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Eldorado

Nazca Lines a complex system of irrigation

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Eldorado

Mystery of the Nazca Lines unveiled!

It will be presented at the International Congress of Cultural Tourism in Cordoba in February 2021.

The Salvar Nazca team, led by engineer Carlos Hermida, discovers that the famous geoglyphs of Peru are a complex system of irrigation channels.

The Spanish engineer Carlos Enrique Hermida García will present in February 2021 , together with his team, one of the greatest discoveries in the world of archaeology at an international level. According to his words, "not only have we unveiled the mystery with numerous and conclusive proofs, but we have also discovered a system that can save millions of lives around the world".

Full story at PressAT UK: Link

3mins 40secs

 

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Timothy

Will look forward to their ‘numerous and conclusive proofs’ and the system they discovered ‘that can save millions of lives around the world.

These claims read rather dubiously.

And why wait until February if you have a system which can save millions of lives around the world? Share the info.

Edited by Timothy
Typo.
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Robotic Jew

And obviously the aliens taught them how to irrigate the desert with drawing of hummingbirds and weird looking dudes...

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Tom1200

Interesting... except that they will rather lonely if they go to Cordoba.  There will be a conference in Barcelona on Feb 11-12 which is only 1000 km away, so perhaps they're planning a daily commute.

It took about a minute of lazy research to find this out.  https://waset.org/cultural-tourism-conferences  It seriously bothers me that the same story can be found on a thousand sites yet nobody appears to have checked this?

Or perhaps they're going to present to the Eleventh International Conference on Religion & Spirituality in Society, which will be meeting in Cordoba in June? https://religioninsociety.com/2021-conference

It remains to be seen whether this team can justify their claims.  Personally I doubt either that the lines or the theory are watertight.  The typical depth of the lines is 12-15 inches (nat_geog) which will not hold much water compared to genuine irrigation projects such as those found at Angkor Wat.  The very longest lines are tens of km and run unbroken over hills and dips.  The scientists might struggle to explain how these were used to carry water without any serious embankments.

The earliest references I can find linked to this theory are Rossel Castro (1977 or 1942) and Johnson et al (2002), both of who link the lines and images to sources of water, but neither appears to claim they form an irrigation system.

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Earl.Of.Trumps

Two issues: One, I find it peculiar that in the history of the Christian faith, Christians have always envisioned that god, the angels, saints,
and all the souls in a "heaven" are all above the clouds, and one must look UP of course to be looking toward heaven. Now, what is so hard 
to envision that the Nazca culture feels similarly in that their gods are above the clouds, hence, that is the reason why the lines are created 
to be seen from above only. The "made to be seen by ET" - theory is without substantiation and is likely total bull, IMO.

Secondly, this theory of "irrigation" is - IMO, just some researcher trying to make headlines and make a name for himself. I don't buy it.

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Tatetopa

Physical evidence can be interpreted.  The minds of people and their esoteric reasons for creating seemingly non-functional artifacts can't be accurately reproduced without introducing bias from the interpreter and their own culture.

I notice the Nazca lines are still part of one of the driest deserts on earth.  There is no reported evidence of organic remains in their vicinity.  If it had been for irrigation, you would expect some evidence remaining in the soil.  

Like good engineers, the Spanish team could recreate the lines somewhere else and test their theory.   Wanna bet they never do?

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Seti42

If they were used for irrigation, there would be evidence of water flow erosion in the geoglyphs themselves. Some would likely also still channel water. There's no evidence, that I've seen, of either.

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ercbreeze

Makes sense: Draw various and artistic pictures in the desert to irrigate.   (sarcasm here)

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keithisco

Irrigation in Nazca was effected using the subterranean Puqois system - which is well described (at least since 2003) and have no relationship to the geoglyphs. Dodgy research is my guess:

Quote

 

The puquios of Nazca are thought to have been built by both the Paracas and Nasca cultures. The former group occupied the area roughly between 800 BCE and 200 BCE, and the Nasca from 200 BCE to 650 CE[8] near the city of Nazca, Peru.

The technology of puquios is similar to that of the qanats of Iran and Makhmur, Iraq, and other ancient filtration galleries known in numerous societies in the Old World and China, which appear to have been developed independently.[9] They are a sophisticated way to provide water from underground aquifers in arid regions.

While it was noted in 1992 that the puquios of Nazca had never been fully mapped, nor excavated,[2] satellite imaging in the 21st century has revealed that the system was more extensive in the Nazca region than previously thought. Scholars have been able to see how the "puquios were distributed across the Nazca region, and where they ran in relation to nearby settlements – which are easier to date." The Italian team that conducted this study concluded in 2016 that the puquios are pre-Hispanic.[10] In addition, RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems), or drones, were used in 2016 to map and document five sample aqueduct systems in the Nazca region.[8]

In their book Irrigation and Society in the Peruvian Desert (2003) and earlier writings, Katharina Schreiber and Josue Lancho Rojas explore puquios and show evidence that these works were built by a pre-Hispanic civilization. On the other hand, Monica Barnes and David Fleming argue that Schreiber and Rojas misinterpreted evidence, presumably ignoring easier explanations for a construction in colonial times.[6]

As a result of some late 20th-century radiocarbon dating of organic materials and accelerator mass spectrometer analysis of rock varnishes, some puquios were dated to around the 6th or 7th century CE.[11] Some archaeologists contend that the puquios were built by Pre-Hispanic people around 540 CE in response to two prolonged droughts during that time.

 

Wiki

Edited by keithisco
Rubbish spelling

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Hammerclaw
On 1/21/2021 at 5:38 AM, Eldorado said:

Mystery of the Nazca Lines unveiled!

It will be presented at the International Congress of Cultural Tourism in Cordoba in February 2021.

The Salvar Nazca team, led by engineer Carlos Hermida, discovers that the famous geoglyphs of Peru are a complex system of irrigation channels.

The Spanish engineer Carlos Enrique Hermida García will present in February 2021 , together with his team, one of the greatest discoveries in the world of archaeology at an international level. According to his words, "not only have we unveiled the mystery with numerous and conclusive proofs, but we have also discovered a system that can save millions of lives around the world".

Full story at PressAT UK: Link

3mins 40secs

 

No, they're just darker surface material scraped off a few inches to expose the lighter sub strata.

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