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Great Pyramid hidden chamber set for re-scan

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Piney
44 minutes ago, Scott Creighton said:

Indeed. Some will be more accurate than others for sure. If, for example, it's a matter of life and death, they do tend to be pretty robust and hold their accuracy.

Aboriginal folklore could be oldest accurate oral history in the world: Stories of ancient sea level rise have survived for 10,000 years.

SC

 

23 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

It’s somewhat disengenuous to implicitly compare an Oral tradition that lasted tens of thousands of years unmolested by outside cultures with one in the cultural melting pots of the world. Or anywhere else for that matter.

You beat me to it Hats!!! 

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jaylemurph

...and that’s how Sir Hat was responsible for the Army of Ninnies undermining Uluru, searching for Ancient Libraries. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Sir Wearer of Hats
13 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

...and that’s how Sir Hat was responsible for the Army of Ninnies undermining Uluru, searching for Ancient Libraries. 

—Jaylemurph 

If you can’t be a good example, be a terrible warning.

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Hanslune
1 hour ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

So.... an ancient group of people, descended from the pyramid builders (so let’s call them Ra Worshippers?) went underground to secretly protect their wisdom from the invaders but decided to take the coin of one invader (and notorious destroyer of hidden knowledge) the Christians? And they let another destroyer of hidden wisdom (the Arabs) write it down?

Why become an actual Christian denomination rather than simply lip-service it? Why do they hold their ancient beliefs in such disregard that they’d become Christian? I mean, the whole burning of the Library of Alexandria and lynching of Hypatia should REALLY have sent a strong signal of “keep the hell away from these people”. 

I know several Copts to include one who was trained as an Egyptologist and another who was a college professor who became a Coptic priest and now lives in California with his 'flock'. Both needless to say, were earnest  Christians with no knowledge of OK things - I asked specifically many years ago. All told I probably knew around a dozen Christian Egyptians professionally when I worked in the ME, again all were to my eye committed Christians - except one the civil engineer who specialized in ruin repairs and ancient architecture he was the only one who showed any interest in ancient things - beside the Lady who trained in Egyptology but then she spent her career in Belgium dealing with European archaeology and land use planning.

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Piney
9 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

I know several Copts to include one who was trained as an Egyptologist and another who was a college professor who became a Coptic priest and now lives in California with his 'flock'. Both needless to say, were earnest  Christians with no knowledge of OK things - I asked specifically many years ago. All told I probably knew around a dozen Christian Egyptians professionally when I worked in the ME, again all were to my eye committed Christians - except one the civil engineer who specialized in ruin repairs and ancient architecture he was the only one who showed any interest in ancient things - beside the Lady who trained in Egyptology but then she spent her career in Belgium dealing with European archaeology and land use planning.

It's pretty much a prime projection that the Copts have no oral history of AE and Scott in lying.  

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jaylemurph
16 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

If you can’t be a good example, be a terrible warning.

Yet another glimpse into the Australian psyche. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Piney
20 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

If you can’t be a good example, be a terrible warning.

Like Ken Ham!!! :o

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Hanslune
23 minutes ago, Piney said:

It's pretty much a prime projection that the Copts have no oral history of AE and Scott in lying.  

They might, its possible but then  they have been Christians for what nearly 2,000 years? I would suspect any pagan ideas or concept would have been swallowed up long ago. Mark me down as skeptical.

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Hanslune
33 minutes ago, Piney said:

It's pretty much a prime projection that the Copts have no oral history of AE and Scott in lying.  

Depends also on the source for these stories and how they were collected and who translated them and when.

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Piney
Just now, Hanslune said:

They might, its possible but then  they have been Christians for what nearly 2,000 years? I would suspect any pagan ideas or concept would have been swallowed up long ago. Mark me down as skeptical.

My people, the Lenape, "reinvented" themselves about 1811. That's when that "Grandfather Tribe" nonsense was born. Then the bands in Canada and New Jersey latched onto the Walum Olum fraud and some people in Turtle Town still insists it's real and the research debunking it is a lie.

Then you have the Apache and Navajo nonsense of "always being in the Southwest" when they came down sometime in the 12th or 13th Centuries. 

 

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Swede
3 hours ago, Scott Creighton said:

More pertinent to this question is that I have the Coptic-Egyptian oral tradition on my side. So you can ram your back-handed racist innuendo where the sun don't shine. Utterly despicable comment and no need for it whatsoever. Grow up.

SC

It would appear that you are unfamiliar with, for example, the Echo-Hawk/Mason discourse/debate. The "interpretation"/reliance upon deep-time oral histories is problematic at best. Perhaps your "studies" could benefit from maturation.

.

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Hanslune
28 minutes ago, Piney said:

My people, the Lenape, "reinvented" themselves about 1811. That's when that "Grandfather Tribe" nonsense was born. Then the bands in Canada and New Jersey latched onto the Walum Olum fraud and some people in Turtle Town still insists it's real and the research debunking it is a lie.

Then you have the Apache and Navajo nonsense of "always being in the Southwest" when they came down sometime in the 12th or 13th Centuries. 

 

My own family history is made up of stories that DNA and records say are inaccurate. Some points are true (the nearer you get to today) but the tales set in the mid 19th to late 16th aren't supported.

People make up stuff that sounds cool.

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Piney
19 minutes ago, Swede said:

It would appear that you are unfamiliar with, for example, the Echo-Hawk/Mason discourse/debate. The "interpretation"/reliance upon deep-time oral histories is problematic at best. Perhaps your "studies" could benefit from maturation.

Larry! that Mormon prick!!!!!  Goddamn traitor to his own people!!

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kmt_sesh
23 hours ago, Hanslune said:

More serious question that was brought up by our new contributor Dread.

Kmt_Sesh what sites in Egypt would you like to see re-examined or excavated for the first time?

I'm partial as I said to getting under the areas near Giza but also a detailed re-examinations of the 2-3-4-5th dynasty mastabas, pyramids and the cemetery fields associated with them plus the AE forts in 'Palestine' and in Nubia.

 

That's rather a tough one to settle on. May I say all of them? Seriously I'd like more attention on some  of the sites that include Abydos, which was of criticalt (in my opinion) are ignored, more or less. This would surely include Abydos.

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Harte
2 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

...and that’s how Sir Hat was responsible for the Army of Ninnies undermining Uluru, searching for Ancient Libraries. 

—Jaylemurph 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR96e_l1GPEIcmIC1Jh6FL

Harte

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Hanslune
49 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

That's rather a tough one to settle on. May I say all of them? Seriously I'd like more attention on some  of the sites that include Abydos, which was of criticalt (in my opinion) are ignored, more or less. This would surely include Abydos.

Tell us why Abydos and what needs to be done?

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jaylemurph
52 minutes ago, Harte said:

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR96e_l1GPEIcmIC1Jh6FL

Harte

That's not a limerick!

--Jaylemurph

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Hanslune
54 minutes ago, Harte said:

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR96e_l1GPEIcmIC1Jh6FL

Harte

Baked ninnies with garlic are excellent

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Sir Wearer of Hats

Ninny nanny nonny,

eata old scony.

fringle frangle,

tingle tangle,

ninny nanny nonny.

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jaylemurph
14 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

Tell us why Abydos and what needs to be done?

Clearly he's planning to swim to Sestos.

--Jaylemurph

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Harte
33 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

That's not a limerick!

--Jaylemurph

Surely it can't be expected

That e'er rhyming quotes be selected.

And so, it would seem

It's the same with a meme

So I won't say that I stand corrected.

Harte

Edited by Harte
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Alchopwn
On 1/16/2020 at 2:17 PM, Hanslune said:

Ah yes the lovely architecture I remember from most Arab cities. I used to called it 'Early Arab Ugly'.

Egypt has an issue where if your home is incomplete, you don't have to pay property tax.  The consequence?  Lots and lots of permanently unfinished 2 storey buildings with full bottom floors and permanently empty and incomplete upper floors, leading to the style you refer to as "Early Arab Ugly".  Maybe living in ruins gives Egyptians a sense of historic permanency?

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Scott Creighton
12 hours ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

It’s somewhat disengenuous to implicitly compare an Oral tradition that lasted tens of thousands of years unmolested by outside cultures with one in the cultural melting pots of the world. Or anywhere else for that matter.

It is well known that (largely as a result of its geography), O.K. ancient Egypt was a fairly insular society. The point here, however, is merely to demonstrate that the key element(s) of oral narratives can last intact for immense periods of time. And when this narrative relates information that is of a life or death nature then the central message of that oral narrative is highly resilient and resistant to change over centuries and millennia: 

Quote

“Our working hypothesis is that oral transmission of narrative not only helps preserve and define certain aspects of a culture, such as its bonds to its language, location and history, but is also a particularly resilient tool with which a culture might defend itself against extinction during conditions of persecution. Hence, we might expect to find that the oral tradition will resist change to the core message of a key narrative, but will nevertheless welcome, or at least tolerate, necessary or peripheral additions and deletions to accommodate changes over time--be they political, geographical, economic or social.” -

“The Vision of Theophilus: Resistance Through Orality Among the Persecuted Copts”, Egyptian Professor, Dr Fatin Morris Guirguis. From here.

At the end of the day, however, your ‘objection’ does not actually disprove the Coptic-Egyptian story of Surid. This narrative states that the ancient ancestor kings were placed within the Great Pyramid. Given the other ‘clues’ in my article which, imo, point to the veracity of the Surid story, I think there is a very good chance that what the Coptic-Egyptians tell us in this regard is true--the Big Void will be found to contain the bodies of the ancient ancestor kings.

Only time, however, may reveal the truth. If we’re very lucky.

SC

Edited by Scott Creighton

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Swede
20 hours ago, Piney said:

Larry! that Mormon prick!!!!!  Goddamn traitor to his own people!!

No, Roger C.

.

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Piney
18 minutes ago, Swede said:

No, Roger C.

:mellow: Schmuckness must run in the Gens.......

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