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Waspie_Dwarf

Rethinking cosmology

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Waspie_Dwarf

Rethinking cosmology: Universe expansion may not be uniform

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Astronomers have assumed for decades that the Universe is expanding at the same rate in all directions. A new study based on data from ESA’s XMM-Newton, NASA’s Chandra and the German-led ROSAT X-ray observatories suggests this key premise of cosmology might be wrong.

arrow3.gif  Read More: ESA

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

@Tuco's Gas Firstly as a moderator:

From the rules:

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2c. Plagiarism and copyright: If you quote text from an external web site then please always provide a source link. Members are asked to copy only as much as is necessary when quoting material from external sources, do not copy and paste entire articles or web pages.

Please provide links to material you quote.

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Waspie_Dwarf
9 minutes ago, Tuco's Gas said:

I thought the discovery of Dark Energy about 20 years ago dispelled previous notions of universally symmetrical or equal expansion?

 

Here's an excerpt from an article describing the effects of DE....

 

Studying the effect of dark energy on large-scale structure involves measuring subtle distortions in the shapes of galaxies arising from the bending of space by intervening matter, a phenomenon known as “weak lensing.” At some point in the last few billion years, dark energy became dominant in the universe and thus prevented more galaxies and clusters of galaxies from forming. This change in the structure of the universe is revealed by weak lensing. Another measure comes from counting the number of clusters of galaxies in the universe to measure the volume of space and the rate at which that volume is increasing. The goals of most observational studies of dark energy are to measure its equation of state (the ratio of its pressure to its energy density), variations in its properties, and the degree to which dark energy provides a complete description of gravitational physics.

Now as an ordinary member:

Nowhere in your quoted article (which is from Britannica: HERE ) does it mention anything to do with the isotropy hypothesis. No where does it mention a lack of symmetry. It simply does not say what you claim it does.

What it is ACTUALLY about is measuring dark energy by measuring the gravitational lensing of massive objects.

Whilst you have ably demonstrated your ability to google I'm afraid you have not demonstrated your ability to understand either the original post OR the article you quoted.

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joc
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Before challenging the widely accepted cosmology model, which provides the basis for estimating the cluster distances, Konstantinos and colleagues first looked at other possible explanations. Perhaps, there could be undetected gas or dust clouds obscuring the view and making clusters in a certain area appear dimmer. The data, however, do not support this scenario.

In some regions of space the distribution of clusters could be affected by bulk flows, large-scale motions of matter caused by the gravitational pull of extremely massive structures such as large cluster groups. This hypothesis, however, also seems unlikely. Konstantinos adds that the findings took the team by surprise. 

 

ESA

This is what I really love about it all...what they thought and what they found are all very interesting...but..Hey, let's just don't go with what we found...let's explore all the data to the Nth possibility first...that's what I think is so great about Cosmology and science in general.  There are reasons things go bump in the night. Let's explore them all and compare with the data we have.

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Imaginarynumber1
On 4/8/2020 at 5:15 PM, Tuco's Gas said:

As I'm pretty sure your OP is old news.

 

Paper was just published this month

https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.03305

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DieChecker
Posted (edited)

I think I suggested something similar to this a couple months, to a year, back. That perhaps the expansion of space is non'regular and actually is bumpy. I thought such could explain the reports of "faster then light" observations, as the expansion variable would not be a known constant.

Edited by DieChecker

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bison

If the the uneven expansion of the universe is confirmed, and dark energy is the cause, it raises another interesting question. Why isn't dark energy evenly distributed, on this very large scale, and how did it become unevenly distributed? 

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Damien99
On 4/10/2020 at 2:52 AM, DieChecker said:

I think I suggested something similar to this a couple months, to a year, back. That perhaps the expansion of space is non'regular and actually is bumpy. I thought such could explain the reports of "faster then light" observations, as the expansion variable would not be a known constant.

I thought nothing moved faster than light?

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egodiot

And why not?
It�s big & cold out there.
Get near something hot & things change.
#thermodynamics

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DieChecker
18 hours ago, Damien99 said:

I thought nothing moved faster than light?

I believe theres been several objects detected that appeared to exceed the speed of light. Some quasars, I believe. But, when they account for expansion of the universe, they drop below lightspeed. However a very few still appeared to exceed lightspeed, even with with expansion included. This might explain such irregularities.

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