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Leon G

[Research] Marine corps US Army

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Leon G

Im looking for someone who was or is in the US Marines. And can help me with info like how things work when you enlist.

I know they have a 13 week training course and what test they have to do to get qualified (the fysical test)

But what happens before that, or the first day the actualy start the boot camp. When they get there first assignement as a full fledged Marine. 

What is on the dog tags, why 2 off them. 

What happens on there last day (if they discharge or get discharged) 

 

Im working on a story set up build with a main character that was a marine. During the story their are some flashbacks to his time in the core and his boot camp days.

 

Thx in advance for the help. :)

 

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Desertrat56
Posted (edited)

I can answer the dog tag question because it is the same for all branches of the service.  There are two dog tags so that if you are killed in action one is left with the body and one is sent home for the next of kin.

The first day of boot camp for the marines is probably the same as for the army, you arrive on a bus with a lot of others and when it stops drill sergeants are there to greet you with yelling and calling names, you have to run and grab your gear, then stand in line while they yell some more.  You get in lines to get uniforms, and boots and other equipment.  Then you are assigned a bunk and a locker.  What ever you brought with you is piled in up when you get off the bus and you get to dig through the piles to get your stuff to put in your locker with your new gear.  Sometimes people are crying and others are claiming they were drugged and never signed anything. 

Good luck with your story.

 

Edited by Desertrat56
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Leon G
On 6/25/2020 at 6:00 PM, Desertrat56 said:

I can answer the dog tag question because it is the same for all branches of the service.  There are two dog tags so that if you are killed in action one is left with the body and one is sent home for the next of kin.

The first day of boot camp for the marines is probably the same as for the army, you arrive on a bus with a lot of others and when it stops drill sergeants are there to greet you with yelling and calling names, you have to run and grab your gear, then stand in line while they yell some more.  You get in lines to get uniforms, and boots and other equipment.  Then you are assigned a bunk and a locker.  What ever you brought with you is piled in a stack and you get to dig through the stack to get your stuff to put in your locker with your new gear.  Sometimes people are crying and others are claiming they were drugged and never signed anything. 

 

First day in sounds a lot like our nations army first day in :D Maybe that is worldwide the same drill :D

 

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Leon G
3 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

I can answer the dog tag question because it is the same for all branches of the service.  There are two dog tags so that if you are killed in action one is left with the body and one is sent home for the next of kin.

So which info is on it? Name your enlistnumber or something? 

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Taun
13 minutes ago, Leon G said:

So which info is on it? Name your enlistnumber or something? 

(Looking at my old dog tags)

Name

Service Number

Blood Type

Religious Preference

 

I've been out of the Army for 15 years now, so it might have changed a bit - but not much if at all

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Leon G
4 minutes ago, Taun said:

(Looking at my old dog tags)

Name

Service Number

Blood Type

Religious Preference

 

I've been out of the Army for 15 years now, so it might have changed a bit - but not much if at all

Thx for the info ;)

Now I'm wondering what if you do not have a religion? 

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Desertrat56
Posted (edited)
25 minutes ago, Leon G said:

So which info is on it? Name your enlistnumber or something? 

Name, Id number, Rank I think.  I lost my dog tags after I got out so I can't look to be sure.  @Manwon Lender probably knows

Edited by Desertrat56
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Desertrat56
5 minutes ago, Leon G said:

Thx for the info ;)

Now I'm wondering what if you do not have a religion? 

Doesn't matter about religion in the U.S.  You can tell them or not or just say no religion.  I don't think that goes on the dog tags.  In basic you are allowed to go to religious services if you want.

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CrimsonKing

Just as a starter the USMC is a branch of the US Navy not the Army...the thread title is a bit confusing lol

Good luck with the book :tu:

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Desertrat56
54 minutes ago, Taun said:

(Looking at my old dog tags)

Name

Service Number

Blood Type

Religious Preference

 

I've been out of the Army for 15 years now, so it might have changed a bit - but not much if at all

Oh, yes, I forgot about blood type.  The second day of basic we had to sit at tables and poke our fingers for a drop of blood to put in the kit to see what our blood type was.

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Leon G
40 minutes ago, CrimsonKing said:

Just as a starter the USMC is a branch of the US Navy not the Army

Army is a general description. You probably know what I ment. If youre a marine or with the navy in our country that means you are a member of the military or army. 

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CrimsonKing
Just now, Leon G said:

Army is a general description. You probably know what I ment. If youre a marine or with the navy in our country that means you are a member of the military or army. 

Don't EVER call a Marine a Army soldier,just ask if they are in the "military" if you're not sure which branch they are from...

It'll save you an earful :lol:

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spartan max2
40 minutes ago, CrimsonKing said:

Don't EVER call a Marine a Army soldier,just ask if they are in the "military" if you're not sure which branch they are from...

It'll save you an earful :lol:

Also never call them a "ex-Marine". Marines say once a Marine always a Marine.

 

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rashore
29 minutes ago, Leon G said:

Army is a general description. You probably know what I ment. If youre a marine or with the navy in our country that means you are a member of the military or army. 

Army might be a general description where you are... but in the U.S. it is its own distinctive military branch. Folks can be pretty fierce about which branch is which. For the sake of your character being a Marine, don't generalize with the term 'army", generalize with the term "military".

Something to note may be where your character is from. There are two Marine training bases in the U.S., and which one a recruit ends up at depends on where they are recruited from. Officers go do a different place than the regular recruits. Depending on how old your character is, there will be some historical changes to things like how long training has been, and so on. 

It's Wikipedia, but this gives you a basic overview of what happens during and after basic training: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Marine_Corps_Recruit_Training

 

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Leon G
4 minutes ago, spartan max2 said:

Also never call them a "ex-Marine". Marines say once a Marine always a Marine.

 

Yep I know that. I just mean he aint in the marine anymore officialy. ;)

 

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Leon G
3 minutes ago, rashore said:

Army might be a general description where you are... but in the U.S. it is its own distinctive military branch. Folks can be pretty fierce about which branch is which. For the sake of your character being a Marine, don't generalize with the term 'army", generalize with the term "military".

Something to note may be where your character is from. There are two Marine training bases in the U.S., and which one a recruit ends up at depends on where they are recruited from. Officers go do a different place than the regular recruits. Depending on how old your character is, there will be some historical changes to things like how long training has been, and so on. 

It's Wikipedia, but this gives you a basic overview of what happens during and after basic training: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Marine_Corps_Recruit_Training

 

He enlists at the age of 17 with written aprovel from his father. The MC had actualy a double nationality in the story. Born and raised in Belgium for about 12 years than moved to his family in New York. Father is American working for an American company in the Antwerp harbour. Mother is Belgian.

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spartan max2
23 minutes ago, Leon G said:

Yep I know that. I just mean he aint in the marine anymore officialy. ;)

 

Just giving you information for your book.

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Leon G

You hear from marines. I did 3 tours etc.

What duration has 1 tour. And how many time is there between ending 1 tour and beginning another tour?

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Taun
1 hour ago, Leon G said:

You hear from marines. I did 3 tours etc.

What duration has 1 tour. And how many time is there between ending 1 tour and beginning another tour?

Not sure about the US Marines length of tour (6 months each I believe - but I could be wrong) in the US Army a combat tour is 12 months (sometimes a bit more for pre-deployment training). Generally speaking Army units are not re-deployed for a year following a Combat Zone deployment (but there are exceptions)... The Air Force tour of duty was (I believe) 3 months to 6 months, but less time between deployments.

I was deployed in 2004 to Iraq (Late 2003 actually, for train up) and returned in early 2005, and my unit was redeployed to Afghanistan in 2006 (Late) - it just depends on your unit type (I was in an Engineer unit) and how badly they need them. As we were construction Engineers (Schools, Hospitals, roads, railroads and bridges) as opposed to Combat Engineers (fortifications, air fields, assault bridging, etc) we got a lot of use...

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Taun
3 hours ago, Leon G said:

Thx for the info ;)

Now I'm wondering what if you do not have a religion? 

If not religious (or just prefer to not say) they put "No Religious Preference"...

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Leon G
3 minutes ago, Taun said:

Not sure about the US Marines length of tour (6 months each I believe - but I could be wrong) in the US Army a combat tour is 12 months (sometimes a bit more for pre-deployment training). Generally speaking Army units are not re-deployed for a year following a Combat Zone deployment (but there are exceptions)... The Air Force tour of duty was (I believe) 3 months to 6 months, but less time between deployments.

I was deployed in 2004 to Iraq (Late 2003 actually, for train up) and returned in early 2005, and my unit was redeployed to Afghanistan in 2006 (Late) - it just depends on your unit type (I was in an Engineer unit) and how badly they need them. As we were construction Engineers (Schools, Hospitals, roads, railroads and bridges) as opposed to Combat Engineers (fortifications, air fields, assault bridging, etc) we got a lot of use...

And after finishing your boot camp? They send you directly or is it waiting for a few months?

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Desertrat56
Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, Leon G said:

And after finishing your boot camp? They send you directly or is it waiting for a few months?

After boot camp is advanced training, then deployment or an assignment.  I am not sure about combat units.  And the marines may be different but I think it is the same, advanced training in what ever job you will be doing.

P.S.  I forgot to mention, the time the training takes depends on the job you are being trained for.  For example I was first trained as a radio operator and that was 5 weeks of training.  Later I was trained as a tactical circuit controller and that was 12 weeks of training.

Edited by Desertrat56
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Manwon Lender
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

Name, Id number, Rank I think.  I lost my dog tags after I got out so I can't look to be sure.  @Manwon Lender probably knows

For the Army, your Dog Tags have your Name, Social Security Number, Blood Type, and your Religious affiliation.

Peace, hope this helps

Edited by Manwon Lender
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Manwon Lender
2 hours ago, Taun said:

Not sure about the US Marines length of tour (6 months each I believe - but I could be wrong) in the US Army a combat tour is 12 months (sometimes a bit more for pre-deployment training). Generally speaking Army units are not re-deployed for a year following a Combat Zone deployment (but there are exceptions)... The Air Force tour of duty was (I believe) 3 months to 6 months, but less time between deployments.

I was deployed in 2004 to Iraq (Late 2003 actually, for train up) and returned in early 2005, and my unit was redeployed to Afghanistan in 2006 (Late) - it just depends on your unit type (I was in an Engineer unit) and how badly they need them. As we were construction Engineers (Schools, Hospitals, roads, railroads and bridges) as opposed to Combat Engineers (fortifications, air fields, assault bridging, etc) we got a lot of use...

In the Army, to receive credit for a Combat Tour of Duty, it does require you to have boots on the ground for a minimum of 6 months. This is was put into place to stop individuals form receiving credit for a Combat Tour, by just flying in and leaving the next day. A combat tour of duty for the Marines use to be 6 to 7 months, but that may have changed, I don't know. Thanks for your service, and while you didn't mention it being an Engineer in the Middle East could be a very dangerous job. I know that in many cases insurgents would target you guy's because the jobs you were doing made you easy targets. I had a couple of friends whose job was to do over watch when Engineers and others where working at fixed positions in cities, for that very reason.

What was your home duty station, and how long did you serve? 

Peace

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Taun
Posted (edited)
19 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

In the Army, to receive credit for a Combat Tour of Duty, it does require you to have boots on the ground for a minimum of 6 months. This is was put into place to stop individuals form receiving credit for a Combat Tour, by just flying in and leaving the next day. A combat tour of duty for the Marines use to be 6 to 7 months, but that may have changed, I don't know. Thanks for your service, and while you didn't mention it being an Engineer in the Middle East could be a very dangerous job. I know that in many cases insurgents would target you guy's because the jobs you were doing made you easy targets. I had a couple of friends whose job was to do over watch when Engineers and others where working at fixed positions in cities, for that very reason.

What was your home duty station, and how long did you serve? 

Peace

I was in for 34 years so I had a LOT of home duty stations, lol...  I was in the Active Army for just over 10 years and the Reserves for the remaining 24... While in the Active Army I was mostly in Communications - both tactical and strategic (Tactical is usually radios, teletype and other voice comms, while strategic is mostly data and Satellite comm)... In the Army the Signal Corps is probably the most technical of the branches (Others may disagree) and generally responsible for all forms of communications, computer systems and most electronics. I was also in Ordnance (meaning "weapons systems") and assigned to a Pershing Missile Unit as electronic maintenance. In my 10 years active I served full tours in Italy, Japan (just outside Tokyo), Germany, White Sands Missile Range New Mexico and Fort Hood Texas. In the Reserves I went on a few "Humanitarian missions" (Earthquake relief, etc) I was sent to Jordan, Kuwait, Iraq, Guatemala and East Timor - and that's all as a "Part time soldier" lol...

In the Reserves I was Infantry (mostly as a Drill Sgt) and back in Communications. I was in Commo when I was assigned to an Engineer Brigade and deployed to Iraq. And you are right Engineers (and other "Support" personnel came under some heavy fire while there.

I loved the Signal Corps because you could be assigned anywhere in the world - to any type of unit - you have to be really "flexible"..

 

And what desertrat56 says about time of training is true... The shortest MOS (or job) producing school I ever went to was 3 weeks and the longest was two 42 week courses, one in Russian language and the other in Pershing Missile systems.

Edited by Taun
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