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Damien99

Questions about defined universe

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Damien99

Hi I am having trouble understanding  this article it talks about spins in différents galaxies and different axis in the universe but the title to me sounds as though the universe have a defined struxture in which sounds to me like meaning how big it can grow. Can someone please clarify it down a little in more layman terms?

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/phys.org/news/2020-06-patterns-spiral-galaxies-universe.amp
 

Title :Study finds that patterns formed by spiral galaxies show that the universe may have a defined structure

 

thank you

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Waspie_Dwarf

I see that you are still ignoring advice, googling stuff you don't understand then, rather than doing any research and actually learning anythin,g running straight here expecting to be spoon fed answers.

Go read a basic astronomy book. You will never learn if you just google and ask for answers. Ypu need to put the work in, why should everyone else do the thinking for you?

Right, now I've wasted my time yet again, trying to get you to think for yourself...

 

There really isn't much here to understand. If the universe had a totally random structure then the orientation of spiral galaxies should be random. It isn't.

Since the orientation of spiral galaxies isn't random then the universe must have some defined structure to it.

This non-random alignment gets more significant the more distant the galaxies are that you study. Since the more distant the galaxies are, the earlier in the histroy of the universe you are seeing them, this means that the universe must have had a more ordered structure in the past than it does now.

The most likely explanation for these observations is that the universe was spinning early in it's history.

That's it. That is all there is to understand. It's all explained very well in the article you linked to.

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Damien99
1 minute ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

I see that you are still ignoring advice, googling stuff you don't understand then, rather than doing any research and actually learning anythin,g running straight here expecting to be spoon fed answers.

Go read a basic astronomy book. You will never learn if you just google and ask for answers. Ypu need to put the work in, why should everyone else do the thinking for you?

Right, now I've wasted my time yet again, trying to get you to think for yourself...

 

There really isn't much here to understand. If the universe had a totally random structure then the orientation of spiral galaxies should be random. It isn't.

Since the orientation of spiral galaxies isn't random then the universe must have some defined structure to it.

This non-random alignment gets more significant the more distant the galaxies are that you study. Since the more distant the galaxies are, the earlier in the histroy of the universe you are seeing them, this means that the universe must have had a more ordered structure in the past than it does now.

The most likely explanation for these observations is that the universe was spinning early in it's history.

That's it. That is all there is to understand. It's all explained very well in the article you linked to.

Ok so by structure they do not mean structure as a maximum structure it can grow expand into. 

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Peter B
50 minutes ago, Damien99 said:

Ok so by structure they do not mean structure as a maximum structure it can grow expand into. 

No.

Read again the article you linked. It was consistently talking about what the universe was like when it was younger. Note, in particular, that the phrase "early universe" appears four times in the article. This is talking about how the universe today is less organised than it was in the past, but it says nothing about the future of the universe.

Just a thought, but would I be correct in guessing that English is not your first language? If it is, then I apologise. But if not, consider that some words in English may not have exactly the same meaning as they do in your native language. In the context of this article, "defined structure" relates to the measured asymmetry of the spin of galaxies in the early universe, and how that asymmetry is gradually reducing over time. It is nothing to do with some theoretical maximum size of the universe.

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Damien99
22 minutes ago, Peter B said:

No.

Read again the article you linked. It was consistently talking about what the universe was like when it was younger. Note, in particular, that the phrase "early universe" appears four times in the article. This is talking about how the universe today is less organised than it was in the past, but it says nothing about the future of the universe.

Just a thought, but would I be correct in guessing that English is not your first language? If it is, then I apologise. But if not, consider that some words in English may not have exactly the same meaning as they do in your native language. In the context of this article, "defined structure" relates to the measured asymmetry of the spin of galaxies in the early universe, and how that asymmetry is gradually reducing over time. It is nothing to do with some theoretical maximum size of the universe.

Thank you 

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bison

The sky chart in the article linked in the original post is interesting. The quadrupole structure of galactic spin directions seems to be two sets of opposite, or nearly opposite points on the sky. As nearly as I can tell, one set appears to be oriented on the constellations Taurus and Serpens, the other on Capricorn and Cancer. 

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