lasted tens of thousands of years unmolested by outside cultures with one in the cultural melting pots of the world. Or anywhere else for that matter.

 

or for that matter, within the very culture that has that tradition, as by oral history Uluru is a sleeping man. 

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