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Eldorado

Man blocked from livestreaming his death

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Eldorado

"Facebook says it will block a Frenchman suffering from an incurable condition from livestreaming his own death.

"Alain Cocq, 57, planned to broadcast his final days after starting to refuse food, drink and medicine on Saturday.

"President Emmanuel Macron had earlier denied his request for euthanasia.

"Mr Cocq wants the law changed in France to allow terminally ill people to die as they wish. Some groups, including the Catholic Church, oppose euthanasia on moral grounds."

Full monty at the BBC: Link

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susieice

I agree he should be able to die with dignity but I don't think Facebook should be livestreaming it. To me, that's not dignity.

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acute

I read about the plan to stream his death, but I don't know what I think about it being blocked.

Anyway..... I suspect it's just publicity for his pro-euthanasia stance.

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Rlyeh

What ever happened to public hangings?

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diddyman68

Killjoys 

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seanjo
3 hours ago, susieice said:

I agree he should be able to die with dignity but I don't think Facebook should be livestreaming it. To me, that's not dignity.

It's his choice, his death bed wish, it should be allowed.

 

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spartan max2
3 hours ago, susieice said:

I agree he should be able to die with dignity but I don't think Facebook should be livestreaming it. To me, that's not dignity.

I agree generally, to not encourage public suicides. 

But I do like that in this situation it was to bring awareness to the stupidity of society not granting him a peaceful death with euthenasia.

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susieice

He's making his point. It's morbid and sad to watch someone die. To me, that's not dignity.

Edited by susieice
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Gwynbleidd
8 hours ago, susieice said:

He's making his point. It's morbid and sad to watch someone die. To me, that's not dignity.

Oh I agree Susie.  If it makes him any happier, he could just hook up a webcam and record his last few days instead.  That way, family members or whoever is desperate enough to want to watch this fellow take his last breath, hear his last words, will be able to.  He just won't be LIVE streaming........on facebook anyway.

Yes, it is rather morbid, videoing one's self dying.  However, each to their own I suppose.  On that note, maybe he should try Twitch.  Plenty of other LIVE streaming platforms out there.

Alas, Facebook has spoken and they act like they're the LAW now anyway.  :P 

Edited by Gwynbleidd
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ant0n

https://www.huffingtonpost.fr/entry/alain-cocq-facebook-de-lempecher-de-filmer-sa-mort-en-direct_fr_5f536e58c5b62b3add411882

Facebook and its security rules (translated from French):

" "While we respect his decision to draw attention to this complex issue, based on expert advice, we have taken steps to prevent live streaming on Alain's account, as our rules do not allow not the depiction of suicide attempts, ”a Facebook spokesperson told AFP.

End of life, assisted suicide or self-harm: on Facebook, the content related to these situations is subject to a series of rules aimed at reconciling user safety and freedom of expression, as the case of Alain Cocq illustrates. .

These rules have been tightened up over the years after high profile cases, such as the 2017 death in the UK of Molly Russell, a 14-year-old who committed suicide after viewing content related to the self-harm and suicide on Instagram, a subsidiary of Facebook.

While the platform never communicates about the individual situations that its moderation teams are called upon to handle, it has a very detailed set of rules on what its users can and cannot post, which help understand how the social network reacts in this kind of case.

These “community standards” aim to reconcile several requirements, including user safety and freedom of expression. While they do not include specific end-of-life provisions, they are on the other hand very strict with regard to content that may appear to promote suicide or self-harm. Cases that include euthanasia or assisted suicide.

“In an effort to promote a safe environment on Facebook, we remove all content that encourages suicide or self-harm, including certain explicit images, real-time representations and fictitious content which experts believe may incite other people to adopt a similar behavior ”, warns the network in its “standards”(https://www.facebook.com/communitystandards/).

However, these same rules allow “photos or videos of someone who has committed suicide in the news”, as well as “photos or videos of someone who has suffered euthanasia or assisted suicide in a medical context”, but by limiting their access to those over 18 years of age and accompanying them with a warning message.

The network nevertheless reserves the right to relax its own rules, if it comes to consider that normally unauthorized content is of public interest.

“In some cases, we allow the publication of content that goes against our 'community standards' if it is relevant and of public interest,” explains the network, which ensures, in such situations, assess “The positive impact for the public interest versus the potential harm”, while relying “on the universal principles of human rights”.

Finally, the network sometimes leaves contentious content online long enough to provide assistance to those who publish it, if this can save lives. “We have been told by experts that we should not delete live self-harm videos while relatives of the victim and authorities can still intervene, Facebook says, by way of example."

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razman

Violating his freedom of speech. Maybe it makes his death more comfortable knowing everyone is watching.

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Still Waters

Update: Frenchman Alain Cocq accepts palliative care after bid to livestream death

Quote

A terminally ill Frenchman who was blocked from livestreaming his own death on Facebook has now accepted palliative care and backed down on a vow to starve.

Alain Cocq, 57, started to refuse food, drink and medicine on Saturday.

But he told AFP news agency on Wednesday that he did not have the "capacity for the fight any more".

After eating again, Mr Cocq told AFP on Wednesday he would be allowed to return home in the next 10 days, where a medical team would be installed.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-54094247

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