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Mark Sanders

God (Ask Me Anything)

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Mr Walker
9 minutes ago, Sherapy said:

While your analysis is to superficial for my tastes,  I commend you for referencing this in the first place and I agree whole heartedly that there is a lot of truth in fiction. 
 

These works are masterpieces and they are mean to stimulate discussion. 
 

 

I dint really give an analysis You could write thousands of words on that. ijust explained how  the perceptions of authors  influence the books  they write  This is also true for the bible.

 Want to understand a book? You MUST understand the writer his/her background, culture, values and beliefs, even if it is a fictional book. 

Coral Island is indeed a masterpiece like Treasure Island

Ie by my criteria it moves people and stays in their memories for life.and remains current centuries later   Lord of the flies IMO slightly less so, but it is interesting and controversial and has stood the test of time. 

For me the comparison is something like that between Dracula by Stoker and Twilight; or Frankenstein by Shelly, and The Incredible Hulk..   

Edited by Mr Walker

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Habitat
36 minutes ago, Mr Walker said:

Ithink it accurately reflected two authors views on the nature of mankind and especially of young peole.

As an historian i can see a lot of accuracy in their behaviours Eg back in the 1800s young boys were officers int he royal navy and had to lead adult sailors on board and into battles  Thus the y learned the skills and disciplines of adulthood and authority, often,before they were teenagers 

In the fifties society was beginning its disintegration which occurred over the next half a century or so.

Young boys were kept a t school under the authority of others and never had to learn the skills and disciplines needed to survive without adult supervision  

I think Ballantyne was a bit optimistic and Golding  a bt pessimistic, but i think that overall they  both got the nature of the boys about right 

News to me !

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Mr Walker
17 hours ago, Habitat said:

News to me !

lol the sons of aristocracy and upper classes were often put in the navy as young as 6 or7 They served as cabin boys and officers servants while  learning the work (literally "learning the ropes" ) They usually dined withe officers and slept in the officers quarters 

As the y grew a little older they be came midshipmen often aged round 13 or 14. some never rose above that rank but if you  passed the lieutenants exam, you could become a lieutenant as young as 16 or so

You can read about their participation in accounts of the day and see some of them in famous naval paintings.

However i first learned about them by reading naval stories about Hornblower and others like Aubrey  and   Maturin in "Master and Commander" 

 

quote

The movie Master and Commander, set in 1806, portrays several young and several older men in different officer and noncommissioned officers. Midshipman Blakeney is much younger, thirteen years old, than Midshipman Hollom, who is twenty-four. The movie portrays him as being abnormally old for this rank. It appears that the First Lieutenant Tom Pullings is about the same age as Hollom.

In the period of the Napoleonic wars, many boys went to sea as young as 11 or 12 to start building up the required sea time, or were at least put on ship's books by captains who were friends or relatives of their families to start building up the required sea time. It wasn't uncommon for boys to be placed on the books even earlier, and this practice (though technically illegal) was viewed with some benevolence, because as navigation (particularly finding longitude) became more complicated, most boys needed a few years of schooling ashore, particularly in mathematics.

https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/2b42u0/during_the_napoleonic_wars_how_young_were_naval/

 

Portrait of a midshipman, believed to be Admiral Sir William Sidney Smith as a boyMidshipman Augustus Brine (1769-1840), painted 1782. The son of Admiral James Brine. At the age of thirteen, in 1782, Brine enlisted in the Navy as a midshipman aboard the Belliqueux under the command of his father. In 1790, he was made lieutenant and, eight years later, he became a commander. During the War of 1812, he commanded the Medway and successfully captured the American brig Syran. He was named rear admiral in 1822.idshipman Augustus Brine (1769-1840), painted 1782. The son of Admiral James Brine. At the age of thirteen, in 1782, Brine enlisted in the Navy as a midshipman aboard the Belliqueux under the command…

 

 

Edited by Mr Walker

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Habitat
2 minutes ago, Mr Walker said:

lol the sons of aristocracy and upper classes were often put in the navy as young as 6 or7 They served as cabin boys and officers servants while  learning the work (literally "learning the ropes" ) They usually dined withe officers and slept in the officers quarters 

As the y grew a little older they be came midshipmen often aged round 13 or 14. some never rose above that rank but if you  passed the lieutenants exam, you could become a lieutenant as young as 16 or so

You can read about their participation in accounts of the day and see some of them in famous naval paintings.

However i first learned about them by reading naval stories about Hornblower and others like Aubrey  and   Maturin in "Master and Commander" 

I guess we would have define the age of "young boys" ?

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Mr Walker
9 minutes ago, Habitat said:

I guess we would have define the age of "young boys" ?

True

Legally they had to be 11 years of age but many were on ships of the line as officers servants younger than that.

I should perhaps have said young men but then, today they would not be considered men, but boys  

quote

David Farragut then moved with his new caretaker to Washington, D.C. On December 17, 1810, at nine years and five months old, Farragut was appointed as a midshipman in the U.S. Navy. After sailing on the USS Essex with his father for almost a year and protecting American commerce near the Atlantic northeast, Farragut found himself in the midst of war. On June 18, 1812, the United States Congress declared war against Great Britain. 

https://intriguinghistory.wordpress.com/2015/11/23/david-farragut-one-of-the-youngest-midshipmen-in-american-history/

 

Edited by Mr Walker

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jmccr8

Hi Mark

when I first read the title of this thread I thought you were telling god to ask you anything and have been reading to see if he had any questions.

jmccr8

  • Haha 4

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