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Atlantis Explained!


Rojack

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2 hours ago, Rojack said:

 

The palace was washed away. However, the springs are still there. I know its not going to prove my point. I just want to know if you will consider the fountains as evidence.

The whole palace? Foundations, quarry marks, roads, trash pits, ect

And no, the springs are natural. I've been there. Even collected some fossils from them. It's noteworthy that some of these sites have provided evidence of Pre Clovis culture but nothing whatsoever to do with Atlantis. 

 As others have said its really difficult to prove a negative, but these springs are stable, deep places which have proven to be a goldmine for artifact preservation. 

 It's noteworthy that these places provide evenidence of habitation but complete abscense of something like Atlantis. 

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3 hours ago, Rojack said:

Plato said that three moats surrounded the royal palace and there were two springs in the are. If I show you the two springs would you consider that as evidence?

Too late. I have it already.

image.png.1930badc91f50c37f85eea3ce461dd38.png

Harte

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3 hours ago, Rojack said:

Plato said that three moats surrounded the royal palace and there were two springs in the are. If I show you the two springs would you consider that as evidence?

Plato placed Atlantis just outside the Pillars of Hercules/Straits of Gibraltar. Why are you moving it 3000+ miles across the ocean which IS NOT where Plato placed it? 

cormac

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17 minutes ago, cormac mac airt said:

Plato placed Atlantis just outside the Pillars of Hercules/Straits of Gibraltar. Why are you moving it 3000+ miles across the ocean which IS NOT where Plato placed it? 

cormac

Because Plato didn’t know how to write his own stories. And Rojack must be smarter than Plato, since Rojack knew what Plato /meant/ to say. 

—Jaylemurph 

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9 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

Because Plato didn’t know how to write his own stories. And Rojack must be smarter than Plato, since Rojack knew what Plato /meant/ to say. 

—Jaylemurph 

Pretending that one is in any way qualified to psychoanalyze someone dead for more than 2000 years is pretty much the definition of stupidity IMO. 
 

cormac

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2 hours ago, ShadowSot said:

The whole palace? Foundations, quarry marks, roads, trash pits, ect

And no, the springs are natural. I've been there. Even collected some fossils from them. It's noteworthy that some of these sites have provided evidence of Pre Clovis culture but nothing whatsoever to do with Atlantis. 

 As others have said its really difficult to prove a negative, but these springs are stable, deep places which have proven to be a goldmine for artifact preservation. 

 It's noteworthy that these places provide evenidence of habitation but complete abscense of something like Atlantis. 

I'm a bit busy on other things but it might be useful to see if there have been any sedimentation studies?

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1 hour ago, cormac mac airt said:

Plato placed Atlantis just outside the Pillars of Hercules/Straits of Gibraltar. Why are you moving it 3000+ miles across the ocean which IS NOT where Plato placed it? 

cormac

Can you show me that quote from Plato's story?

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1 hour ago, cormac mac airt said:

Pretending that one is in any way qualified to psychoanalyze someone dead for more than 2000 years is pretty much the definition of stupidity IMO. 
 

cormac

Ah, yes, nearly a cottage industry - people 'correcting' Plato so they can locate Atlantis to this or that place.

 

As Rupert has noted, and he just 'metaphysically' kicked me in the shins, Atlantis was inflatable and floated around for thousand of years - they never could find the anchors despite all their high tech...

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7 minutes ago, Rojack said:

Can you show me that quote from Plato's story?

Why haven't you read Timaeus yet? Seriously

Quote

This power came forth out of the Atlantic Ocean, for in those days the Atlantic was navigable; and there was an island situated in front of the straits which are by you called the Pillars of Heracles; the island was larger than Libya and Asia put together, and was the way to other islands, and from these you might pass to the whole of the opposite continent which surrounded the true ocean; for this sea which is within the Straits of Heracles is only a harbour, having a narrow entrance, but that other is a real sea, and the surrounding land may be most truly called a boundless continent.

http://classics.mit.edu/Plato/timaeus.html

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37 minutes ago, Rojack said:

Can you show me that quote from Plato's story?

That tells me you’ve never read Critias or Timaeus. READ THEM FIRST, then stop pretending you know what he said.
 

cormac

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1 hour ago, cormac mac airt said:

That tells me you’ve never read Critias or Timaeus. READ THEM FIRST, then stop pretending you know what he said.
 

cormac

As I've noted before when I used to survey classes prior to starting The finding was that people who believe in CPA had not actually read the C & T by a large margin, most believed in the NAA and later on a few 'believed' in the SGA.

Edited by Hanslune
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3 hours ago, Hanslune said:

Why haven't you read Timaeus yet? Seriously

http://classics.mit.edu/Plato/timaeus.html

 

3 hours ago, Hanslune said:

Why haven't you read Timaeus yet? Seriously

http://classics.mit.edu/Plato/timaeus.html

Hi, Hanslune. Thanks for the quote. I have read Critias many times. Here is how I changed Plato’s quote. See the bold font:

Plato: [This power came forth out of the Atlantic Ocean, for in those days the Atlantic was navigable; and there was a boundless continent situated in front of the straits which are by you called the Pillars of Heracles; the continent of Atlantis was larger than Libya and Asia put together, and was the way to other islands, and from these you might pass to the whole of the opposite continent (South America) which surrounded the true ocean; for this sea which is within the Straits of Heracles is only a harbour, having a narrow entrance, but that other is a real Gulf , and the surrounding land may be most truly called a boundless continent.]

Those changes put me in Central America. The following quote took me to the Florida Plain.

Plato: “Looking towards the sea, but in the centre of the whole island, there was a plain which is said to have been the fairest of all plains and very fertile.” I would be looking across from the Gulf of Mexico to see the plain.

Note: I am not trying to correct you or Plato, so don’t take it personal. The last thing I want to do is get in a fight with you.

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18 minutes ago, Rojack said:

 

Hi, Hanslune. Thanks for the quote. I have read Critias many times. Here is how I changed Plato’s quote. See the bold font:

Plato: [This power came forth out of the Atlantic Ocean, for in those days the Atlantic was navigable; and there was a boundless continent situated in front of the straits which are by you called the Pillars of Heracles; the continent of Atlantis was larger than Libya and Asia put together, and was the way to other islands, and from these you might pass to the whole of the opposite continent (South America) which surrounded the true ocean; for this sea which is within the Straits of Heracles is only a harbour, having a narrow entrance, but that other is a real Gulf , and the surrounding land may be most truly called a boundless continent.]

Those changes put me in Central America. The following quote took me to the Florida Plain.

Plato: “Looking towards the sea, but in the centre of the whole island, there was a plain which is said to have been the fairest of all plains and very fertile.” I would be looking across from the Gulf of Mexico to see the plain.

Note: I am not trying to correct you or Plato, so don’t take it personal. The last thing I want to do is get in a fight with you.

Except you’re being intellectually dishonest by changing what Plato said and yes, YOU ARE trying to correct Plato based on what you want to be true and not on what he said. There is no verifiable evidence in support of your speculation and your credibility is exactly ZERO. 
 

cormac

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6 hours ago, Rojack said:

 

Hi, Hanslune. Thanks for the quote. I have read Critias many times. Here is how I changed Plato’s quote. See the bold font:

Plato: [This power came forth out of the Atlantic Ocean, for in those days the Atlantic was navigable; and there was a boundless continent situated in front of the straits which are by you called the Pillars of Heracles; the continent of Atlantis was larger than Libya and Asia put together, and was the way to other islands, and from these you might pass to the whole of the opposite continent (South America) which surrounded the true ocean; for this sea which is within the Straits of Heracles is only a harbour, having a narrow entrance, but that other is a real Gulf , and the surrounding land may be most truly called a boundless continent.]

Those changes put me in Central America. The following quote took me to the Florida Plain.

Plato: “Looking towards the sea, but in the centre of the whole island, there was a plain which is said to have been the fairest of all plains and very fertile.” I would be looking across from the Gulf of Mexico to see the plain.

Note: I am not trying to correct you or Plato, so don’t take it personal. The last thing I want to do is get in a fight with you.

It was shown on page 6 that you don't understand Greek. I explained it then to you. I posted the translations of several of the words you changed and showed that, intellectually speaking, your opinion carries no weight.

There were people then that spoke and read ancient Attic Greek, as there are those that can today. There is no substituting "continent" for "island," or you'll end up calling Andros a continent.

The fact that you don't understand this basic reality of language further demonstrates that you don't have the capacity to present anything of any value to this board concerning Atlantis - or likely concerning anything at all.

If you persist in ignoring the facts that people freely hand to you, you will be ignored.

Harte

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Maybe Rojack, Cladking and Atalante can form a club for enthusiasts of not speaking the languages they “speak.”

—Jaylemurph 

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32 minutes ago, jethrofloyd said:

I'm found Atlantis, and am going for a beer soon!! :tsu:

 

Are you saying Atlantis has somehow managed to avoid tier restrictions and lockdowns?

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39 minutes ago, jethrofloyd said:

I'm found Atlantis, and am going for a beer soon!! :tsu:

th?id=OIP.DeaomulStBBn89q2nCk48wHaHa%26p

I found Atlantis as well, but I can't remember where I put it ? 

I'll have to check my sock draws. 

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11 hours ago, Rojack said:

 

Hi, Hanslune. Thanks for the quote. I have read Critias many times. Here is how I changed Plato’s quote. See the bold font:

Plato: [This power came forth out of the Atlantic Ocean, for in those days the Atlantic was navigable; and there was a boundless continent situated in front of the straits which are by you called the Pillars of Heracles; the continent of Atlantis was larger than Libya and Asia put together, and was the way to other islands, and from these you might pass to the whole of the opposite continent (South America) which surrounded the true ocean; for this sea which is within the Straits of Heracles is only a harbour, having a narrow entrance, but that other is a real Gulf , and the surrounding land may be most truly called a boundless continent.]

Those changes put me in Central America. The following quote took me to the Florida Plain.

Plato: “Looking towards the sea, but in the centre of the whole island, there was a plain which is said to have been the fairest of all plains and very fertile.” I would be looking across from the Gulf of Mexico to see the plain.

Note: I am not trying to correct you or Plato, so don’t take it personal. The last thing I want to do is get in a fight with you.

"In front of the Pillars of Hercules"

That means the Straits of   Gibralter. South American is NOT  "in front" of the Straits of Gibraltar. It is four thousand miles away, and was a continent unknown to Plato. And what, precisely, is meant by ".. in those days the Atlantic was navigable.." ? When has it NOT been navigable, except in his parable when Atlantis sank and became a huge impassible shoal ? 

His whole story does not add up. Because it is not supposed to. It was a political parable, and nothing more. 

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9 hours ago, jethrofloyd said:

Isn't it time for a new Atlantis thread? This one already seems to be beaten to death.

I agree with you.

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20 hours ago, Rojack said:

 

 

18 hours ago, Essan said:

And the elephant in the room is ....... elephants :P    Never been any elephants in Florida.   Without elephants you can have no Atlantis.

Elephants: Mammoths and mastodons roamed North America during the time of Atlantis. Those extinct giants were Plato’s elephants.

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13 hours ago, cormac mac airt said:

Except you’re being intellectually dishonest by changing what Plato said and yes, YOU ARE trying to correct Plato based on what you want to be true and not on what he said. There is no verifiable evidence in support of your speculation and your credibility is exactly ZERO. 
 

cormac

That's why you have to go to the original Greek and see if the words used have any record of being used/having that meaning. Atalante would probably know.

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13 hours ago, Rojack said:

 

Hi, Hanslune. Thanks for the quote. I have read Critias many times. Here is how I changed Plato’s quote. See the bold font:

Plato: [This power came forth out of the Atlantic Ocean, for in those days the Atlantic was navigable; and there was a boundless continent situated in front of the straits which are by you called the Pillars of Heracles; the continent of Atlantis was larger than Libya and Asia put together, and was the way to other islands, and from these you might pass to the whole of the opposite continent (South America) which surrounded the true ocean; for this sea which is within the Straits of Heracles is only a harbour, having a narrow entrance, but that other is a real Gulf , and the surrounding land may be most truly called a boundless continent.]

Those changes put me in Central America. The following quote took me to the Florida Plain.

Plato: “Looking towards the sea, but in the centre of the whole island, there was a plain which is said to have been the fairest of all plains and very fertile.” I would be looking across from the Gulf of Mexico to see the plain.

Note: I am not trying to correct you or Plato, so don’t take it personal. The last thing I want to do is get in a fight with you.

Its nice that you read Critias but the relevant section is in Timaeus and it is Critias who is saying it.

This power came forth out of the Atlantic Ocean, for in those days the Atlantic was navigable; and there was an island situated in front of the straits which are by you called the Pillars of Heracles; the island was larger than Libya and Asia put together, and was the way to other islands, and from these you might pass to the whole of the opposite continent which surrounded the true ocean; for this sea which is within the Straits of Heracles is only a harbour, having a narrow entrance, but that other is a real sea, and the surrounding land may be most truly called a boundless continent. Now in this island of Atlantis there was a great and wonderful empire which had rule over the whole island and several others, and over parts of the continent, and, furthermore, the men of Atlantis had subjected the parts of Libya within the columns of Heracles as far as Egypt, and of Europe as far as Tyrrhenia.

As others have noted you are changing the meaning of a language you cannot speak. This is not only illogical but irrational to think you can 'bend' a written document to whatever you want. I use this Greek Dictionary when writing

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/definitionlookup?type=begin&q=&target=greek

I'm done. Have fun

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