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The death of handwriting


Eldorado
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It's not just cursive writing teachers don't want to be bothered with teaching, anymore, they don't bother teaching kids how to read analog clocks, either. There's no justification for not teaching such a simple thing, considering the zillions of public analog clocks out there. I work with young people who can't write cursive or read an analog clock and the time clock they clock in on is analog!

Edited by Hammerclaw
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The principle at my grade school was an English fanatic....she drilled us in every aspect of it.  It amazes me how little of it is understood nowadays (is that still a word?).  Vocabulary is shrinking...spelling is getting worse...grammar and sentence structure are devolving...communication is suffering greatly as a result of the loss of basic language skills.  I think it's sad, and often extremely Frustrating!    It's becoming dangerously ineffective actually!  

Edited by lightly
I spelled "and" wrong. LOL
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23 hours ago, WanderingFool0 said:

Instilling the benefits for the individual and society would be the purpose.

You guessing or know for fact?

 

23 hours ago, WanderingFool0 said:

For example, what is the purpose of exercise? To receive the physical health benefits from the exercise.

Is the purpose of smoking also to receive physical health benefits?

Purpose does not mean health benefits.

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As others have said the loss of cursive handwriting isn't by itself a bad thing. It's just one form of writing replaced by another.

Might as well decry the fact that people these days don't know how to write cuneiform on clay tablets anymore. Or don't know how to carve runes any longer.

It's not like cursive handwriting was the best thing ever or universally beneficial, my elementary school teacher was a lady who had gone to school during a time when left-handed ink pens weren't a wide spread thing yet. She was a lefty, and her teacher forced her to write with her right hand. And for years both teachers and her parents hounded her for writing sloppily, when it really wasn't her fault.

So yeah, good riddance to cursive.  

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1 hour ago, Orphalesion said:

As others have said the loss of cursive handwriting isn't by itself a bad thing. It's just one form of writing replaced by another.

Might as well decry the fact that people these days don't know how to write cuneiform on clay tablets anymore. Or don't know how to carve runes any longer.

It's not like cursive handwriting was the best thing ever or universally beneficial, my elementary school teacher was a lady who had gone to school during a time when left-handed ink pens weren't a wide spread thing yet. She was a lefty, and her teacher forced her to write with her right hand. And for years both teachers and her parents hounded her for writing sloppily, when it really wasn't her fault.

So yeah, good riddance to cursive.  

Left handed ink pens?  Is that a thing?  I started school in the early 60's and I also was not allowed to write with my left hand in school and at home my dad insisted I use my fork in my right hand.  In the 60's having good handwriting was a thing, nowadays having legible handwriting should still be necessary. 

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This is how we were taught to write back in school.  The teacher would play this tape and step out for a cigarette break.

All together boys and girls.

 

 

 

Edited by Aaron2016
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