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Rickety

Anybody ever notice this sine wave?

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Rickety

I was checking out Google Sky today and just noticed this sine wave in the infrared spectrum of the universe. There seem to be two sine waves that are around 300 degrees out of phase, one with about half the amplitude of the other. Doing the math they come out to around 11.574µHz but without a definitive scale I can't really calculate the amplitude, period, or wavelength. Has anyone noticed it before? Maybe someone who's better at trigonometry or AC electricity could do a better job than I can.

 

universe sine waves.png

EDIT: The period is 24-hours... sorry... I just realized my blunder.

Edited by Rickety
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Waspie_Dwarf

It's not a sine wave. It is the disk of the galaxy represented in two dimensions. Once you realise that the reason it has a period of 24 hours should be clear.

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XenoFish

It's the Galactic Roller Coaster.

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OverSword

Proof of the matrix.

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19_Kilo
7 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

It's not a sine wave. It is the disk of the galaxy represented in two dimensions. Once you realise that the reason it has a period of 24 hours should be clear.

Can you give a link for that? I'm having trouble understanding how that pic is what you claim.  Thanks.

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Emma_Acid

That is the disk of the Milky Way. The rotation of the earth (and solar system) sits at a 60 degree angle to the plane of the galaxy, so the rotation of the earth means the centre of the galaxy moves up and down in relation to the rotation of the earth. That is why the "sine" perfectly fits a 24-hour period.

 

DSSO7TyXUAAPQeR.jpg

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Rickety
16 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

It's not a sine wave. It is the disk of the galaxy represented in two dimensions. Once you realise that the reason it has a period of 24 hours should be clear.

 

4 hours ago, Emma_Acid said:

That is the disk of the Milky Way. The rotation of the earth (and solar system) sits at a 60 degree angle to the plane of the galaxy, so the rotation of the earth means the centre of the galaxy moves up and down in relation to the rotation of the earth. That is why the "sine" perfectly fits a 24-hour period.

 

DSSO7TyXUAAPQeR.jpg

Ah! That makes more sense now. Would that also account for the smaller "sine wave" that's about 300 degrees out of phase and a lower amplitude though?

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Waspie_Dwarf
9 hours ago, 19_Kilo said:

Can you give a link for that? I'm having trouble understanding how that pic is what you claim.  Thanks.

It doesn't really need a link, just a very basic understanding of astronomy and geometry. 

Think of that image stretched and placed over a sphere. What you then get is a circle. That circle is the disk of the galaxy as viewed from inside the galaxy.

Just as with maps of the Earth, perspective is altered when you try to represent a 3 dimensional, spherical object (whetherit is the Earth's surface or the sky), on a two dimensional, flat surface.

The milky way looks like a sine wave in this image for the same reason that if you draw an aircraft's flight path across, say the Atlantic, on a flat map it will be a curve not a straight line.

 

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Waspie_Dwarf
9 hours ago, 19_Kilo said:

Can you give a link for that? I'm having trouble understanding how that pic is what you claim.  Thanks.

If you need a link though, here is a 2007 piece from Scientific American

It has an infrared image of the milky way using a different projection. It also has galactic North at the top instead of celestial north (which is the point in the sky above Earth's north pole).

Using this projection the sine wave appearance disappears altogether. 

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19_Kilo
1 hour ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

It doesn't really need a link, just a very basic understanding of astronomy and geometry. 

Think of that image stretched and placed over a sphere. What you then get is a circle. That circle is the disk of the galaxy as viewed from inside the galaxy.

Just as with maps of the Earth, perspective is altered when you try to represent a 3 dimensional, spherical object (whetherit is the Earth's surface or the sky), on a two dimensional, flat surface.

The milky way looks like a sine wave in this image for the same reason that if you draw an aircraft's flight path across, say the Atlantic, on a flat map it will be a curve not a straight line.

 

Uh huh. Just as I thought. The sine wave in the OP doesn't exist.

Edited by 19_Kilo

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19_Kilo
5 hours ago, Emma_Acid said:

That is the disk of the Milky Way. The rotation of the earth (and solar system) sits at a 60 degree angle to the plane of the galaxy, so the rotation of the earth means the centre of the galaxy moves up and down in relation to the rotation of the earth. That is why the "sine" perfectly fits a 24-hour period.

 

DSSO7TyXUAAPQeR.jpg

 

1 hour ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

If you need a link though, here is a 2007 piece from Scientific American

It has an infrared image of the milky way using a different projection. It also has galactic North at the top instead of celestial north (which is the point in the sky above Earth's north pole).

Using this projection the sine wave appearance disappears altogether. 

Waspie already said all that earlier.  

But you're both wrong.

The Galaxy also spins and moves. It's also not nearly as organized as first thought.

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Emma_Acid
On 5/22/2020 at 4:08 PM, 19_Kilo said:

 

Waspie already said all that earlier.  

But you're both wrong.

The Galaxy also spins and moves. It's also not nearly as organized as first thought.

Well firstly, I think I might be coming at it from the wrong angle, I need @Waspie_Dwarf to confirm. I thought it was because of the movement of the earth in relation to the plain of the galaxy, but I think the actual answer is because the plain of the galaxy is at an angle to the equatorial plain of the earth. As the galaxy plain surrounds the earth, when it is "unwrapped", it creates a sine wave shape.

So I was wrong, its not the movement, but it is to do with the angle. As I said, I need Waspie to confirm.

The whole "galaxy spins and moves" and "not as organised" thing is irrelevant.

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Emma_Acid
On 5/22/2020 at 2:46 PM, Rickety said:

 

Ah! That makes more sense now. Would that also account for the smaller "sine wave" that's about 300 degrees out of phase and a lower amplitude though?

Yes.

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Waspie_Dwarf
On 5/22/2020 at 4:08 PM, 19_Kilo said:

 

Waspie already said all that earlier.  

But you're both wrong.

The Galaxy also spins and moves. It's also not nearly as organized as first thought.

Total nonsense.

The galaxy DOES rotate,  but it takes a lot longer than 24 hours to do so. About 225 - 250 million years longer in fact. The movement and rotation of the galaxy are so slow as to be totally irrelevant to this image. 

You insist on links so come on, provide one to back your claim.

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