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Still Waters

Asymptomatic carriers have high viral loads

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Still Waters

People who are infected with the coronavirus carry similar levels of the pathogen in their nose, throat and lungs whether they have symptoms or not, a new study from South Korea showed on Thursday.

The paper, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, is an important biological line of evidence in support of the idea that asymptomatic carriers can spread Covid-19.

Until now, experts have relied on inferring asymptomatic spread when people contract the virus without contact with a known carrier.

https://www.nst.com.my/world/world/2020/08/614638/asymptomatic-covid-19-carriers-have-high-viral-loads

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seanjo

Covid Mary's

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spartan max2

More evidence against the idea that viral load is what effects serverity. 

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stereologist

Asymptomtic people are also prone to losing antibodies quickly. This would suggest that community immunity is unlikely. Then again reinfection individuals has not been established.

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Manwon Lender
10 hours ago, spartan max2 said:

More evidence against the idea that viral load is what effects serverity. 

Who said that, for more than two months Doctors have been saying they do not have a clear understanding why some people are Asymptomtic, some have minor effects, and others have severe effects and possibility die. To my knowledge this has nothing to do with Viral load, where did you get your information from??

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stereologist

Just posted about this study in another thread.

https://abcnews.go.com/Health/covid-19-antibodies-fade-months-study/story?id=71406787

Quote

Specifically, the study's authors found that people with COVID-19 who never develop symptoms may see their antibodies fade more quickly than those who tested positive for the virus and also came down with its tell-tale symptoms.

The study, though small and with limitations, provides greater insight into a topic that mystifies scientists examining this new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. Most people who have recovered from COVID-19 develop antibodies, but the extent and duration of that protection remains unknown.

The issue is that asymptomatic people do not help in the issue of community immunity as much as those that became ill.

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spartan max2
18 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

Who said that, for more than two months Doctors have been saying they do not have a clear understanding why some people are Asymptomtic, some have minor effects, and others have severe effects and possibility die. To my knowledge this has nothing to do with Viral load, where did you get your information from??

It was a theory floating around early during the pandemic since there would be 90 year olds getting off fine but doctors in their 30's dieing.

So the idea was maybe that medical staff are exposed to a higher viral load, due to their job, causing the difference in severity.

But this study goes against that theory.

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stereologist
8 minutes ago, spartan max2 said:

It was a theory floating around early during the pandemic since there would be 90 year olds getting off fine but doctors in their 30's dieing.

So the idea was maybe that medical staff are exposed to a higher viral load, due to their job, causing the difference in severity.

But this study goes against that theory.

That's a hypothesis, an idea that can be tested.

Not trying to be critical, just being careful because so many posters are posting codswallop I figured it would be beneficial for someone such as yourself that is posting high quality information.

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Manwon Lender
15 minutes ago, spartan max2 said:

It was a theory floating around early during the pandemic since there would be 90 year olds getting off fine but doctors in their 30's dieing.

So the idea was maybe that medical staff are exposed to a higher viral load, due to their job, causing the difference in severity.

But this study goes against that theory.

I must have missed that, while I have followed this Pandemic pretty close, there is so much information it's very easy to miss things. 

Thanks for your response.

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Dustyrose33

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/forty-percent-of-people-with-coronavirus-infections-have-no-symptoms-might-they-be-the-key-to-ending-the-pandemic/ar-BB17JpdS?ocid=msedgdhp

This article looks into why a fairly high percentage are asymptomatic.   Could it be with illnesses people have had in the past their bodies have built a resistance to Covid 19?   Maybe their cells recognize Covid from previous coronaviruses in the past.

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spartan max2
27 minutes ago, Dustyrose33 said:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/forty-percent-of-people-with-coronavirus-infections-have-no-symptoms-might-they-be-the-key-to-ending-the-pandemic/ar-BB17JpdS?ocid=msedgdhp

This article looks into why a fairly high percentage are asymptomatic.   Could it be with illnesses people have had in the past their bodies have built a resistance to Covid 19?   Maybe their cells recognize Covid from previous coronaviruses in the past.

 

The thread I posted was saying that the common cold might lead to cells identifying Covid quicker.

 

 

 

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