Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Kenemet

MedRxIv papers

Recommended Posts

Kenemet

There's a million of them (well, not really, but a lot of them.)  Rather than lumber one forum with a whole lot of posts, I'm posting papers I find interesting here.

Note: These are scientific papers and going through some sort of review (preprint) or have been accepted or are new publications.  These are not MY papers.  In the case where they get jargon-y, I'll try to add a "translation."

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Kenemet

My first candidate:  Low testosterone levels predict clinical adverse outcomes in SARS‐CoV‐2 pneumonia patients

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/andr.12821?af=R (accepted for publication)

Quote

Abstract
Background
The pandemic of new severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) due to coronavirus (CoV) 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2) has stressed the importance of effective diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of clinical worsening and mortality. Epidemiological data showing a differential impact of SARS‐CoV‐2 infection on women and men has suggested a potential role for testosterone (T) in determining gender‐disparity in the SARS‐CoV‐2 clinical outcomes.

Objectives
To estimate the association between T level and SARS‐CoV‐2 clinical outcomes (defined as conditions requiring transfer to higher or lower intensity of care or death) in a cohort of patients admitted in the Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU)

The title and abstract say it all -- for men, low testosterone (which occurs in older men) means more risk for severe outcomes or death.  This does eliminate one issue - wondering if the lower rate of adverse outcomes in women was testosterone related.  The answer is "apparently not."

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OverSword
Posted (edited)

Ughh.   Reading.  I know you are knowledgeable in this area so thank you Kenemet. 

Edited by OverSword
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenemet
12 minutes ago, OverSword said:

Ughh.   Reading.  I know you are knowledgeable in this area so thank you Kenemet. 

I like reading this stuff.  I know it's nuts, but I enjoy it.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bison

The anti-inflammatory effects of testosterone, and the lack of this effect in those men with low testosterone, may explain the extent of adverse outcomes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenemet

The CDC uses a set of parameters in their modeling for forecasts.  They've released a paper on the five scenarios that they use.

(note: these are based on observational data.  They're not necessarily the best or what everyone's using, but in making a model you have to start with some assumptions and it's best if you standardize them)

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/planning-scenarios.html

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenemet
What kind of conditions cause a return to the hospital after being discharged from Covid-19? As you might expect, COPD (obstructive pulmonary disease) but also high blood pressure -- the typical complaint for readmission is "trouble breathing." They noted a possible association between these patients NOT getting a higher dose of anticoagulants but the data there isn't clear.
 
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenemet

An interesting one -- how risky is it to take care of Covid-19 patients?  Thanks to good epidemiological practice, "not very."

Quote

This study demonstrates that overall rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection among asymptomatic healthcare workers in a large healthcare system of a metropolitan city in the United States was 3.9%

• The rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection among healthcare workers who provided direct care to COVID-19 patients was 5.4% whereas it was 0.6% among those healthcare workers who did not provide direct care to COVID-19 patients

• There was no difference in SARS-CoV-2 positivity rate for different job categories of healthcare workers who provided direct care to COVID-19 patients

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.05.21.20107581v1.full.pdf

Relatively read-able by most folks.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenemet
Posted (edited)

WARNING:  BAD SCIENCE!

I'd recently wondered why there was such a push about taking Vitamin C to prevent Covid-19, given the total lack of studies in the scientific literature showing that it was useful.  I did find a paper (referenced here: https://figshare.com/articles/COVID19-CitrusFruits-MolecularDocking_pdf/12365444) that says "gosh, Vitamin C is better than Chlorquinine and Remdesivir for Covid-19.

It's... really bad.

What makes it bad?  it's a theoretical paper by an engineer (so no medical experience that is noted) about cell chemistry (sort of) saying that Zinc plus Vitamin C are absolutely effective against Covid-19, based on self-reporting by Twitter users who said they had the disease and cured themselves of it.  He says it should be studied "in vitro" (which most of the VitC+zinc fans don't seem to have noticed.)  Worse yet, he says the best way is through consuming fruits and vegetables, ignoring the fact that the quantities vary wildly between one apple and the next (different amounts of sunshine on the fruit, different tree, different picking time, etc, etc, can all impact the amount of vitamins and bioflavins in any single fruit or vegetable.)

So, no.  Self reporting on Twitter isn't any basis for a good study (we don't know if they actually had it or even if these are real people and not bots.)  And an "I have a dream" paper is no substitute for "we worked at this hospital and we saw 400 patients and here's what we observed in the medical records."

Edited by Kenemet
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenemet

Statistics that are real, but are sure to cause a fight in your social contacts:

Quote

Aggregated deaths from COVID-19 in these 40 states and the District of Columbia have reached new highs for all groups:

  • 1 in 2,000 Black Americans has died (or 50.3 per 100,000)

  • 1 in 4,300 Asian and Latino Americans has died (or 22.7 and 22.9, respectively, per 100,000)

  • 1 in 4,700 White Americans has died (or 20.7 per 100,000)

We could not calculate a similar aggregated mortality rate for Indigenous Americans, due to limited and uneven data. (Many states report Indigenous deaths in a broader “Other” race category). However, dramatic mortality disparities exist for Indigenous residents in the states of Arizona and New Mexico. Both of these states contain portions of the Navajo Nation, where the virus outbreak has been devastating. In Arizona, the Indigenous mortality rate is more than five times the rate for all other groups, while in New Mexico, the rate exceeds seven times all other groups. With 266 known deaths among Indigenous residents, these two states alone account for two-thirds of all known Indigenous deaths.

https://www.apmresearchlab.org/covid/deaths-by-race

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.