Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
UM-Bot

Can humans sense the Earth's magnetic field ?

Recommended Posts

UM-Bot

The results of a recent experiment suggest that it is not just animals that can sense our planet's magnetism.

https://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/335668/can-humans-sense-the-earths-magnetic-field

Edit: Please read the story before commenting - this is about an experiment that was conducted last year.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Piney
30 minutes ago, UM-Bot said:

Edit: Please read the story before commenting - this is about an experiment that was conducted last year.

Quote

"Our results indicate that human brains are indeed collecting and selectively processing directional input from magnetic field receptors," the researchers concluded.

The one built into our noses.

https://anthropology.net/2006/11/21/the-tiny-magnetite-compass-in-the-human-nose/

Quote

Could this be some leftover perception our ancestors once used many thousands of years ago ?

A experiment conducted by a anthropologist in California about 10 years ago showed that it was still very developed among ethnic groups who were still hunter-gatherers in recent history. But that paper is behind a paywall somewhere and I'm trying to find it.  

@Kenemet  Do you remember this or the woman's name? 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
XenoFish

Interesting. I'm just waiting for the regular group of esp believers to pop in. 

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Green Wasp

I read the story, but that still doesn't change the relevance of my comment. I read a book years ago that must have been published in the 80's, no later than the 90's. It was a collection of random facts and hypothesises like this, however I don't remember what its name was or the author. It said that iron builds up more in the nose than other parts of the body and that might give humans a sense to the northern pole.

I'm guessing this has been suspected much earlier than the 80's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
23 minutes ago, Green Wasp said:

I read the story, but that still doesn't change the relevance of my comment. I read a book years ago that must have been published in the 80's, no later than the 90's. It was a collection of random facts and hypothesises like this, however I don't remember what its name was or the author. It said that iron builds up more in the nose than other parts of the body and that might give humans a sense to the northern pole.

I'm guessing this has been suspected much earlier than the 80's.

My first comment was deleted too, and yes, the theory first started in the 80's. It's not that iron builds up in the nose, there is actually a piece of magnetite there.

Another interesting thing is all mammals travel in circles. Even people who are lost. I've always been interested in why they do that.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Seti42

I think that if humans have a magnetic sense, it's vestigial or dormant at best. We don't need it, and haven't needed it for millennia. We invented the cardinal directions, and have really easy vision-based ways of utilizing that...As well as the ability to communicate complex ideas (like spacial directions/coordinates) to each other.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenemet
4 hours ago, Piney said:

The one built into our noses.

https://anthropology.net/2006/11/21/the-tiny-magnetite-compass-in-the-human-nose/

A experiment conducted by a anthropologist in California about 10 years ago showed that it was still very developed among ethnic groups who were still hunter-gatherers in recent history. But that paper is behind a paywall somewhere and I'm trying to find it.  

@Kenemet  Do you remember this or the woman's name? 

No, though I do know an ex-pat in Australia who was working on this as a grad student.  He's involved with hapatic research (think of it as a "spidey sense") and wore a monitor for awhile that tingled true north to see if his sense of direction could be trained.  I don't remember the results now.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kleng

There's a lot that humans can subconsciously know or "sense" that science hasn't been able to prove yet. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Susanc241
2 hours ago, Piney said:

Another interesting thing is all mammals travel in circles. Even people who are lost. I've always been interested in why they do that.  

My understanding of this effect is that no one has even sized strides.  If your stride with your left leg, say, is a little bit longer than your right you will walk in a clockwise circle on terrain that has no land marks, like a desert.  The difference in stride length  only needs to be a millimetre or two and if you walk long enough you will proscribe a huge circle.  Same happens if you blindfold a person and tell them to walk in a straight line.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
L.A.T.1961
1 minute ago, Susanc241 said:

My understanding of this effect is that no one has even sized strides.  If your stride with your left leg, say, is a little bit longer than your right you will walk in a clockwise circle on terrain that has no land marks, like a desert.  The difference in stride length  only needs to be a millimetre or two and if you walk long enough you will proscribe a huge circle.  Same happens if you blindfold a person and tell them to walk in a straight line.

I am not sure stride length would make a difference? if walking over rough terrain then every stride by each leg could be different which would create a random result. Circling creates a search pattern which would be useful if unfamiliar with the local area?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
11 minutes ago, Susanc241 said:

My understanding of this effect is that no one has even sized strides.  If your stride with your left leg, say, is a little bit longer than your right you will walk in a clockwise circle on terrain that has no land marks, like a desert.  The difference in stride length  only needs to be a millimetre or two and if you walk long enough you will proscribe a huge circle.  Same happens if you blindfold a person and tell them to walk in a straight line.

Deer, free range horses and cattle, goats, mountain lions, coyotes and bison all do it though.

3 minutes ago, L.A.T.1961 said:

 Circling creates a search pattern which would be useful if unfamiliar with the local area?

A "built in" response to locate food and other resources maybe? Archaic Indians bands in the Northeast of North America had huge band territories. Now that I think about it, they were almost circular in shape.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
L.A.T.1961

The article does not make clear if the brain stimulation is in response to a detector in humans sending a signal to the brain, in response to a magnetic field, or that the magnetic field is having a direct effect on brain matter?

Magnetic fields have other effects on the brain and they can stimulate limb movement, are we saying that this is also a built in feature of the brain to allow humans to be remote controlled. :ph34r: 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180130162433.htm

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
L.A.T.1961
4 minutes ago, Piney said:

Deer, free range horses and cattle, goats, mountain lions, coyotes and bison all do it though.

A "built in" response to locate food and other resources maybe? Archaic Indians bands in the Northeast of North America had huge band territories. Now that I think about it, they were almost circular in shape.

I think you would be better off if a random exploration trip tended to bring you back to where you started. So it could be an evolved trait. Whether its magnetic guidance, daylight or something else that allows this behavior seems open to debate. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
Just now, L.A.T.1961 said:

I think you would be better off if a random exploration trip tended to bring you back to where you started. So it could be an evolved trait. Whether its magnetic guidance, daylight or something else that allows this behavior seems open to debate. 

I have a cousin who owns 14,000 acres of Pine Barrens and another land owner friend with a contiguous 10,000 I would get purposely lost in as a teen. Cut off the trail and just explore. I've had that happen several times.  I just would like to understand it. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
L.A.T.1961
11 minutes ago, Piney said:

I have a cousin who owns 14,000 acres of Pine Barrens and another land owner friend with a contiguous 10,000 I would get purposely lost in as a teen. Cut off the trail and just explore. I've had that happen several times.  I just would like to understand it. 

If it is something that is repeatable, like your own experience, then it could be embedded evolved behavior. :)

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jujo-jo
On 3/22/2020 at 3:16 PM, Piney said:

Deer, free range horses and cattle, goats, mountain lions, coyotes and bison all do it though.

A "built in" response to locate food and other resources maybe? Archaic Indians bands in the Northeast of North America had huge band territories. Now that I think about it, they were almost circular in shape.

Well I'm thinking of sharks and sea turtles... 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
XenoFish
On 3/22/2020 at 2:40 PM, Kleng said:

There's a lot that humans can subconsciously know or "sense" that science hasn't been able to prove yet. 

We know more than you think.

http://journalpsyche.org/processing-information-with-nonconscious-mind/

The recticular activating system is the filter through which information is processed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
qxcontinuum
Posted (edited)

I experienced a very interesting collective event when I was kid in general school. A couple of seconds before an earthquake we all rose up looking at each other waiting for something to happen but surprized ourself by the mass reaction. 3-4 seconds later the school started to tremble.

Edited by qxcontinuum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.