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Eldorado

Low-carb diet may reverse, prevent dotage

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Eldorado

"You might feel a bit bloated and uncomfortable after a big meal involving lots of bread, but it turns out all those carbs may be slowing down our minds as well. Researchers at Stony Brook University say that following a low-carb diet can seriously help people experiencing age-related brain changes.

"Using neuro-imaging, the research team discovered that age-associated brain changes can actually be detected much earlier than expected — in the late 40s.

"That in and of itself is concerning, but on the bright side, these changes appear to be reversible or preventable altogether by switching to a diet that largely avoids simple carbohydrates."

Full report at StudyFinds: https://www.studyfinds.org/low-carb-diet-may-reverse-prevent-age-related-cognitive-decline/

 

“We think that, as people get older, their brains start to lose the ability to metabolize glucose efficiently, causing neurons to slowly starve, and brain networks to destabilize,” said Mujica-Parodi.

"“Thus, we tested whether giving the brain a more efficient fuel source, in the form of ketones, either by following a low-carb diet or drinking ketone supplements, could provide the brain with greater energy.

"Even in younger individuals, this added energy further stabilized brain networks.”"

At Stony Brook Uni: https://news.stonybrook.edu/newsroom/study-shows-low-carb-diet-may-prevent-reverse-age-related-effects-within-the-brain/

"Diet modulates brain network stability, a biomarker for brain aging, in young adults."

At PNAS: https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/03/02/1913042117

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and then

It's the only thing I've ever found to help me control my obesity.  When I give in to a craving now, I immediately get that drowsy effect of the carbs.  That helps moderate how often I give in to the cravings ;) 

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Kenemet

Apply with caution.

I read the article, and then read the links cited in the article.  There's a lot of links to sites that aren't hard science and that actually link to other stories on their site.  

This is the kind of thing that's very unconvincing to me.

There's a lot of caveats... it's mostly for those under 40 (which ain't me, alas.)  On the other hand, I will make some dietary changes for my husband's sake.  Not full "low carb" because that's dangerous for him.

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HandsomeGorilla

As a proponent of lower carb diets for years, I also immediately become skeptical when folks start ascribing magical traits to certain nutrition regimens, keto being no exception. It can certainly have it's benefits and can also increase insulin sensitivity in many, leaving them less prone to type 2 diabetes or outright preventing it, but there's really no miraculous properties, here. I love lower carb diets because I feel lean and dry on them at all times (holding less subcutaneous water), my mental clarity remains constant and clear, my energy levels scarcely seem to drop and it's the fastest and easiest way to lose body fat for me. Some people really don't do that well with them and have a very hard time becoming fat adapted, so it's all very individual. There's no one diet for everyone. I'm not going to tell one guy to not eat any carbs if he's not insulin resistant in the least and his body leans more towards the 'sugar burner' end of the spectrum, just the same as I'd never put a type 2 diabetic on high carbs. Why would I force the first guy to go through with it when I know he's going to be miserable and possibly just even give up? 

Sorry, way off tangent here, but we all know the pharmaceutical industry is pay to play, but so are aspects of the companies pushing certain diet plans. 

I really don't even know what the article is talking about, I didn't read it. I'm really not even sure what my point is. Sorry for making you read this far. 

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freetoroam

My gran ate lots of carbs and lived til 92, she still had her own mind til the end. But she was fit - as in like an ox fit.

 

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Piney
9 hours ago, Tuco's Gas said:

If you do decide to try the Keto Diet, it's recommended to supplement it with a new exercise program. Though many practitioners claim they lost weight without exercise.

I have a friend who lost 30 lbs in just over a month and she exercises sparingly. I'm trying to get her to lose the energy drinks, which would probably be a big help.

I'm under the opinion the only good diet is to eat right and in moderation. 

I rarely eat beef or pork (only when it comes from local farms). Lots of seafood, dairy,  eggs and chicken (which are local) and fresh veggies. My only carbs are jasmine rice and oatmeal. Once in a while I'll treat myself to plain corn chips or eat a whole jar of peanut butter. 

 

 

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simplybill
Posted (edited)

Thanks for the article, Eldorado. 

I became interested in ketones and MCT Oil when my uncle was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Around the same time as his diagnosis, Dr. Mary Newport wrote a book about her husband Steve’s diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s and her experiments with ketones that brought him back from being uncommunicative and unable to recognize his friends and relatives. He recovered significantly, but eventually had a relapse. At least they were able to enjoy each other’s company for a few extra years.

I later learned that professional bodybuilders use MCT Oil to add an extra boost of energy to their workouts. I tried it myself and saw a noticeable difference in my energy level during my workouts, but the most significant difference I noticed was the dramatic reduction of my sugar cravings. That was a nice surprise. There’s a long explanation for why that happens, but the short version is that our brain cells use ketones for fuel preferentially over glucose when ketones are available. 

Anyway, it’s good to see that brain-imaging is being used to verify the benefits of ketones. Dr. Newport’s experiments were mostly self-funded and somewhat anecdotal, so her research wasn’t taken too seriously by the more qualified researchers. It looks like her claims have been exonerated.

 

Edited by simplybill
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simplybill
Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, Tuco's Gas said:

I'm guilty, alas, of not practicing what I preach. As a long time distance runner, going back to high school and college track,  I was raised on the glories of Carbo loading. So to this day I love me some carbs: bread, rice, pasta. I still do the big bowl of Spaghetti on the eve of a race. Old habits be dying hard. But luckily I'm not overweight, and most of my friends and family deem me "too skinny."

But it sounds as though you’ve found a very healthy balance. You’re using carbs to pursue fitness instead of comfort. You have a healthy attitude about food. Keep up the good work!

Edited by simplybill

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joc
6 hours ago, Piney said:

I'm under the opinion the only good diet is to eat right and in moderation. 

:tu:

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joc

Forget Carbs...forget dieting...forget working out...forget all that nonsense...

Lose the sugar:  period...all of it...eat nothing with any kind of sugar in it...done!  And dairy products...lose that too!  

So...what is left to eat?  Fruits, vegetables, eggs, meat, fish, nuts (if you aren't allergic to them)

That is what people use to eat...before the corporations started feeding us.  

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HandsomeGorilla

I want to add this, if you do decide to try a lower carb or keto diet, please be reasonable with it. People think you just eat a bunch of meat and cheese and everything else takes care of itself. No, that's not how it works. Now, I do recommend higher fats IN THE BEGINNING to ease the transition to fat adaption. Once adapted, I highly recommend an increase in the quality of fats, the amount of fat, etc. But no, if you're just some conventional dieter, you don't get to eat 5000 calories a day of meat and cheese and expect to remain at your best. Use your head with this. Feel free to PM me or whatever. 

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