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Scientists scour Tunguska for 'cosmic matter'

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aztek

nikola tesla had a different opinion

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Seti42

Most likely, it was a meteor or comet. But even literal tons of definitive proof won't sway some people.

It's a fascinating incident, though. I like reading about it, and I like sci-fi/fantasy/horror speculative fiction that incorporates it into its mythos. Hellboy, for example.

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jethrofloyd

But there was no impact crater, or in fact, any meteoric remnants at all?

 

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Robotic Jew

I like the theory that it's holy ground and an immortal was beheaded there. 

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Seti42
22 minutes ago, jethrofloyd said:

But there was no impact crater, or in fact, any meteoric remnants at all?

 

An airburst likely wouldn't leave an impact crater but would flatten acres of forest in a blast pattern...Which is what happened. Also, if whatever it was (meteor or comet) essentially evaporated, there'd be a fine sprinkling of dust over a wide area, no big chunks.

Edited by Seti42

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aztek
2 hours ago, Seti42 said:

Most likely, it was a meteor or comet. But even literal tons of definitive proof won't sway some people.

 

you are right, decades of search by soviet scientists came out empty,  not a trace of anything foreign found,  yet some still  believe there is something there, lol

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NCC1701

Recently there was an article on universetoday about meteors with a speed that is a fraction of the speed of light (Sub-Relativistic Meteors). The energy involved is so great that only a small meteor could be responsible for a enormous blast. Possibly this could have happened in Tunguska. The meteorite vapourises completely when it hits the atmosphere.

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Eldorado
1 hour ago, NCC1701 said:

Recently there was an article on universetoday about meteors with a speed that is a fraction of the speed of light (Sub-Relativistic Meteors). The energy involved is so great that only a small meteor could be responsible for a enormous blast. Possibly this could have happened in Tunguska. The meteorite vapourises completely when it hits the atmosphere.

Here it is: https://www.universetoday.com/145006/there-could-be-meteors-traveling-at-close-to-the-speed-of-light-when-they-hit-the-atmosphere-1/

And some research: "Observational Signatures of Sub-Relativistic Meteors"

At Cornell Uni: https://arxiv.org/abs/2002.01476

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skookum

Nature quickly covers up impacts craters. The first expedition wasn't until 2 decades after the event and the area was treacherous swamps. 

It would have needed to be something of considerable size for them to recover it. There probably are lots of fragments of meteor still there but buried under over a 100 years of regrowth of vegetation.

Fortunately the area was so remote casualties were almost non existent. However that has created its own issues as it is unknown if the lake was there before or after the event.

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Myles

Didn't many people report a "fireball" streaking across the sky?   That tells me it was an asteroid that probably exploded a few miles in the sky.   

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