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Waspie_Dwarf

Earth-Size, Habitable Zone Planet Found

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Waspie_Dwarf

Earth-Size, Habitable Zone Planet Found Hidden in Early NASA Kepler Data

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A team of transatlantic scientists, using reanalyzed data from NASA’s Kepler space telescope, has discovered an Earth-size exoplanet orbiting in its star's habitable zone, the area around a star where a rocky planet could support liquid water.

Scientists discovered this planet, called Kepler-1649c, when looking through old observations from Kepler, which the agency retired in 2018. While previous searches with a computer algorithm misidentified it, researchers reviewing Kepler data took a second look at the signature and recognized it as a planet. Out of all the exoplanets found by Kepler, this distant world – located 300 light-years from Earth – is most similar to Earth in size and estimated temperature.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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DieChecker

We've found these worlds. Now we need to figure out how to get there.

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llegendary

The radiation from the red dwarf would kill off all life.

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jbondo
On 4/21/2020 at 11:22 PM, llegendary said:

The radiation from the red dwarf would kill off all life.

Yeah, life as we know it. But, what if life there actually thrived on radiation, like the Radiotrophic fungi here on earth?

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Waspie_Dwarf
11 minutes ago, jbondo said:

Yeah, life as we know it. But, what if life there actually thrived on radiation, like the Radiotrophic fungi here on earth?

The flares from some red dwarfs are sufficiently powerful to destroy complex molecules like DNA. Life around such stars is unlikely to thrive because the complex chemistry necessary for life is unlikely to occur in the first place.

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jbondo
On 4/24/2020 at 2:02 PM, Waspie_Dwarf said:

The flares from some red dwarfs are sufficiently powerful to destroy complex molecules like DNA. Life around such stars is unlikely to thrive because the complex chemistry necessary for life is unlikely to occur in the first place.

If we are specifically talking about flares, then yes it would be an issue. However, if something was deep enough in such a planet's ocean.....Furthermore, we don't know how powerful these flares would be.That said, I wasn't disagreeing with you, just giving a for instance.

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DieChecker

From what I remember water is really good at reducing radiation. Assuming such solar flares wouldn't be throwing enough heat to prevent liquid water. Then an ocean would still be a possible choice for life.

Example article of water versus radiation...

https://space.stackexchange.com/questions/1336/what-thickness-depth-of-water-would-be-required-to-provide-radiation-shielding-i

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according to a report on the topic prepared for the DoE back in 1977, a layer of water 7 centimeters thick reduces the ionizing radiation (rays and particles) transmitted through it by half (the remainder is captured or moderated to non-ionizing energy levels, mainly heat).

 

Edited by DieChecker

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