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vampgirl

Young Blood Gets New Meaning with Fresh Study

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vampgirl

LONDON (Reuters) - Maybe Dracula had a point. The term Young Blood -- meaning an injection of youthful vigor -- could have a medical origin.

Scientists at Stanford University found that wiring up an old mouse to the blood stream of a young one gave a major boost to muscle recovery time in the older one.

By contrast, when old blood was pumped round the body of a young mouse, muscle recovery time became more prolonged, they said in the science journal Nature.

It was not just muscles that benefited. The same was true of the livers of older mice.

Researchers said the results suggested that the aging process lay less with the organs themselves than with the tired blood off which they fed.

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Jesus_Freak

it makes sense... since older blood cells could no longer hold as much oxygen as freshly made cells

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Bizeebutt

you beat me too it JF wink2.gif as with all things in the body, functions of cells decrease in efficiency as the telomeres at the end of each strand of DNA fray just a tiny bit after each replication. Frayed telomeres means aging cells, and aging cells just don't work as well... they loose the ability to perform functions as well as they used to, or even at all.

We need a way to reverse the effects of the unravelling of the telomeres, and then you will have found the fountain of youth!!

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