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Still Waters

Rare photo of iceberg 'that sank the Titanic'

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Still Waters

A photograph of an iceberg that “most likely” sank the Titanic has emerged more than 100 years after the disaster took place.

It was taken by the captain of another passenger ship crossing the Atlantic, less than two days before the Titanic went down.

The black and white picture was taken by seaman W Wood – a keen photographer – while he was serving as captain on board the SS Etonian on 12 April, 1912.

Capt Wood made a note of his geographic coordinates when he saw the iceberg – they were almost the same for when the Titanic struck an iceberg 40 hours later and sank.

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/rare-photo-iceberg-most-likely-143347528.html

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Myles

That is pretty cool.   

Found it a little amusing when the article read - "There were never any photographs taken on board the Titanic of the iceberg".    Of course not, they didn't see it in time.   

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freetoroam
Quote

The black and white picture was taken by seaman W Wood – a keen photographer – while he was serving as captain on board the SS Etonian on 12 April, 1912.

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/rare-photo-iceberg-most-likely-143347528.html

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Quote

theberg.jpg

This is a scanned copy of the photographic print of the iceberg with which the RMS TITANIC supposedly collided on April 14, 1912 at latitude 41-46N, longitude 50-14W.

This print was in possession of Captain De Carteret, the Captain of the Cable ship MINIA, reportedly stated that this was the only iceberg near the scene of the collision.

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unberg.jpg

This is a scanned copy of the photographic print of the iceberg with which the RMS TITANIC supposedly collided on April 14, 1912 at latitude 41-46N, longitude 50-14W.

This iceberg was photographed by the chief steward of the liner Prinze Adelbert on the morning of April 15, 1912, just a few miles south of where the Titanic went down.

https://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageName=iipHowLargeWasTheIcebergThatSankTheTITANIC

How many 'this is the iceberg" pics are there out there? 

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susieice
Posted (edited)

The picture taken by Prinze Adelbert went up for auction in 2015. The picture is black and white but there was red paint on the one side of the berg, allegedly from the Titanic's hull.

https://www.livescience.com/52551-titanic-iceberg-photo-auction.html

Edited by susieice
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Myles
1 hour ago, freetoroam said:

.

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How many 'this is the iceberg" pics are there out there? 

I'd put my money on the bottom pic.   Only because it matched the description the lookout of the Titanic gave.    He would have gotten a good look albeit a bit too late.

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TigerBright19
Posted (edited)

Hard to tell which iceberg was 'the iceberg' as the Titanic had steamed slowly away from the scene after the collision.  Passenger Mr. Taylor said - "I felt the boat rise and it seemed to me that she was riding over the ice. I ran out on deck and then I could see ice. It was a veritable sea of ice and the boat was rocking over it. I should say that parts of the iceberg were 80 feet high, but it had been broken into sections probably by our ship."  4th officer Boxhall looked at the iceberg after it passed the ship (after it had broken apart).  He said - "It seemed to me to be just a small black mass not rising very high out of the water......it seemed to me to be very, very low lying......It looked to me to be very, very low in the water........I do not think the thing extended above the ship's rail.........I am not sure of seeing it; that is what I say, I would not swear to seeing it, but I fancied seeing this long-lying growler.......It looked to me as if it was very, very low."

 

 

iceber2.png

 

Edited by Aaron2017
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freetoroam

The photo from the ss Etonian is going up for £12,000

Quote

The photo and the letter are now being sold at auctioneers Henry Aldridge and Son of Devizes, Wilts, for an estimated £12,000 ($15,000).

The photo from the Prinz Adalbert  went up for:

Quote

Henry Aldridge and Son is auctioning the photo on Saturday (Oct. 24). It's expected to fetch between $15,000 and $20,000, Aldridge said.

Same auctioneers.

But it is the iceberg from the ss Minia which Biggs thinks may  have been the one.

Quote

These reports roughly match the dimensions of the iceberg in Carteret's photo, measuring about 394 feet long by 98 feet high (120 m by 30 m), Bigg said.

Bigg learned about the two iceberg photos. The other, taken by Captain William George Squares de Carteret of the SS Minia,

"I personally think the Carteret photo is the more likely candidate," largely because of the shape and dimensions, Bigg told Live Science.

https://www.livescience.com/52551-titanic-iceberg-photo-auction.html

 

Note Aldridge (the auctioneer)  said:

Quote

Aldridge agreed that there's "no definitive answer" about which iceberg is the true culprit. "What's interesting with this one is the provenance of the lot," 

https://www.livescience.com/52551-titanic-iceberg-photo-auction.html

 

The provenance of the lot (2) until the one from the ss Etonian showed up? 

BUT BUT BUT

this photo has been sold before in 2012:

Quote

Now, one hundred years later, a photo that may the only surviving print showing that infamous chunk of ice is going up for auction. It’s expected to fetch up to $10,000.

The 9.75×8-inch photograph was snapped by Captain W. F. Wood of a ship named S. S. Etonian, two days prior to the event.

The photo is being sold by American auction house RR Auction, which lists the print’s title as, “The Iceberg that Sunk Titanic.”

https://petapixel.com/2012/11/27/photo-of-iceberg-that-sank-the-titanic-to-be-auctioned-expected-to-fetch-10k/

 

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Torviking

The thing that bugs me about the Titanic disaster is why is it always called mysterious? The ship hit an iceberg and sadly sank,where is the mystery. Just a point, nothing really to do with this, but I live about 2mins from Ismays house and We Smiths.

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spud the mackem

It matters not which iceberg caused the sinking , I've seen many icebergs on the Rotterdam to Baltimore run ,and back especially in winter around the Grand Banks area .The Titanic should Never have been going at full speed in sea containing Icebergs , I.M.O the Duty Officer on the ships bridge ,and the Captain were fully responsible , regardless whether the Owner wanted a record voyage .

When you are within 10/15 miles of icebergs the sea calms and there is an oily look about it , and the cold increases dramatically ,and sometimes it turns very foggy ,  so the Titanic Officers should have realised this and rang down for "dead slow", as it takes a ship of that size about 7 to 10 miles to stop from full speed . and they had no radar . On a ship The Captains word is law and supersedes the Owner or anyone else , so although I sympathise , to put it bluntly they were Bloody Stupid and it cost many lives . 

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Oniomancer
On 6/16/2020 at 10:34 AM, Myles said:

That is pretty cool.   

Found it a little amusing when the article read - "There were never any photographs taken on board the Titanic of the iceberg".    Of course not, they didn't see it in time.   

Not to mention it was at night.

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Michelle

And the binoculars were in a locker no one had a key to.

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jbondo
20 hours ago, Torviking said:

The thing that bugs me about the Titanic disaster is why is it always called mysterious? The ship hit an iceberg and sadly sank,where is the mystery. Just a point, nothing really to do with this, but I live about 2mins from Ismays house and We Smiths.

It's a bit more complicated than that. The hull was weakened by a coal fire a few weeks before the ship sank. Since the ships of the day only had a single hull, the Titanic was severely compromised by the heat of the fire. This is according to eyewitness testimony of said fire and photos that were discovered not long ago.

In other words, had there never been a fire, the ship may very well have shoved the iceberg aside at the very least. Why would it operate in waters known to have drifting ice if it weren't built to handle it?

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Robotic Jew
On 6/16/2020 at 5:53 PM, Torviking said:

The thing that bugs me about the Titanic disaster is why is it always called mysterious? The ship hit an iceberg and sadly sank,where is the mystery. Just a point, nothing really to do with this, but I live about 2mins from Ismays house and We Smiths.

The mystery is why Rose didn't let Jack onto the door!

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jethrofloyd
On 6/16/2020 at 11:53 PM, Torviking said:

The ship hit an iceberg and sadly sank,where is the mystery.

They said the ship was unsinkable. So how could the Titanic have sunk to the bottom of the Atlantic just four days into its maiden voyage?

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Torviking

Because the bulkheads did not reach to the main deck. So one overflowed into the other. Jeeeze.

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