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What is your top mystery?

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Piney
12 minutes ago, TrumanB said:

Sometimes we can't even pick. For example, my plan was to spend part of 2020 in Thailand. It didn't happen due to covid-19. It's just not given to me to meet some nice Thai girl. This may make you laugh but that's an example. Sometimes we are not even given an opportunity to choose. I have so many examples from my life.

Sometimes we don't. But then we can make things happen if we want. 

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TrumanB
1 minute ago, Piney said:

Sometimes we don't. But then we can make things happen if we want. 

That depends on one's personal karma. Some can make things happen, some can't.

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XenoFish
Just now, TrumanB said:

That depends on one's personal karma. Some can make things happen, some can't.

That sounds more like a limiting belief. 

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Piney
Just now, TrumanB said:

That depends on one's personal karma. Some can make things happen, some can't.

It depends on if you want to grab the rudder and oars or continue to drift. 

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TrumanB
Just now, XenoFish said:

That sounds more like a limiting belief. 

I had positive beliefs about some goals in my life but I wasn't able to achieve them. I had negative beliefs about some other goals and I achieved them. Why? Because of karma. It works whether you believe in it or don't.

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XenoFish
2 minutes ago, TrumanB said:

I had positive beliefs about some goals in my life but I wasn't able to achieve them. I had negative beliefs about some other goals and I achieved them. Why? Because of karma. It works whether you believe in it or don't.

You're probably like me. Your brain work a lot better with reverse psychology. I'm a very successful pessimist. Plus positive fantasies short circuit motivation and quite often we just can't do things. If I look at all the potential problems I might face I have in my mind a set of challenges and obstacles I have to over come. It's called defensive pessimism. I don't always succeed, but I try my best.

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XenoFish

That is kind of a mystery to me. People often look negatively at those who are pessimistic, yet I find myself being extremely comfortable with it. I see the potential issues of things, it doesn't stop me, I don't expect much, I just make the most of it all. To me being a pessimist is the most optimistic thing I can do.....kinda odd that is. Perhaps I'm just a realist with pessimistic leanings?

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Wepwawet

The identity of Smenkhare is my top mystery.

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LV-426
1 hour ago, ChrLzs said:

On the topic of big rocks...  Some folks here need to just google "how to shift huge stones without modern machinery".  You'll quickly find one guy who does up to about 20 tonnes ALONE, so imagine having lots more people....  It's not rocket science, you just use pivots and gravity and maybe some digging...  What was the saying - Give me a lever long enough...

 

I take it you mean this guy?

 

 

Sure... I  buy that as a reasonable, demonstratable method of moving large rocks.

I've seen his work before, along with others, for example erecting large obelisks using walls and sand.

Again, I'd lean towards methods like this, but saying "It's not rocket science" is misleading. If similar methods were indeed used to move much larger rocks over vast distances millenia ago, it pretty much was the rocket science of the day.

Putting together all the pieces; quarrying such large stones, moving them over such large distances, cutting and carving them with such precision... surely there's still an element of mystery in there? If nothing else, was there perhaps more communication and sharing of knowledge between ancient civilizations than conventional historians presume?

I mean... we are on the unexplained-mysteries forums, and not the explained-fact forums... there's surely just a little wiggle room for mystery where there is no definitive, conclusive evidence?

Sorry, maybe it's just me being an immovable rock :lol:

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Harte
17 hours ago, LV-426 said:

 

Well, from your own link, which to be fair is from a site dedicated to debunking just about everything:

"We do not claim to know how the heavy lifting and exquisite masonry was accomplished at Puma Punku, but that's a far cry from saying we believe the Tiwanaku were incapable of it. We simply don't have a record of which of the many possible tools and techniques they used."

I favour science and logical explanations, but "They dragged it there" seems a pretty flimsy explanation for such an incredible feat. I'd imagine if you asked a contemporary engineer to move a 131 tonne rock ten miles without any kind of modern equipment, they'd look at you like you were mad! :lol:

Again, I lean towards the rational, but if this was a feat accomplished by the Tiwanaku, I'd like to see convincing evidence of the techniques used, the manpower involved, along with estimates of how long it took, etc. Until then I'm not thinking "ALIENZ!!", but I am thinking "mystery" :D

The link debunks the "mystery of Puma Punku," yes.

There's no actual "mystery" about Puma Punku.

Regarding the manpower, you'll have to find someone that's done the calculations, or do them yourself.

I know the stones were dragged from the work of Jean Pierre Protzen. His observation of scratches on the stones from dragging them, as well as stones that were left behind, and the locations of the quarries, says all you need to know about transporting them. He also goes into the carving of them as well.

Here's one of his papers. Who Taught the Inca Stonemasons Their Skills? A Comparison of Tiahuanaco and Inca Cut-Stone Masonry

Harte

 

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jethrofloyd

Top mystery? How is it possible 'Unexplained Mysteries' exists more than 19 years without explaining world's greatest mysteries? :P

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Harte
6 hours ago, jethrofloyd said:

Top mystery? How is it possible 'Unexplained Mysteries' exists more than 19 years without explaining world's greatest mysteries? :P

Ahem.

The site name is "Unexplained Mysteries," not "Unexplained Mysteries Explained."

Harte

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Piney
On 8/6/2020 at 6:11 PM, Wepwawet said:

The identity of Smenkhare is my top mystery.

Smenk Hare (translated as "Vigorous is the Smell of the Bunny") was given rule over all Leporidae by his Daddy-un-law  Ank Hanky Ten. ^_^

 

........Don't hit me Harte. :unsure2:

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joc
On 8/6/2020 at 4:32 PM, XenoFish said:

You're probably like me. Your brain work a lot better with reverse psychology. I'm a very successful pessimist. Plus positive fantasies short circuit motivation and quite often we just can't do things. If I look at all the potential problems I might face I have in my mind a set of challenges and obstacles I have to over come. It's called defensive pessimism. I don't always succeed, but I try my best.

Some see the glass as half full, others see the glass as half empty.  While others don't even see the glass at all.  Pessimism is a result of habit of using negative words.  It is really impossible to be a pessismist if one has removed all of the negatives from their thought process.   It really has more to do with the quality of that mysterious thing people call 'happiness'.    Negative thoughts create stress in the mind and the body.  Positive thoughts reduce stress.  A reduction of stress creates a more harmonious mind set.

And ...a more harmonious mind set is something that money cannot buy.  A lot of people however will try to sell the 'harmonious mind set' idea.  

Quote

Plus positive fantasies short circuit motivation and quite often we just can't do things

Caution:  Road closed ahead.   I have no idea what a positive fantasy is...but I do know that the reason 'some of you people'  just can't do things is because you SAY you can't.  It is the Power of the Apostrophe T.  I like the phrase:   Can't is not a part of my volcabulary.  

That is the real mystery to me.  Why the vast majority of people are locked into the whole   can't   framework of thinking.    Everything is a chemical response in the brain.  The word can't creates a chemical response in my brain liken unto the smell of cat urine.   

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XenoFish
20 minutes ago, joc said:

Some see the glass as half full, others see the glass as half empty.  While others don't even see the glass at all.  Pessimism is a result of habit of using negative words.  It is really impossible to be a pessismist if one has removed all of the negatives from their thought process.   It really has more to do with the quality of that mysterious thing people call 'happiness'.    Negative thoughts create stress in the mind and the body.  Positive thoughts reduce stress.  A reduction of stress creates a more harmonious mind set.

And ...a more harmonious mind set is something that money cannot buy.  A lot of people however will try to sell the 'harmonious mind set' idea.  

Caution:  Road closed ahead.   I have no idea what a positive fantasy is...but I do know that the reason 'some of you people'  just can't do things is because you SAY you can't.  It is the Power of the Apostrophe T.  I like the phrase:   Can't is not a part of my volcabulary.  

That is the real mystery to me.  Why the vast majority of people are locked into the whole   can't   framework of thinking.    Everything is a chemical response in the brain.  The word can't creates a chemical response in my brain liken unto the smell of cat urine.   

Yeah, that hilarious. I get more done by acknowledging what can go wrong than by thinking "good thoughts". If I know of potential problems I can plan accordingly. Look up defensive pessimism sometime. I've already dealt with depression, depression isn't pessimism. It's a ****ty state of consciousness.

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Harte

It might be true that you will fail to achieve this or that goal. Sometimes unexpected events can get in the way, sometimes you're not up to it, sometimes plans change etc.

Sometimes people have unrealistic goals too.

One of my favorite movies is "Monty Python's The Meaning of Life."

Bunch of really silly Brits acting out laugh out loud sketches, but in the end it brings home the point that the only meaning to life is the meaning you attribute to it.

Here it is in a nutshell:

Harte

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lightly
On August 3, 2020 at 5:05 PM, ChrLzs said:

More importantly, who created the Creator?  You can't reason that the Universe needs a creator, as if that is given.  If it is, then you need to explain the creator of the Creator, and so on.   So, do you have anything better as evidence for a single, one time only, Creator?

         There is here&now.    I really wonder  if   somehow   The 'passage' of time . . and.  .the 'vastness' of space are illusions ! !

   I know how ridiculous that sounds... but, Seriously.   Is there really any other time than now...or any other place than here?

try this.... Go someplace else, and when you get there ,  tell me where you are and what time it is ! ?  Lemme guess,  Here?    Now?  

.         It would sort of simplify things wouldn't it?   :P

      

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ChrLzs

On related musings, I saw an article recently (I think it was posted here but I'm being lazy..) about astronomers now being able to use 3D mapping techniques to examine the 'view' from virtual locations both inside and far outside our galaxy.  Those views, no matter where the virtual observer, seem to show a similarly uniform universe stretching outwards infinitely, as far as can be mapped.  That suggests that the Universe has no centre and is properly endless, no matter where you look. 

But does that mean it won't eventually shrink and die, and then restart the cosmic cycle...?  Not necessarily...  and that point my head explodes.  :D

 

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