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Eldorado

'Get back to work!", PM tells Civil Servants

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RAyMO
Just now, stevewinn said:

I don't pay for the private sector.

But you are willing to pay for public sector  to continue with what is now a proven uneconomic model - costing the tax payers more than should be the case. 

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Grey Area
9 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

 

the joke is when did the public sector actually start working. :D even before covid.

Well you would know it if they actually did stop.  Then you really would have something to moan about.

 

10 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

Its now time for public sector workers to suck it up and get back to their 'place of work' imagine going to work and not even having to take your slippers off.

Why?  Why does it bother you that someone might be in slippers while they work?  Seriously you come across as just bitter.  When you get a call from one of those vital private firms providing a much needed accident claim service, would it make a difference if the caller was wearing pink pyjamas?

 

14 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

On deaths, do you think govt measures have prevented deaths. over half of the deaths are from care homes, after patients where cleared out the hospitals back to care homes taking the virus with them. i'd say those measures have killed more than they saved.

Private homes are a whole new discussion.  What is not discussed is the fact that despite government guidelines they had the power to manage their own responses to Covid.  Many simply failed and, not every case, the NHS, has a role to play, but the majority use the government as a scapegoat.

And no I think those people who have acted responsibly to government guidelines have saved lives.

19 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

When the Honk Kong flu hit there was no cure there was going to be deaths. the same with Covid, sociopath or realist.

Aaah well no matter then, they had it coming.

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stevewinn
4 minutes ago, RAyMO said:

But you are willing to pay for public sector  to continue with what is now a proven uneconomic model - costing the tax payers more than should be the case. 

I'd question any jobs value that can be done from home. and i'd question the uneconomical claim, no doubt they count 101 factors from outside the working environment to reach that conclusion. such as if you don't have to travel to work you run less risk of getting a puncture in your bike tyre. and so less chance of being late, so on and so forth. .

3 minutes ago, Grey Area said:

Well you would know it if they actually did stop.  Then you really would have something to moan about.

 

Why?  Why does it bother you that someone might be in slippers while they work?  Seriously you come across as just bitter.  When you get a call from one of those vital private firms providing a much needed accident claim service, would it make a difference if the caller was wearing pink pyjamas?

 

Private homes are a whole new discussion.  What is not discussed is the fact that despite government guidelines they had the power to manage their own responses to Covid.  Many simply failed and, not every case, the NHS, has a role to play, but the majority use the government as a scapegoat.

And no I think those people who have acted responsibly to government guidelines have saved lives.

Aaah well no matter then, they had it coming.

There are public sector workers and then there's public sector workers. embarrassing to see the latter in recent times trying to pass themselves off as critical workers.

Not bitter about anything but to have Unions threaten strike action because the slippers have to come off. C'mon it doesn't look good, and like i said above, in reply to another poster, any role which can be done from home is questionable in itself. 

ah the govt guidelines saving lives, yeah right, lets just say this the second wave were now in the midst of as they call, Its only called a second wave because it wasn't dealt with in the first wave. or as the reality is its just one wave protracted. a modern day King Canute turning back the tide.

 

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Grey Area
9 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

I'd question any jobs value that can be done from home. and i'd question the uneconomical claim, no doubt they count 101 factors from outside the working environment to reach that conclusion. such as if you don't have to travel to work you run less risk of getting a puncture in your bike tyre. and so less chance of being late, so on and so forth. .

I’m not sure you completely understand what value certain jobs may have.  But here’s one for you.  If you Get on the 7:30 from Birmingham to London Euston, half the train is  sitting with laptops and phones out working away.  If these people can comfortably work during their commute to the office, why do they need the office.  As we have seen, the location of the office in relation to the services around it is inextricably linked to this.  You seem to stuck in a pre internet mindset, connectivity has almost made the traditional office redundant.

Would I prefer to have a central office to work from?  To be honest, we have been working remotely for a long time, with most of my time spent visiting service users.  With hindsight the office is a huge expenditure that is not needed.  For instance our Annual office rent Is almost 35% of our total budget.  Money that could be used for our vulnerable children.

Of course some jobs, predominately industry cannot be done from home, but there’s no plausible reason the bureaucracy needs to be centralised.

44 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

There are public sector workers and then there's public sector workers. embarrassing to see the latter in recent times trying to pass themselves off as critical workers.

Well I think you need to be more specific.  Just like the private sector, the public sector has many different aspects.

All sorts passed themselves off as key workers, that’s true, I admit the governments stance on this was too open, and the schools didn’t do enough to police this.

48 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

Not bitter about anything but to have Unions threaten strike action because the slippers have to come off. C'mon it doesn't look good, and like i said above, in reply to another poster, any role which can be done from home is questionable in itself. 

Well the slippers analogy is yours, I personally have never really considered the footwear of workers I cannot see the feet of before, but there are websites that cater for people who have a thing about feet.

I am sure the Unions have concerns other than their members having to change shoes, by all means present it here and we’ll talk about the issues.  As a public sector worker myself I really dislike the Unions, my inbox got spammed by them with anti brexit rhetoric, very distasteful.

56 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

ah the govt guidelines saving lives, yeah right, lets just say this the second wave were now in the midst of as they call, Its only called a second wave because it wasn't dealt with in the first wave. or as the reality is its just one wave protracted. a modern day King Canute turning back the tide.

That’s not really what I said though is it?  What saved lives is people acting responsibly in respect to the guidelines.  What has caused this situation to be prolonged are those who didn’t act responsibly and went out protesting and having party’s.

The whole idea behind the governments response was to slow the spread.  I believe it worked in that respect.  No one liked it, it wasn’t there to be approved of.  It would have been interesting to have seen a Corbyn response to it if it had happened a year earlier.

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stevewinn
5 minutes ago, Grey Area said:

I’m not sure you completely understand what value certain jobs may have.  But here’s one for you.  If you Get on the 7:30 from Birmingham to London Euston, half the train is  sitting with laptops and phones out working away.  If these people can comfortably work during their commute to the office, why do they need the office.  As we have seen, the location of the office in relation to the services around it is inextricably linked to this.  You seem to stuck in a pre internet mindset, connectivity has almost made the traditional office redundant.

Would I prefer to have a central office to work from?  To be honest, we have been working remotely for a long time, with most of my time spent visiting service users.  With hindsight the office is a huge expenditure that is not needed.  For instance our Annual office rent Is almost 35% of our total budget.  Money that could be used for our vulnerable children.

Of course some jobs, predominately industry cannot be done from home, but there’s no plausible reason the bureaucracy needs to be centralised.

Well I think you need to be more specific.  Just like the private sector, the public sector has many different aspects.

All sorts passed themselves off as key workers, that’s true, I admit the governments stance on this was too open, and the schools didn’t do enough to police this.

Well the slippers analogy is yours, I personally have never really considered the footwear of workers I cannot see the feet of before, but there are websites that cater for people who have a thing about feet.

I am sure the Unions have concerns other than their members having to change shoes, by all means present it here and we’ll talk about the issues.  As a public sector worker myself I really dislike the Unions, my inbox got spammed by them with anti brexit rhetoric, very distasteful.

That’s not really what I said though is it?  What saved lives is people acting responsibly in respect to the guidelines.  What has caused this situation to be prolonged are those who didn’t act responsibly and went out protesting and having party’s.

The whole idea behind the governments response was to slow the spread.  I believe it worked in that respect.  No one liked it, it wasn’t there to be approved of.  It would have been interesting to have seen a Corbyn response to it if it had happened a year earlier.

If public sector workers are being asked to return to their work place they should be returning. not unions threatening strike action.

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Setton
1 hour ago, stevewinn said:

If public sector workers are being asked to return to their work place they should be returning. not unions threatening strike action.

Why should they be returning? If they're perfectly capable of working from home, why isn't the government looking to make efficiencies by closing the offices. 

You could keep some more of your precious taxes.

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Grey Area
3 hours ago, stevewinn said:

If public sector workers are being asked to return to their work place they should be returning. not unions threatening strike action.

Aaaah yes I see now to what you are referring.  Civil servants had been encouraged to return to work, but let’s get that into context.

This request was very London-centric and was about money, about the poor little bank side cafes and boutiques that no one was frequenting on their lunch breaks.

 

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L.A.T.1961
On 10/11/2020 at 2:10 AM, Jujo-jo said:

I seen a democratic interview a cpl weeks ago and Democrats want to make it mandatory for every U.S. citizen who is employed to be under Union law, pay and protection. (There will be even less protection for the employer.) Abd they hope to have this in place between 2023 to 2030.

Don't forget you'll have to pay your fair share of dues. And laws and rule are subject to change after the change occurs if the dems can get it to pass. 

It doesn't sound good for either one, the employee or the employer, just another way to have full rule over you so they can get their cut, I'm sure it won't be good for Unions either, theyll will have to follow other government laws and rules that will effect employees...

I don't see how making union membership mandatory would work? There are many employees who would not want a union operating at their work place or be forced to pay union dues. 

It should be up to the individual to decide on union involvement and a system set up to allow flexible membership as and when required. 

 

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Jujo-jo
6 hours ago, L.A.T.1961 said:

I don't see how making union membership mandatory would work? There are many employees who would not want a union operating at their work place or be forced to pay union dues. 

It should be up to the individual to decide on union involvement and a system set up to allow flexible membership as and when required. 

 

100% agreed!

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