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Still Waters

Are you a digital hoarder?

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Still Waters

How many emails are in your inbox? If the answer is thousands, or if you often struggle to find a file on your computer among its cluttered hard drive, then you might be classed as a digital hoarder.

In the physical world, hoarding disorder has been recognised as a distinct psychiatric condition among people who accumulate excessive amounts of objects to the point that it prevents them living a normal life. Now, research has begun to recognise that hoarding can be a problem in the digital world, too.

https://theconversation.com/digital-hoarders-weve-identified-four-types-which-are-you-153111

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Desertrat56
33 minutes ago, Still Waters said:

How many emails are in your inbox? If the answer is thousands, or if you often struggle to find a file on your computer among its cluttered hard drive, then you might be classed as a digital hoarder.

In the physical world, hoarding disorder has been recognised as a distinct psychiatric condition among people who accumulate excessive amounts of objects to the point that it prevents them living a normal life. Now, research has begun to recognise that hoarding can be a problem in the digital world, too.

https://theconversation.com/digital-hoarders-weve-identified-four-types-which-are-you-153111

It could just be a sign of  lack of understanding how comnputers work and/or laziness as well.

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Dreamer screamer
41 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

It could just be a sign of  lack of understanding how comnputers work and/or laziness as well.

downt b zilly, wi r ul innteregenmt nail

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TigerBright19

Same goes for digital photographers.  I used to take just 20-30 photos with the old disposable camera in the 1990's, but when everything became digital I ended up taking hundreds of photos of everything because for some reason I wanted to keep the memory of everything I saw and did fresh by taking photos almost daily like a diary.  It got to the point that I was spoiling happy moments because I became too fixated on getting the best camera angle at the exact right time, and taking dozens of photos of the same thing just to preserve the memory of whatever I was looking at e.g. sunset, full moon, or even just a film on tv, or the food I was about to eat.  It was much worse on holiday as I would spend much of the time just taking photos of the same scenery from different angles, distances, day, sunset, night, and when the traffic was busy or calm, just to get that perfect shot, and instead of picking the best photos and deleting the rest, I ended up keeping them all because I couldn't decide which one was the best, and because I felt like each photo was a memory of the holiday because I spent most of the time just taking photos lol.  I then stopped taking the camera so that I could take in the proper atmosphere of each holiday, but I then found myself keeping receipts and food wrappers each day so I could preserve the memory of everything I did.  Other people just write a diary, but my version of a diary was through photographs, wrappers and receipts.  I got so obsessive to the point that my garage was stacked high with newspapers as I wanted to keep the memory of every major historical event that I lived through.  Thankfully one day I came to my senses and threw the whole lot in the trash.  It's funny how the desire to hold onto the memory of 'everything' can make people go to strange lengths to achieve it.  I guess that's why some people don't throw away old clothes.

 

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Desertrat56
12 hours ago, TigerBright19 said:

Same goes for digital photographers.  I used to take just 20-30 photos with the old disposable camera in the 1990's, but when everything became digital I ended up taking hundreds of photos of everything because for some reason I wanted to keep the memory of everything I saw and did fresh by taking photos almost daily like a diary.  It got to the point that I was spoiling happy moments because I became too fixated on getting the best camera angle at the exact right time, and taking dozens of photos of the same thing just to preserve the memory of whatever I was looking at e.g. sunset, full moon, or even just a film on tv, or the food I was about to eat.  It was much worse on holiday as I would spend much of the time just taking photos of the same scenery from different angles, distances, day, sunset, night, and when the traffic was busy or calm, just to get that perfect shot, and instead of picking the best photos and deleting the rest, I ended up keeping them all because I couldn't decide which one was the best, and because I felt like each photo was a memory of the holiday because I spent most of the time just taking photos lol.  I then stopped taking the camera so that I could take in the proper atmosphere of each holiday, but I then found myself keeping receipts and food wrappers each day so I could preserve the memory of everything I did.  Other people just write a diary, but my version of a diary was through photographs, wrappers and receipts.  I got so obsessive to the point that my garage was stacked high with newspapers as I wanted to keep the memory of every major historical event that I lived through.  Thankfully one day I came to my senses and threw the whole lot in the trash.  It's funny how the desire to hold onto the memory of 'everything' can make people go to strange lengths to achieve it.  I guess that's why some people don't throw away old clothes.

 

I don't throw away my old clothes because I hope someday I will fit into them again.   :)

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littlebrowndragon
On 1/15/2021 at 3:19 PM, Still Waters said:

How many emails are in your inbox? If the answer is thousands, or if you often struggle to find a file on your computer among its cluttered hard drive, then you might be classed as a digital hoarder.

In the physical world, hoarding disorder has been recognised as a distinct psychiatric condition among people who accumulate excessive amounts of objects to the point that it prevents them living a normal life. Now, research has begun to recognise that hoarding can be a problem in the digital world, too.

 

I wonder how many thousands of £/$ was paid to the scientists for them to come up with something that is so predictable.  Being able to manage resources is a life skill.  If a person cannot manage one thing e.g. their money, then they will lack the ability to manage other of their resources e.g. their belongings.  So, an inability to manage physical belongings will inevitably relate to an inability to manage digital belongings. 

 As a former schoolteacher, I discovered that if a child was not good at my subject (maths), it was less to do with their understanding of the subject, and more to do with the lack of a life skill such as "resource management"  e.g. organisational skills.  (Organisational skills are regarded as trivial, but they actually are very advanced skills, such as the ability to distinguish the wood from the trees i.e. pick out what is significant from the mass of trivial detail.)  In one memorable incident, a pupil herself  identified a need to be more organised.  The deficiency was causing her a great deal of stress.  She also felt bad about not knowing how to organise because she thought it was something you did not have to be taught.  She thought one should be born knowing how to be organised.  Anyway, I gave her some lessons on organising computer files.  She was a quick learner.  In the end, after having been taught how to organise, her difficulty in my subject vanished.  Whereas previously I had not expected her to do very well in her final exams, she came top of the class.  That incident taught me a great deal about how to teach and, conversely, how not to teach.  Focus less on the subject and more on life skills.

 

Unfortunately, schools do not teach children how to be organised.  How could they?  Schools are chaotic.  In schools, mayhem rules. Trying to teach anything in that sort of chaos is futile.  And it is getting worse and worse.  And children are suffering as a consequence.

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littlebrowndragon

Speaking personally about organising, I routinely do clear-outs.  I now have no family mementoes.  No photos from the past, no memorabilia whatsoever.  My email is routinely organised and cleaned out.  My last big clear out was 2 years ago when I threw out everything, including my entire wardrobe (I had a bit of spare cash, then, to pay for a new wardrobe), that I had accumulated over the previous 10 years.  And I felt SO much better.  

Interesting, though that hoarding should be recognised as a problem for people.  Isn't that what we are encouraged to do with our memories?  We are always encouraged to "create memories" .  In older age, we laugh in embarrassment at our "senior moments", our failures of memory.  We keep our kinds "active", by exercising our memory.  Even at school we have to learn so much by rote.  Education focusses on memory work more than anything else.  Some of the highest professions e.g. law, medicine, comprise little more than memory work (I had a relative who was a vet, and she always complained about this).  And yet, when people develop Alzheimer's or Dementia, isn't a great deal of time spent getting the sufferer to remember their past?  Ignoring what scientists think, perhaps these mental conditions are a result of an unhealthy use of memory right from childhood i.e. of hoarding memories.   For myself, I think that forgetting is just as important as remembering.

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