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Still Waters

‘The Flying Train’ 1902 footage now colorised

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Still Waters

Vintage short ‘The Flying Train’ (1902) has been upscaled using Artificial Intelligence. This slice of life, shot aboard iconic vehicle the “Wuppertaler Schwebebahn”, is now a smoother ride than ever. What’s more, the comings and goings are presented in living color.

Starting with 68 mm footage from the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), tech wrangler Denis Shiryaev applied what are known as neural networks to ‘The Flying Train’.

Put simply, these networks mimic animal brains in order to work with and flesh out source material… in this case nearly 4 mins of celluloid. Jerkiness is substantially reduced by the addition of extra frames, which feel like part of the original film.

https://www.thevintagenews.com/2020/10/22/the-flying-train/

 

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toast

Wow, thats nice and watching the vid is like time travelling somehow.

There is another nice vid, a 1902-2015 side by side vid and its good to see how much of the old building are still there (11000 houses there were destroyed by bombings in 1943).

Something extraordinary bizarre: the Wuppertal Schwebebahn is the only monorail in the world an elephant jumped out off and into a river:

Quote

Tuffi (born in 1946 in India, died in 1989 in Paris) was a female circus elephant that became famous in West Germany during 1950 when she accidentally fell from the Wuppertal Schwebebahn into the River Wupper underneath.

wiki

 

Edited by toast
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zep73
13 minutes ago, toast said:

Wow, thats nice and watching the vid is like time travelling somehow.

Yes, it's mesmerizing and fascinating. Maybe the closest thing to time traveling we will ever get.

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jethrofloyd
1 hour ago, Still Waters said:

Put simply, these networks mimic animal brains in order to work with and flesh out source material… i

I wonder whether this technique can be applied to 'Patterson - Gimlin' footage too? ^_^

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Carnoferox

I think it would be cool to see this technology applied to old silent films to drastically increase the picture quality.

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