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Still Waters

First ever preserved adult extinct cave bear

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Still Waters

Until now only the bones of cave bears have been discovered. 

The new finds are of ‘world importance’, according to one of Russia’s leading experts on extinct Ice Age species. 

Scientist Lena Grigorieva said of the island discovery of the adult beast: 'Today this is the first and only find of its kind - a whole bear carcass with soft tissues. 

'It is completely preserved, with all internal organs in place including even its nose. 

The remains were found by reindeer herders on the island and the remains will be analysed by scientists at the North-Eastern Federal University (NEFU) in Yakutsk, which is at the forefront of research into extinct woolly mammoths and rhinos. 

https://siberiantimes.com/other/others/news/first-ever-preserved-grown-up-cave-bear-even-its-nose-is-intact-unearthed-on-the-arctic-island/

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justin3651

Really neat! Makes one wonder what else is waiting to be found out there. One of my biggest finds I'd like to see someone make is a denisovan or Neanderthal (or an unknown human species) in this state or better(with accompanying tool kit preferably). 

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Carnoferox

Note that there is not yet confirmation that this is a cave bear (Ursus spelaeus). It was found pretty far outside the known range of cave bears and is more likely a brown bear (U. arctos) or a number of other extinct species known from Siberia (U. ingressus, U. rossicus, U. kudarensis, etc.). The title of this thread should probably be changed to something like "First preserved bear found in permafrost".

Edited by Carnoferox
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MysteryMike

An impressive find never the less, but chances are its an Eurasian brown bear as its far from the cave bears native range. Sorry to be a killjoy.

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