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Damien99

Friction and brakes

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Damien99

So I have a question about friction. 
on a motorcycle the front brake is 3/4 if stopping power and back break 1/4 of stopping. Now a few times in an emergency stop I have fishtailed my back tire. I learned this is because the front break was not enabled enough for the back break to stop steady. Friction question if both breaks are engaged why would it matter how much you engage the front brake. 
 

 

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toast
32 minutes ago, Damien99 said:

So I have a question about friction. 
on a motorcycle the front brake is 3/4 if stopping power and back break 1/4 of stopping. Now a few times in an emergency stop I have fishtailed my back tire. I learned this is because the front break was not enabled enough for the back break to stop steady. Friction question if both breaks are engaged why would it matter how much you engage the front brake.

I dont know what exactly is your question but I will give it a try. Brake power depends on various circumstances like speed, bike type, tyres, chassis/suspension setup and dynamic wheel load distribution during the braking process. I mentioned bike type because there are big differences between a Harley (which isnt a motorbike but a alienated agricultural machine) and a modern SuperSport bike. Depending on the speed, up to nearly 100% of the breaking power are delivered by the front brakes. While breaking, the load (bike and driver) move to the front, resulting into relief of the rear wheel and so to reach the blocking point early. As a blocked wheel has no stabilizing centrifugal force anymore, trouble will occur. In a nutshell, the front brakes are running the show.

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Damien99
52 minutes ago, toast said:

I dont know what exactly is your question but I will give it a try. Brake power depends on various circumstances like speed, bike type, tyres, chassis/suspension setup and dynamic wheel load distribution during the braking process. I mentioned bike type because there are big differences between a Harley (which isnt a motorbike but a alienated agricultural machine) and a modern SuperSport bike. Depending on the speed, up to nearly 100% of the breaking power are delivered by the front brakes. While breaking, the load (bike and driver) move to the front, resulting into relief of the rear wheel and so to reach the blocking point early. As a blocked wheel has no stabilizing centrifugal force anymore, trouble will occur. In a nutshell, the front brakes are running the show.

It is a 1300cc tour bike, weighs 685 pounds plus my 240 49 pound body 

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toast
7 minutes ago, Damien99 said:

It is a 1300cc tour bike, weighs 685 pounds

Horror!

Edited by toast

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Damien99
1 hour ago, toast said:

Horror!

It’s not that bad but big difference from my last 400 pounder lol

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seanjo

C of G, When braking with the front brake the weight of the machine is transferred onto the front tyre, the rear wheel brake becomes less effective the more you pull on the front brake because the rear tyre is lifting off the surface of the road, to the point you'll do a stoppy...as I have, accidentally...basically weight and C of G...

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