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stereologist

Invention of animal sightings

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stereologist

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2020/03/coronavirus-pandemic-fake-animal-viral-social-media-posts/?cmpid=org=ngp::mc=crm-email::src=ngp::cmp=editorial::add=Animals_20200326&rid=${Profile.CustomerKey}

 

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SCATTERED AMID A relentless barrage of news about COVID-19 case surges, quarantine orders, and medical supply shortages on Twitter this week, some happy stories softened the blows: Swans had returned to deserted Venetian canals. Dolphins too. And a group of elephants had sauntered through a village in Yunnan, China, gotten drunk off corn wine, and passed out in a tea garden.

These reports of wildlife triumphs in countries hard-hit by the novel coronavirus got hundreds of thousands of retweets. They went viral on Instagram and Tik Tok. They made news headlines. If there’s a silver lining of the pandemic, people said, this was it—animals were bouncing back, running free in a humanless world.

But it wasn’t real.

Interesting how these sweet stories are believed and passed on.

Check out the website. It has photos of what are supposed to be drunken pachyderms passed out in a farm field.

 

After Nat Geo debunked these stories they were met with anger from some readers. Here is a part of the newsletter sent out in an email.

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It’s not that surprising, then, that some readers were angry at us for debunking these photos. More than a few actually. “Wow. This is so like telling your kid ‘Santa isn’t real’ right after the child happily sat on Santa's lap in the mall,” one person posted on Facebook.

Another: “Shame on you Nat Geo! You should've let us all believe the lies that brought a little bit of sunshine to our hearts in these dark times.”

I find a lot of parallels with other debunking issues were people get angry when they find out that ESP doesn't work, and that wasn't a UFO, chemtrails are not real, etc.

 

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stereologist

There are some suggestions in the article about why people do this. Any other possibilities?

If I were a conspiracy theorist I'd be saying something like, "Follow the money" or "False flag", or something like those comments.

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BorizBadinov

@stereologist

I think for the vast majority of people life is ssdd. Same **** different day. Any hint that the world isn't mundane is a chance that someday they might encounter something to break the monotony. As an artist I create a lot of things that aren't real because a large percentage of the population wants escapism.

Once the immersion is broken by reality it loses its glamour. Like an illusionists magic trick for instance, once you know how it's done for most people it's disappointing that it's deception and not magic. Not because they really truly believe in magic perhaps, but that it was something strange and unexplained that could engage thier imagination. That's my take on it.

 

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stereologist

For those that want to look for the wonders in nature try searching for the things mentioned at this website.

https://www.atoptics.co.uk/

Spring migration is happening. Sorry this is the US and Canada but search for places where you live

https://www.hummingbird-guide.com/hummingbird-migration-map-2020.html#spring-migration-map-2020

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BorizBadinov

One of the benefits of living out in the country on a hilltop with mountain views are the spectacular sunsets. Nature truly is amazing.

I am a little surprised that my area shows nothing on the Hummingbird migration map. We usually have from 10 to 20 at the house, especially during fire season if there is a blaze in the mountains. One of my favorite things to watch in summer is the battle royal around the feeders. 

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Oniomancer
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As the normally bustling canals of Venice became deserted amid pandemic quarantines, viral social media posts claimed swans and dolphins were returning to the waters. It wasn't true. The canal water, nonetheless, is clearer because of the decrease in boat activity.

Aha! I knew it! I figured is was more likely those stirring up the sediment.

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stereologist
13 hours ago, BorizBadinov said:

One of the benefits of living out in the country on a hilltop with mountain views are the spectacular sunsets. Nature truly is amazing.

I am a little surprised that my area shows nothing on the Hummingbird migration map. We usually have from 10 to 20 at the house, especially during fire season if there is a blaze in the mountains. One of my favorite things to watch in summer is the battle royal around the feeders. 

If you are on the east coast of the US, then the hummingbirds arrive in the south and go around the mountains. They travel in the lower areas or at least are reported first in the lower terrain. It is also possible that they follow the sapsuckers which travel the mountain ridges. The holes left by the sapsuckers allows the hummingbirds to travel north ahead of flowers. 

I use the maps to set up my feeders 2 weeks or more ahead of the anticipated arrival so that I can keep some of the travelers as summer guests

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BorizBadinov
1 hour ago, stereologist said:

If you are on the east coast of the US, then the hummingbirds arrive in the south and go around the mountains. They travel in the lower areas or at least are reported first in the lower terrain. It is also possible that they follow the sapsuckers which travel the mountain ridges. The holes left by the sapsuckers allows the hummingbirds to travel north ahead of flowers. 

I use the maps to set up my feeders 2 weeks or more ahead of the anticipated arrival so that I can keep some of the travelers as summer guests

Awesome that you are so prepared. I don't really know the different types, I just like to watch them zip around.

I am in the northwest but not a coastal state. We have an orchard and many flowering plants around the house so even if we didn't use the feeders they would come. I just enjoy them coming to visit on the patio. They can brighten any day with thier antics. Trumpet vine seems to be a favorite among the flowers here.

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stereologist
8 minutes ago, BorizBadinov said:

Awesome that you are so prepared. I don't really know the different types, I just like to watch them zip around.

I am in the northwest but not a coastal state. We have an orchard and many flowering plants around the house so even if we didn't use the feeders they would come. I just enjoy them coming to visit on the patio. They can brighten any day with thier antics. Trumpet vine seems to be a favorite among the flowers here.

There are many more species out West, but many of them look similar. One of the interesting western ones that are seen in the fall in the east is the rufous. For some reason a few will track diagonally across the US instead of heading south. Sounds like you live in a beautiful spot. Stay safe.

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BorizBadinov
11 minutes ago, stereologist said:

There are many more species out West, but many of them look similar. One of the interesting western ones that are seen in the fall in the east is the rufous. For some reason a few will track diagonally across the US instead of heading south. Sounds like you live in a beautiful spot. Stay safe.

I believe that is one of the types that I usually see from looking at pictures. Likewise stay safe. 

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