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Still Waters

Neanderthal skeleton unearthed at famous site

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Still Waters

One of the most important archaeological sites for our understanding of Neanderthals is still disgorging its secrets. A new skeleton has been found in Shanidar Cave in Iraqi Kurdistan, and it's helping reveal how the Neanderthals dealt with their dead.

Shanidar Cave is famous for what is known as the Flower Burial. Among 10 fragmentary Neanderthal skeletons unearthed there in the 1950s and 1960s, one was found with clumps of pollen mixed in with the surrounding dirt.

This was interpreted as evidence that the bones - belonging to a man aged between 30 and 45 years - had been buried with flowers; a funerary rite. It contradicted our previous understanding of Neanderthals as animalistic, uncultured and unsophisticated.

But this interpretation was a controversial one, and others put forward alternative explanations, such as the deposit of the pollen by an animal.

https://www.sciencealert.com/a-new-skeleton-at-the-flower-burial-site-is-shedding-light-on-neanderthal-funerals

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third_eye

I bet they, the Neanderthals, could sing and dance a lot too... 

~

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Myles

While primitive, they were not without feelings of their departed. 

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Nnicolette

Wow that is one longstanding tradition! I wonder what the oldest is.

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Dude Ease

Probably used flowers to hide the smell

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Jon the frog

Modern human and Neanderthals were probably both primitive 70000 ago... Neanderthal just didn't have the chance to survive elsewhere than in our genome.

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Manwon Lender
On 2/18/2020 at 4:54 AM, Still Waters said:

One of the most important archaeological sites for our understanding of Neanderthals is still disgorging its secrets. A new skeleton has been found in Shanidar Cave in Iraqi Kurdistan, and it's helping reveal how the Neanderthals dealt with their dead.

Shanidar Cave is famous for what is known as the Flower Burial. Among 10 fragmentary Neanderthal skeletons unearthed there in the 1950s and 1960s, one was found with clumps of pollen mixed in with the surrounding dirt.

This was interpreted as evidence that the bones - belonging to a man aged between 30 and 45 years - had been buried with flowers; a funerary rite. It contradicted our previous understanding of Neanderthals as animalistic, uncultured and unsophisticated.

But this interpretation was a controversial one, and others put forward alternative explanations, such as the deposit of the pollen by an animal.

https://www.sciencealert.com/a-new-skeleton-at-the-flower-burial-site-is-shedding-light-on-neanderthal-funerals

It amazing when you think about it that Neanderthals walked the earth from around 400,000 years ago up until around 40,000 years ago and during all that time changed very little.. These people walked and lived in the same locations that our direct ancestors Homo Erectus and Homo Sapiens did. While little is know about the interactions of Neanderthal, Homo Erectus, and Homo Sapiens one thing is certain they did interbreed and proof of this still exists today in the DNA of modern Humans of European and Euroasian origin. 

In addition due to new discoveries it is being presented that it was Neanderthals, not Homo Sapiens who created the first cave art work. According to new information Neanderthals made hand stencils in a cave in Spain around 66,000 years ago, long before the famous cave paintings by Homo Sapiens in France. When you put all this information together it leaves little doubt that at some point in time Neanderthals showed reverence for, and buried their dead. 

In any event they certainly were not the ignorant brutish individuals they have been portrayed as. However, they were unable to compete with Homo Sapiens for resources which most likely caused their demise around 40,000 years, possible even later.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/feb/23/neanderthals-cave-art-spain-astounding-discovery-humbles-every-human

Peace

Edited by Manwon Lender
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