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Was the Betz mystery sphere an alien device?


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"reacting to guitar playing by emitting a throbbing noise and changing direction when being rolled across the floor."

That's exactly what my wife does when I play guitar!

Maybe I should tune up...

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You can't xray metal, the below sentence makes me think the military part of the story is made up.  No one would have tried to x-ray a metal ball, maybe they would try sonar.

According to one analysis, there were "radio waves coming from it and a magnetic field around it", however initial attempts to x-ray it proved futile due to the metal being too thick to penetrate.


 

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Quote

It was later discovered that the stainless steel sphere happened to be a perfect match for a component kept in stock by a Jacksonville equipment supply company.

A component of what? Also, what is an 'equipment supply company'? What kind of equipment? Seriously, what sort of whatever needs a giant single ball bearing? 

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58 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

You can't xray metal, the below sentence makes me think the military part of the story is made up.  No one would have tried to x-ray a metal ball, maybe they would try sonar.

X-Ray is one of the non-destructive methods we use to detect casting defects in titanium and steel castings.  It requires some powerful sources, our biggest units were sunken below ground level in concrete vaults to protect the operators.  Smaller ones were located on the shop floor in concrete vaults.  

The ability to detect a defect becomes attenuated though.  In a wall thickness below a quarter inch or so, defects down to about .060" can be detected.  As walls get thicker, defect size for successful detection increases,  After about an inch, it is impractical to use.  That all supposes that the defect is of different density than the parent material for X-Ray penetration.  It can be less dense or more dense, either works.

Another method is ultrasonic detection.  That is used a lot in pipeline inspection.

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2 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

 

You can't xray metal, the below sentence makes me think the military part of the story is made up.  No one would have tried to x-ray a metal ball, maybe they would try sonar.

According to one analysis, there were "radio waves coming from it and a magnetic field around it", however initial attempts to x-ray it proved futile due to the metal being too thick to penetrate.


 

Hi Desertrat

Customs uses xray to scan semi trailers and sea cans  so it may be as the article says that the metal was too thick.

https://www.freightwaves.com/news/us-customs-and-border-protection-new-scanning-equipment-is-a-game-changer#:~:text=U.S. Customs and Border Protection is replacing and expanding its,the country's ports of entry.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is replacing and expanding its fleet of non-intrusive X-ray scanning machines used to look inside truck trailers and containers entering the country’s ports of entry.

The machines allow CBP officers to view the contents inside these freight transport conveyances for narcotics, weapons and other hidden contraband without having to open them. If suspicious cargo is discovered, the trailer or container can be pulled aside for physical inspection.

jmccr8

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:sleepy:

https://skeptoid.com/episodes/4334

 

Heavy metal Loc-nar?

Or

Phantasm sphere?

We find lots of weird junk metal detecting that we dont have a clue what it is, why make a jump from "i dont know what it is" to alien or paranormal? One cannot reach a definitive conclusion from "unknown".

This was a wild case of take a mundain object make up some wilder stories about it and watch the mullet jump,  there are all kinds of cool weird objects in the industrial world, a ball is down right dull,

leaving.gif.b57024a27058dbd02429058301f5ecab.gif

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3 hours ago, Seti42 said:

 

A component of what? Also, what is an 'equipment supply company'? What kind of equipment? Seriously, what sort of whatever needs a giant single ball bearing? 

 

 

aren’t ball bearings used in engines and the turrets of the big naval guns to allow them to transverse?

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The sphere�s specifications fit very closely with the balls in industrial ball check valves, such as those decommissioned at a Northside paper mill 15 years before the Betz sphere was found.....But it could have fell out of a UFO..right?

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3 hours ago, jethrofloyd said:

It was just a sphere that fell out while people photographing cover of Dream Theathre’s album Octavium. :D

00699954-wl.jpg

Damn good album tho

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"all concluded that the object was most likely man-made."

So, a littĺe indecision. Not sure. Back to square one. It would have been nice to find out how much it weighs. Also. If it was a bearing, it would be very heavy. Oh well, time to do some digging.

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4 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

X-Ray is one of the non-destructive methods we use to detect casting defects in titanium and steel castings.  It requires some powerful sources, our biggest units were sunken below ground level in concrete vaults to protect the operators.  Smaller ones were located on the shop floor in concrete vaults.  

The ability to detect a defect becomes attenuated though.  In a wall thickness below a quarter inch or so, defects down to about .060" can be detected.  As walls get thicker, defect size for successful detection increases,  After about an inch, it is impractical to use.  That all supposes that the defect is of different density than the parent material for X-Ray penetration.  It can be less dense or more dense, either works.

Another method is ultrasonic detection.  That is used a lot in pipeline inspection.

Would a ball bearing magnetize itself over its life? The ball had a magnetic field according to the link.

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35 minutes ago, Hankenhunter said:

Would a ball bearing magnetize itself over its life? The ball had a magnetic field according to the link.

I'm no expert.  I do know that many stainless and high chrome hard steels are non-magnetic as is titanium.  I could only guess ball bearings have a lot of chrome for a hard, smooth surface.

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50 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

I'm no expert.  I do know that many stainless and high chrome hard steels are non-magnetic as is titanium.  I could only guess ball bearings have a lot of chrome for a hard, smooth surface.

I was just curious because I've dumped bearings in a plastic bucket, and never saw any magnetic activity. I didnt know (still don't) if it's possible to pick up a charge over it's life span. I would think that the oil or grease would prevent static build-up? Unlike you, I am obviously no expert. You still have tons more metal exp. than me. I'm a wood guy. I can identify most types of wood by smell. Oh, and chain saws, axes, and peavys. And Trapping. Never had a chance a metallurgy, other than making my own knives.

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53 minutes ago, Hankenhunter said:

I was just curious because I've dumped bearings in a plastic bucket, and never saw any magnetic activity. I didnt know (still don't) if it's possible to pick up a charge over it's life span. I would think that the oil or grease would prevent static build-up? Unlike you, I am obviously no expert. You still have tons more metal exp. than me. I'm a wood guy. I can identify most types of wood by smell. Oh, and chain saws, axes, and peavys. And Trapping. Never had a chance a metallurgy, other than making my own knives.

Most ball bearings are magnetic but there are options where magnetic bearings are not acceptable. Chrome steel and most stainless steel bearings are magnetic. ... The slightly magnetic steel bearings are made from the much softer 316 stainless steel which is an austenitic steel. 

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35 minutes ago, To do list said:

Thanks, to do. But looking back at my post, I flubbed my question. I know bearings are magnetic. What I was blindly groping for is, do/can bearings become magnetized in their life? Does oil/grease stop the metal from becoming magnetized? Will magnetization occurs if all lubricant gone? Think seizing bearings. But then, does the heat remove the magnetization, because I do know that heat has a big effect on magnets. Extreme heat will weaken magnets drastically. I think a good experiment would be to acquire one of those cheap kids magnets where the  needle is resting freely on a pin top. See if it works. If it works, take one of those pocket torches, and heat the snot  out of it without actually melting it. Then see if it still works. You'd have to apply a tiny bit of lube to the pin after to make it easier to get the needle to swing if it wants to.

Edited by Hankenhunter
VERY BAD SPELLING *slaps fingers*
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2 hours ago, To do list said:

Most ball bearings are magnetic but there are options where magnetic bearings are not acceptable. Chrome steel and most stainless steel bearings are magnetic. ... The slightly magnetic steel bearings are made from the much softer 316 stainless steel which is an austenitic steel. 

That is great, thanks so much.  I read your link.  I was living with false information I never tested on ball bearings.  Live and learn.

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1 hour ago, Tatetopa said:

That is great, thanks so much.  I read your link.  I was living with false information I never tested on ball bearings.  Live and learn.

You just quoted the true meaning of life. Live, and learn. That's it. Congratulations Tateopa!

Can you see the other important phrase that ties into those last two words? Very important, and not from a metallurgy point of view either.

Edited by Hankenhunter
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https://images.app.goo.gl/MCMPBak9vWS643fA8


I recently discovered Antique and Vintage jewellery made from magnetites
Magnetite is a rock mineral and one of the main iron ores, with the chemical formula Fe₃O₄. It is one of the oxides of iron, and is ferrimagnetic; it is attracted to a magnet and can be magnetized to become a permanent magnet itself. It is the most magnetic of all the naturally-occurring minerals on Earth. Wikipedia

Edited by qxcontinuum
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22 hours ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Desertrat

Customs uses xray to scan semi trailers and sea cans  so it may be as the article says that the metal was too thick.

https://www.freightwaves.com/news/us-customs-and-border-protection-new-scanning-equipment-is-a-game-changer#:~:text=U.S. Customs and Border Protection is replacing and expanding its,the country's ports of entry.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is replacing and expanding its fleet of non-intrusive X-ray scanning machines used to look inside truck trailers and containers entering the country’s ports of entry.

The machines allow CBP officers to view the contents inside these freight transport conveyances for narcotics, weapons and other hidden contraband without having to open them. If suspicious cargo is discovered, the trailer or container can be pulled aside for physical inspection.

jmccr8

Thanks @jmccr8 & @Tatetopa  I just remember having to re-do xrays when I forgot to take bobby pins out of my hair, or remove a necklace.  It just leaves a bit white spot on the xray.   I did not know that there are applications for xraying metal.

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