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Eldorado

101yr-old told he needs his parents consent

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Eldorado

"A 101-year-old Italian man who has been in London since 1966 was asked to get his parents to confirm his identity by the Home Office after he applied to stay in the country post-Brexit.

"In what appears to be a computer glitch the Home Office thought he was a one-year-old child.

"Giovanni Palmiero was told that he needed the presence of his mother and father when he made his application for the EU settlement scheme at an advice centre in Islington, north London."

Full monty at the UK Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/feb/12/home-office-tells-man-101-his-parents-must-confirm-id

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XenoFish

Better break out the Ouija board.:lol:

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joc

If Dad was 15 and Mom was 14...possible.   Hmmmmmmmm....

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OverSword

Somehow I knew this was in England.  Remember the 90 year old lady that tesco refused to sell alcohol to because she couldn't prove she was old enough to drink?

Edited by OverSword
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Desertrat56
1 hour ago, Eldorado said:

"A 101-year-old Italian man who has been in London since 1966 was asked to get his parents to confirm his identity by the Home Office after he applied to stay in the country post-Brexit.

"In what appears to be a computer glitch the Home Office thought he was a one-year-old child.

"Giovanni Palmiero was told that he needed the presence of his mother and father when he made his application for the EU settlement scheme at an advice centre in Islington, north London."

Full monty at the UK Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/feb/12/home-office-tells-man-101-his-parents-must-confirm-id

I know that was a bad programming error that should have been fixed 21 years ago.  :lol:

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freetoroam

This is the Home office!  What chance do we have of getting anything right.

Quote

When the volunteer who helped Palmiero, a great-grandfather, scanned his passport into the EU settled status app to share the biometric data with the Home Office, the system misinterpreted his birth year as 2019 instead of 1919.

How can a computer misinterpret that?

More likely a human error, maybe a Pakistani or Nigerian working there who are still not quite brushed up on their English.

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Desertrat56
19 minutes ago, freetoroam said:

This is the Home office!  What chance do we have of getting anything right.

How can a computer misinterpret that?

More likely a human error, maybe a Pakistani or Nigerian working there who are still not quite brushed up on their English.

This was scanned data, not entered data.  It is easy how it happened.  Some one programmed the dates to always have a 2 digit year.  When 2000 came along they decided that if the year is entered as 2 digits it adds a prefix of 19 before any year greater than 35 (or some other random number in the 30's) and anything less than that is prefaced with a 20.  I wrote programs to fix that crap, it was done for the Y2K financial databases that always stored the dates as 6 digits.  Real databases store the dates as a converted number with a starting date, usually december 1, 1968 = 0 and the next date is 1 etc or what ever date the database OS went live the first time.  But microsoft databases converted from many basic small database products did not do that.

Edited by Desertrat56
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susieice

They thought a one yr old filled in an application and filed it?

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Desertrat56
13 minutes ago, susieice said:

They thought a one yr old filled in an application and filed it?

No, it is computerized.  The computer had parameters on age and the age was misinterpreted because of bad software.

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susieice
8 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

No, it is computerized.  The computer had parameters on age and the age was misinterpreted because of bad software.

So the computer showed he was one. What one yr old can fill out an application? No one questioned it? They must have talked to him to tell him he needed his parents permission unless they mailed it.

Edited by susieice
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Desertrat56
9 minutes ago, susieice said:

So the computer showed he was one. What one yr old can fill out an application? No one questioned it? They must have talked to him to tell him he needed his parents permission unless they mailed it.

He probably got a form letter.

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freetoroam
2 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

This was scanned data, not entered data.  It is easy how it happened.  Some one programmed the dates to always have a 2 digit year.  When 2000 came along they decided that if the year is entered as 2 digits it adds a prefix of 19 before any year greater than 35 (or some other random number in the 30's) and anything less than that is prefaced with a 20.  I wrote programs to fix that crap, it was done for the Y2K financial databases that always stored the dates as 6 digits.  Real databases store the dates as a converted number with a starting date, usually december 1, 1968 = 0 and the next date is 1 etc or what ever date the database OS went live the first time.  But microsoft databases converted from many basic small database products did not do that.

But this is the home office, can't you go round and fix their system? :D

Considering we are at a time where many people are going to get their papers sorted out because of Brexit, you would have thought they would have an up to date system. They can not afford to be making these errors, particularly now.

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Desertrat56
7 minutes ago, freetoroam said:

But this is the home office, can't you go round and fix their system? :D

Considering we are at a time where many people are going to get their papers sorted out because of Brexit, you would have thought they would have an up to date system. They can not afford to be making these errors, particularly now.

Yeah, if you can pay for my flight, lodging and food I would be happy to.

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freetoroam
10 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

Yeah, if you can pay for my flight, lodging and food I would be happy to.

No problem, I will get the home office to sort it out for you.

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Kaikou
21 hours ago, freetoroam said:

I will get the home office to sort it out for you.

They'd probably get that wrong as well. :unsure2:

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