Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Eldorado

Lost Viking mountain pass yields treasures

Recommended Posts

Eldorado

"During 2011’s particularly warm summer, archaeologists surveying Lendbreen for the first time found centuries-old horse dung littered all over the ground and ancient artifacts melting out of the ice.

"Among those early finds was a 1700-year-old tunic, the oldest piece of clothing ever discovered in Norway and one that is puzzlingly complete, perhaps tossed off by a traveler in the delirious late stages of hypothermia.

"Now, after several more explorations of the site, researchers have discovered more than 1,000 artifacts including scraps of wool clothing and leather shoes, fragments of sleds, horseshoes and walking sticks.

"A new analysis of artifacts from the ice patch, published today in the journal Antiquity, offers new information about how this mountain pass was used over time—and some ominous clues about why it was eventually abandoned."

Full story at the Smithsonian Mag: Link

Research at Cambridge Uni: Link

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Cookie Monster
15 minutes ago, Eldorado said:

"During 2011’s particularly warm summer, archaeologists surveying Lendbreen for the first time found centuries-old horse dung littered all over the ground and ancient artifacts melting out of the ice.

"Among those early finds was a 1700-year-old tunic, the oldest piece of clothing ever discovered in Norway and one that is puzzlingly complete, perhaps tossed off by a traveler in the delirious late stages of hypothermia.

"Now, after several more explorations of the site, researchers have discovered more than 1,000 artifacts including scraps of wool clothing and leather shoes, fragments of sleds, horseshoes and walking sticks.

"A new analysis of artifacts from the ice patch, published today in the journal Antiquity, offers new information about how this mountain pass was used over time—and some ominous clues about why it was eventually abandoned."

Full story at the Smithsonian Mag: Link

Research at Cambridge Uni: Link

I liked the bit about how they thought the wearer of the tunic had hypothermia.

In the later stages people feel incredibly hot (making them undress) and get the urge to find somewhere to hide. Its the body preparing for hibernation but with the exception of Australian Aborigines most of us have lost our evolutionary edge with hibernation so it kills us.

An interesting find, maybe it was an outlaw hiding in the mountains.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DieChecker

I was just reading about this. I was wondering if the area was mostly ice free in the 4th century to 10th century, and later iced over much more. There had to be some permanent ice since objects dating to the 4th century have been preserved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Seti42

This is really cool. I like reading about everyday item finds in archaeology almost more than grand temples, elaborate burials for the wealthy, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mdbuilder

I hope everyone grasps the implications relative to the hype over 'global warming'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Myles

One of the few positives of global warming.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.