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Waspie_Dwarf

Studying the Secrets of the Solar System

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Waspie_Dwarf

NASA Selects Four Possible Missions to Study the Secrets of the Solar System

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NASA has selected four Discovery Program investigations to develop concept studies for new missions. Although they’re not official missions yet and some ultimately may not be chosen to move forward, the selections focus on compelling targets and science that are not covered by NASA’s active missions or recent selections. Final selections will be made next year.

NASA’s Discovery Program invites scientists and engineers to assemble a team to design exciting planetary science missions that deepen what we know about the solar system and our place in it. These missions will provide frequent flight opportunities for focused planetary science investigations. The goal of the program is to address pressing questions in planetary science and increase our understanding of our solar system.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

UArizona-Led Mission to Io Selected as Finalist for NASA Discovery Program

 

If selected as the winner, the spacecraft mission to Jupiter's volcanic, vibrant moon will determine whether a magma ocean lurks beneath its surface.
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A University of Arizona-led mission proposal to one of Jupiter's moons is among the four finalists for the next $500 million Discovery mission, NASA announced today. The Discovery Program funds midsize principal-investigator-led spacecraft missions designed to unlock the mysteries of the solar system and our origins.

The four finalists will now embark on a one-year study before NASA expects to make its final selection in 2021.

arrow3.gif  Read More: University of Arizona

 

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NASA Selects Johns Hopkins APL-Led Discovery Mission Proposal for Further Funding

Three Other Selections Feature APL Expertise

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NASA announced today four mission proposals that will move forward for further consideration in its Discovery Program, which funds low-cost space exploration missions that do not exceed $500 million. All four mission teams feature scientists from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, including a mission to Jupiter’s volcanic moon Io that would be designed, built and co-led by APL. The other three concept missions — two to Venus and one to Neptune’s moon Triton — include APL scientific leads.

arrow3.gif  Read More: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

 

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NASA Goddard Team Selected to Design Concept for Probe of Mysterious Venus Atmosphere

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A proposed mission called DAVINCI+ could one day fly the first U.S. spacecraft since 1978 to study the atmosphere of Venus. On Feb. 13, NASA announced that DAVINCI+, named after the visionary Renaissance artist and scientist Leonardo da Vinci, is one of four teams selected under the agency’s Discovery Program to develop concept studies for new missions in this decade to various intriguing destinations in the solar system. Out of these four finalists, NASA will select one or two missions for flight by summer 2021. 

DAVINCI+ is a mission concept designed by scientists and engineers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Among its primary objectives is to explore the past and present Venus atmosphere, which is made mainly of carbon dioxide, with clouds of sulfuric acid and other unknown chemicals. Venus’ thick atmosphere, 90 times denser than Earth’s, traps heat that bakes the surface to a scorching 900 degrees Fahrenheit (480 degrees Celsius), which is hot enough to melt lead.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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