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rashore

Generational UL's

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rashore

Please, no debunking, ridicule of lore, or other skeptical or beliefs gainsaying in this thread. I'm looking for a bit of research here, not debates about real or not. And a bit of fun perhaps.

I'm looking for folks that have participated in generational UL's. The stories over the campfire, your older sibling telling you, or you being older sibling carrying on the tradition. Grandma always put out a saucer of milk and a jigger of spirits... Rabbit rabbit on the first of the month.. 

I've been the younger a few times. The older siblings that would tell horror stories about whomever down the road, the older kids with cars that did? or swear they know someone that did hell rides. Tales of ghost or weird out where ever at school. 
The older kids that I was too that with a wink and a nudge told the same over other campfires, along other roads. The guy that got up in a gorilla suit just to prove how much folks don't really look around and see a guy in a gorilla suit. 

Lets have some fun UL

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Desertrat56
Posted (edited)

Do you mean multi-generational?  I grew up with the older kids and even one of my friend's mother telling me about La Llorona, which is a popular myth used to keep children away from the ditches and rivers all through the south west and Mexico.  It may eve have come from Spain, but I don't have any information about that.  The story is a woman hit a hard time and could not take care of her children (that part may differ in different areas) so she took her children down to the river and drowned them, then wailing and sorrowful she drowned her self.  Her ghost walks the river and ditch banks wailing and looking for her children and when she finds any children her ghost takes them into the water and drowns them.

The other one was one that no one really put much effort into, though I think my parents grew up with more serious stories about the boogie man.  I am guessing that came from England, but not sure.  Apparently the boogie man hides under your bed and gets you if you don't go right to sleep.  :lol:  Maybe there is someone who knows better where that one came from.

Edited by Desertrat56
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XenoFish

My grandfather used to talk about little people who lived in the mountains. He's a paranoid schizophrenic in a nursing home so I don't think it counts as a MGUL.

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jmccr8
24 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

Do you mean multi-generational?  I grew up with the older kids and even one of my friend's mother telling me about La Llorona, which is a popular myth used to keep children away from the ditches and rivers all through the south west and Mexico.  It may eve have come from Spain, but I don't have any information about that.  The story is a woman hit a hard time and could not take care of her children (that part may differ in different areas) so she took her children down to the river and drowned them, then wailing and sorrowful she drowned her self.  Her ghost walks the river and ditch banks wailing and looking for her children and when she finds any children her ghost takes them into the water and drowns them.

The other one was one that no one really put much effort into, though I think my parents grew up with more serious stories about the boogie man.  I am guessing that came from England, but not sure.  Apparently the boogie man hides under your bed and gets you if you don't go right to sleep.  :lol:  Maybe there is someone who knows better where that one came from.

Hi Desertrat

Not sure if I remember correctly but wasn't she from Mexico and her lover did not want her children so she drowned them then later killed herself when he rejected her?

jmccr8

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Desertrat56
10 minutes ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Desertrat

Not sure if I remember correctly but wasn't she from Mexico and her lover did not want her children so she drowned them then later killed herself when he rejected her?

jmccr8

Like I said each area has a different reason that she drowned her kids.  Where I grew up it was because she didn't want them to starve.  The spaniards were in may neighborhood before they got to Mexico, but Mexico City did grow up faster than Albuquerque, though they did leave a priest here on the first pass through who built a church which is here oldest in the country. 

 

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HandsomeGorilla
Posted (edited)

Bloody Mary, anyone? lol family wasn't religious but sent me to Christian daycare, we would dare one another to do it alone in the bathroom

Say it three times, she appears in the mirror

Edited by HandsomeGorilla
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HandsomeGorilla
Posted (edited)

Oh!!! @XenoFish can relate!!! ****IN LIZARD MAN!!! We're pretty positive it's just someone out having fun with it. Something I would do

Edited by HandsomeGorilla

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XenoFish
5 minutes ago, HandsomeGorilla said:

Oh!!! @XenoFish can relate!!! ****IN LIZARD MAN!!! We're pretty positive it's just someone out having fun with it. Something I would do

Crybaby bridge also. Remember a few of my friends went back in the early 90's, I didn't, I had to work. They didn't hear anything. Haven't seen anything new about the lizard man in forever. 

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HandsomeGorilla
3 minutes ago, XenoFish said:

Crybaby bridge also. Remember a few of my friends went back in the early 90's, I didn't, I had to work. They didn't hear anything. Haven't seen anything new about the lizard man in forever. 

I've heard some spooky tales about Parris Island, though. Not saying I believe every word, but they're intriguing 

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zep73

What does "UL" mean? My guess is "Urban Lore"?

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XenoFish
20 minutes ago, zep73 said:

What does "UL" mean? My guess is "Urban Lore"?

Urban legends.

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zep73
2 minutes ago, XenoFish said:

Urban legends.

Of course. Silly me.

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jmccr8

I looked for some from where I grew up and there were none.

jmccr8

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Piney
2 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

Do you mean multi-generational?  I grew up with the older kids and even one of my friend's mother telling me about La Llorona, which is a popular myth used to keep children away from the ditches and rivers all through the south west and Mexico.  It may eve have come from Spain, but I don't have any information about that.  The story is a woman hit a hard time and could not take care of her children (that part may differ in different areas) so she took her children down to the river and drowned them, then wailing and sorrowful she drowned her self.  Her ghost walks the river and ditch banks wailing and looking for her children and when she finds any children her ghost takes them into the water and drowns them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cihuacōātl  :yes:

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DebDandelion
5 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

Do you mean multi-generational?  I grew up with the older kids and even one of my friend's mother telling me about La Llorona, which is a popular myth used to keep children away from the ditches and rivers all through the south west and Mexico.  It may eve have come from Spain, but I don't have any information about that.  The story is a woman hit a hard time and could not take care of her children (that part may differ in different areas) so she took her children down to the river and drowned them, then wailing and sorrowful she drowned her self.  Her ghost walks the river and ditch banks wailing and looking for her children and when she finds any children her ghost takes them into the water and drowns them.

The other one was one that no one really put much effort into, though I think my parents grew up with more serious stories about the boogie man.  I am guessing that came from England, but not sure.  Apparently the boogie man hides under your bed and gets you if you don't go right to sleep.  :lol:  Maybe there is someone who knows better where that one came from.

Here by us we have the Tokoloshi, pardon the spelling, different for each culture we have here. I do believe he has the same properties as the boogie man you spoke about. 

Then we have evil spirits that manifest as baboons and sit on your roof and create chaos. 

Ah, the stories we grew up with. 

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DebDandelion
4 hours ago, HandsomeGorilla said:

Bloody Mary, anyone? lol family wasn't religious but sent me to Christian daycare, we would dare one another to do it alone in the bathroom

Say it three times, she appears in the mirror

Heard about that. We (also Christian) didn't have her this side. I wonder if the stories are bound my culture and continent, because we share a denomination (faith) but not the story. 

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DebDandelion

One that I grew up with, was the train that transported the Kruger Rands. Story goes that the spirits of the soldiers that transported the money (and the train it was transported on) can be seen when the right conditions present itself. You can hear the chatter of the soldiers, you can see the train, feel the rails vibrate as the train comes, but once the train reaches the forest it disappears. So the myth goes that you have to be on the ghost train and travel with it to find the missing treasure. 

So the train appears, you race to catch it, get on it and go with it into the forest. 

Always wondered how the heck I am suppose to get on a ghost train, but hey... 

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joc
7 hours ago, DebDandelion said:

Then we have evil spirits that manifest as baboons and sit on your roof and create chaos. 

Oh my gosh!  I actually heard the baboons creating chaos on my roof.  I ran out the door expecting to see the baboons but ...alas... 'twas only Guineas.

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Mr Walker

My father who was born about 1927 told us many stories about local legends,  The y involved everything  from  ghosts to Yowies .Some were based on earlier stories and local knowledge but many were his own experiences  He would take us out to the places involved and show us them

I passed them onto another two generations of family and my school students They now appear occasionally in local media and online sites  and because i taught so many students locally  they have become true urban legends in the local area, even if the y were not before. I dont have time now but i will try and relate a few later if ones from south australia are of interest 

just one quick one 

The local cemetery is divided up into catholic and other sections (and now a returned services section)  The first graves went back to the mid 1800s and at the time (mid 1960s) both cemeteries were still in use When i was about 16 there was an urban legend which became a test of courage for those of us just getting our drivers licences and able to get out a t night 

In the center of The catholic  cemetery a ghost was supposed to appear 

The test was  to   go  (walk) up to the ghost alone while the others watched from  their cars 

A night was arranged for my "initiation and we all went out to the cemetery on the edge of town 

At first nothing could be seen then, in the middle of the large cemetery a glowing light appeared a t one of the grave sites 

I suspected it was someone with a torch so i happily waked in, despite the tall tales which were told about  this ghost 

any way as i approached, the light got brighter, until it was quite luminescent 

Clearly there was no one there, and it was not a torch light 

I think i probably was getting a bit worried, but i went closer 

Eventually I found the light source to be a large glowing tombstone

 

I went back to the rest of the teenagers and explained what i had found 

I had passed the test(which many people did not )  by going into the grave yard and up to the light, and it was explained to me that there was something about tha t tombstone which was phosphorescent.  When the moon came out, the tombstone lit up 

The older kids all knew this, if the y had passed the initiation but  never told anyone 

The practice seems  t o have died out and so  might ot be really intergenerational but I dont know just how long it had been going on, or how long it continued after I left home for uni  

 

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Mr Walker

Another  story from my father. 

In the early 1900s  his aunt and uncle owned a big old two story colonial (pre 1901) house, just out of Port lincoln.

 In the 1920s he and his young cousins would play in and around the house, but the y were forbidden from  going up the stairs They were told that there was  a ghost there, (a classic white lady ghost)  who hated young boys, and would appear if they went upstairs 

As the y grew a little older they found out tha t, actually, there was an elderly great aunt who occupied rooms in the  top of the house She was not well, and didn't  like noise, so the parents made up  the story of the ghost,  which effectively kept the noisy young boys out of the top floor 

Eventually the old lady died, and by now, the boys, including my father, were in their teens 

One day, not long after her death, they went up the stairs, only   to encounter a real white lady ghost on the landing.

   She glared a t them, then smiled and waved her finger, as if to say "got you," then disappeared 

Checked against family photos she was the spitting image of the deceased great  aunt in her night gown and cap.

That was the only confirmed sighting of her, but i have heard many other stories that she continued to appear sporadically for years 

Here a re a few pictures of the house. it has been modernised and renovated, so much of the "old" character of a dark late victorian house has been lost, but you can still get an idea of it.

  

 The photos are too large to upload so i've included a website where you can get a good look.

 https://www.plrealestate.com/listings/residential_sale-1779168-port-lincoln/

Edited by Mr Walker
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Mr Walker

there was one famous haunted house between port lincoln and tumby bay For about 20 years we lived across the valley from  its location , although it was burned out in a bushfire before that time

(I have my own stories to tell about the ghost from there) 

My father (again)  used to tell me a story about a carrier who delivered a load of gravel late one evening, only to have it disappear,

 In dads story the bloke didn't stay around to investigate in the twilight  but  went back to the pub and spent some time with his mates. In the morning the y went out to the house (which already had a terrifying reputation) and found out what had happened to the load.

Later i discovered this was based on a true event   (it may have been embellished or the carrier might not have told the reporter the full story) 

posted below    From the Port Lincoln Times 1951

Weewanda, an old house some
half-way from Tumby Bay and Port
Lincoln, has often been spoken of
as the haunted house. Perhaps the
biggest justification for the term
was experienced by a local carrier.
The house is to be renovated and
the carrier was commissioned to de-
liver a truck load of sand. This he
tipped on a clear space near the
house. Going round the truck to
inspect the sand after tipping, he
was startled to find his load had dim-
inished and looked like a couple of
barrow loads. He naturally thought
of the ghosts and lifted his hat in-
voluntarily as he realised that its
capacity seemed quite unpredictable.
However, as the sand did not con-
tinue to shrink, he plucked up cour-
age and investigated. He found that
he had tipped the load of sand on an
old underground tank, and into this
most of his load had disappeared
 
The folowing article is about the same house and gives some background as to why it was thought to be haunted 
It doesn't quite fit other stories i have heard and the actual house was up hill from  the main road, not downhill, but I'm pretty sure it's the same place  given its location, description and surrounding features. There was an old dirt road, now reclaimed by farm land, which went above the house and could have been the vantage spot for this story 
quote

Port Lincoln Times (SA: 1927 - 1954) Thursday 11 February 1943

A Tragedy of 70 Years Ago

Residents of Port Lincoln and surrounding district have often heard of "the haunted house." This property may be seen by anyone going from Port Lincoln to Tumby Bay. The following article has been handed to us by an old servant, who worked at the house over 40 years ago: —

"There's a nice homestead," I remarked, pointing down to a large gabled house with a wide verandah, which nestled grey and snug amid gums clustering at the foothills. About it stretched acres of untended paddocks, and in the distance were sandhills and the chuckling sea.

"Come down and see it," answered our friend and guide, leading the way. As we approached...

"Why, it's a ruin deserted!" someone exclaimed. So it was. A dead house. Passing through the leering door we found large lofty rooms, with shattered windows, broken and rotted floors, gaping cupboards and shelves displaying broken china and rusted tinware, and over everything the un- disturbed dust for years and the smell of decay. Trusting little swallows fluttered in and out of the mud nests which plastered the walls. Almost every room bore silent witness of the trespassing of tramps.

From our friend we heard the history of this house.

"More than 30 years ago," she said, "the son of a wealthy squatter married and brought his bride to this house, which they called _____. It was a lovely home and they were so happy until one day their one child became very ill. Immediately the distracted parents moved to Port Lincoln where, however, the little one's death occurred. It died with diphtheria. Broken hearted the two poor souls returned to _____. Stayed only to pack their bags before they left, leaving everything just as it was— carpets, pictures, curtains, oil filled lamps, sugar filled basins everything. They never came back. Later other members of the family removed most of the furniture, but since the death no one has lived there."

We stood silently awhile in that lonely house, visualising it as it had stood in its youthful pride and beauty. The vague eerie sounds peculiar to long deserted homes jerked us back to the present; the mouldy rags that had once been gay curtains fluttered drearily at the broken windows. They seemed to be waving to us a forlorn farewell. Very quietly we departed leaving the grey house once more to its memories, the little wild things, tramps, and the curious passer-by. Left it standing as it has stood those 30 years, sadly alone, awaiting patiently, no doubt, for the return of the happy voices and the tiny pattering feet.

https://www.facebook.com/HistoryOfPortLincoln/posts/i-would-love-to-see-people-post-things-about-haunted-houses-and-ghost-stories-he/814357611983223/

 end quote
There is more to the story than this, however. 
The couple had about 8 children, all of whom succumbed to diphtheria over two winters, despite  being taken to a seaside location to improve their health   Some are buried in the Koppio cemetery and some in the Pooninidie cemetery.
  The mother became increasingly depressed and distressed, and eventually hung herself inside the house. I suspect this was left out of the newspaper  article for reasons of sensibility and sensitivity to  a suicide  
it was at this point that the father walked away, leaving the house abandoned.
It remained abandoned for a long time and while many people over the years tried  to  renovate it and live in it, all were driven away by the ghost  Apparently she was a noisy ghost, always weeping and wailing, and calling out.  For over 100 years the house had a reputation The ghost of the woman was seen many times, often calling out, 'Where are you/they " and "Close the door."
  Eventually it was abandoned and used for storage of hay. Then in1970 or so it was burned out in a large bushfire, and a new transportable house was built on the site, but still nestled in the old gum trees on the side of the hill  
We bought a property directly across the valley from  the old ghost house and, one day, her ghost came to live with us, but that's another story :)
Edited by Mr Walker

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HollyDolly

Interesting story.Only one i know is one my mother mentioned. She grew up in Springville Ny, near Buffalo. Anyways, we were there to visit some friends of hers. Well  she told us  kids there was a haunted house. It belonged to a couple. Well the husband  got mad at his wife, and chopped her head off.  That's the only detail  i remember. She didn't say the reason why.  So that's my urban legend. My dad went to school with a girl back in Hot Springs,Arkansas in the 1920s and 30s.  Now her mother was native american and she was a healer, worked with herbs, native plants. A lot of the hill folk around there considered her a conjure woman, and  were in awe and kind of afraid of her.  Meaning they though she might   be a witch. She  was well educated and used to laugh at the idea she was a witch. Understand she was a very nice woman.

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TashaMarie
On 10/8/2020 at 12:37 AM, HandsomeGorilla said:

Bloody Mary, anyone? lol family wasn't religious but sent me to Christian daycare, we would dare one another to do it alone in the bathroom

Say it three times, she appears in the mirror

That one was popular at my school, can't remember why possibly related to a film or program out at the time.

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TashaMarie

Is the one with the baby sitter and the telephone call a UL or a movie?  I know I've heard it many times but not sure.

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Desertrat56
8 minutes ago, TashaMarie said:

Is the one with the baby sitter and the telephone call a UL or a movie?  I know I've heard it many times but not sure.

It actually did happen,I think in the early 70's,  then was made in to a movie.

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