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Still Waters

Where your hometown was millions of years ago

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Still Waters

A California paleontologist has created an interactive map that allows people to see how far their hometowns have moved over 750 million years of continental drift.

The online map, designed by Ian Webster, features a range of tools that also make it easy to discover more about the Earth, such as where the first reptiles lived or when the first flower bloomed.

"It shows that our environment is dynamic and can change," Webster, 30, told CNN. "The history of Earth is longer than we can conceive, and the current arrangement of plate tectonics and continents is an accident of time. It will be very different in the future, and Earth may outlast us all."

https://edition.cnn.com/2020/08/30/us/map-hometown-earth-continental-drift-scn-trnd/index.html

Here's the interactive map:

https://dinosaurpictures.org/ancient-earth#120

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Myles

Pretty neat.

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XenoFish

Looks like my location has pretty much always been near mountains.

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Myles
7 minutes ago, XenoFish said:

Looks like my location has pretty much always been near mountains.

Seems like it may be pretty accurate.  It shows that in the Cretaceous period that some of Missouri was under water.   When I grew up there, we used to find marine fossils quite often.   I was always told that it was ocean at one time.  

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Carnoferox
4 hours ago, Myles said:

Seems like it may be pretty accurate.  It shows that in the Cretaceous period that some of Missouri was under water.   When I grew up there, we used to find marine fossils quite often.   I was always told that it was ocean at one time.  

Missouri was underwater for most of the Late Cretaceous, but we also know that it above sea level at some points. There is a single site where LK dinosaur fossils have been found near Glen Allen, MO.

https://www.bcmnh.org/exhibits/dinosaurs/

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