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Hammerclaw

Spiritualism, Secularism, Atheism

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Hammerclaw

This an open discussion about the significance and impact of the choices we make of life philosophies, religions and spiritualism and their impact on each of our personal lives. What our choices mean to us, personally, how they color and compliment our existence. Why we each think our own choices are best for us. One may expect widely divergent viewpoints, deviating sharply from others, at times. This is meant to be an eclectic thread, not just for any particular viewpoint, open to all spiritual and secular, as not all all life philosophies are necessarily religious or spiritual. I ask that we be kind to one another and withhold harsh criticisms and judgment. All are welcome here.

Edited by Hammerclaw
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Hammerclaw

When one is born of religious parents in a nuclear household, one absorbs the casual indoctrination of religion as a natural thing, oblivious of the wider world and it's differences. My childhood was homogenously Scotch-Irish, steeped in Calvinist roots and Southern Baptist. To my young mind, the tenets of that Faith were universal truths, known to everyone and undeniable. It was not until older that I realized not all of our neighbors were of like-mind. The iconography of Christianity were throughout the house in the form of pictures and Bibles and particularly in my mind I remember a cardboard manger scene diorama I still have in my late parent's effects  Our community wasn't a neighborhood, it was a church, a gathering place around which our sense of community, family and friends revolved. All scattered throughout the city, that community congregated ever Sunday. Not the religion, not the tenets, not the sermons or the songs, the strongest memory of that time of my life is Community.

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Hammerclaw

;)

Edited by Hammerclaw
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Guyver
1 hour ago, Hammerclaw said:

This an open discussion about the significance and impact of the choices we make of life philosophies, religions and spiritualism and their impact on each of our personal lives. What our choices mean to us, personally, how they color and compliment our existence. Why we each think our own choices are best for us. One may expect widely divergent viewpoints, deviating sharply from others, at times. This is meant to be an eclectic thread, not just for any particular viewpoint, open to all spiritual and secular, as not all all life philosophies are necessarily religious or spiritual. I ask that we be kind to one another and withhold harsh criticisms and judgment. All are welcome here.

I’m in what some have called an “Existential Crisis.”  Well, that sounds so extreme, “crisis” but whatever, I guess I admit it is a crisis of sorts.  Anyway, my problem is that right now I have nothing to believe in besides myself.... and, well.  I do know me a little, so....anyway.  I guess that’s about it.

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zep73

I knew nothing, when Christianity hit me in the mid 80's. I was 10 years old.

There was no internet or science around. And my brain was immature. I accepted it for a few years, until I got wiser.

Now I meet adults defending and justifying the Bible all over the internet. Did they never mature and wise up?

Obviously not. It's sad. Embarrasing.

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Hammerclaw
6 minutes ago, Guyver said:

I’m in what some have called an “Existential Crisis.”  Well, that sounds so extreme, “crisis” but whatever, I guess I admit it is a crisis of sorts.  Anyway, my problem is that right now I have nothing to believe in besides myself.... and, well.  I do know me a little, so....anyway.  I guess that’s about it.

No, don't shortchange yourself. Believe me, there are lessons in your life experience valuable to yourself and others, We all lose our way, within and without, at times. You're not too old for the adventure of finding yourself again. Give it a try. You ARE somebody.

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Hammerclaw
9 minutes ago, zep73 said:

I knew nothing, when Christianity hit me in the mid 80's. I was 10 years old.

There was no internet or science around. And my brain was immature. I accepted it for a few years, until I got wiser.

Now I meet adults defending and justifying the Bible all over the internet. Did they never mature and wise up?

Obviously not. It's sad. Embarrasing.

This isn't about them, it's about you, the path you chose in life and how things have gone with you. It's not about their choices, it's about yours, no religion required.

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zep73
Just now, Hammerclaw said:

This isn't about them, it's about you, the path you chose in life and how things have gone with you. It's not about their choices, it's about yours, no religion required.

I chose truth and facts.

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Guyver
2 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

You ARE somebody.

Firstly, thank you for the sentiment,  Secondly, everybody is somebody.  So, I guess the question really becomes, are we who we want to be, or are we not really smart enough to think of asking ourselves that question, if you know what I mean.

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Guyver

To answer honestly, I am who I want to be and wouldn’t change a thing.  I wouldn’t wish to have lived less than I have as I value life, so I have no complaints.  Except for one kinda big one.  Things aren’t as I wish them to be.  But, I guess you prolly know what they say about wishes...you can wish in one hand and sssshhh in the other and see which get filled first.  
 

Anyway, things are not as I wish and there is no changing them, so that is a problem for me that I have to deal with.

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Hammerclaw
Just now, Guyver said:

Firstly, thank you for the sentiment,  Secondly, everybody is somebody.  So, I guess the question really becomes, are we who we want to be, or are we not really smart enough to think of asking ourselves that question, if you know what I mean.

One day you look in the mirror and accept the good you see in your reflection, embraces the good person you are, flawed as any human being, but a lot better than you might have been. It's easy to be down on yourself, 'till you see someone really bad off and realize, there, but for the grace of God or circumstance go I.

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Hammerclaw
5 minutes ago, zep73 said:

I chose truth and facts.

Then choose to reveal the truth and facts about yourself. It's easy rail against the choices of others. The challenge is to explain one's own.

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Nuclear Wessel
Quote

What our choices mean to us, personally, how they color and compliment our existence. Why we each think our own choices are best for us.

This is an interesting idea. I am cautiously optimistic about how this thread will go, but we shall see.

That being said, my spirituality, life philosophy, and beliefs are an amalgam of both choices and non-choices; a mixed-bag, so to speak.

Certainly I see my life philosophies as a choice: I make an active, conscious choice to seek truth, knowledge, and wisdom on a daily basis to become the best version of myself that I can be.

The extent of my religiosity and spirituality, however, is merely a byproduct of the choices I have made: not inherently active choices in and of themselves.

For example: I don't actively choose to disbelieve in an afterlife, a god, etc; rather, in the development of my philosophies I adopted a habit of seeking objectivity when and where possible and, as such, the notion of a god, afterlife, etc... is not really congruent with those endeavours. This is why I am an agnostic atheist: I can't be certain of whether or not god exists but the existence of any god has not been evinced through my experiences, observations, and acquired knowledge of how the universe operates.

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Hammerclaw
1 minute ago, Nuclear Wessel said:

This is an interesting idea. I am cautiously optimistic about how this thread will go, but we shall see.

That being said, my spirituality, life philosophy, and beliefs are an amalgam of both choices and non-choices; a mixed-bag, so to speak.

Certainly I see my life philosophies as a choice: I make an active, conscious choice to seek truth, knowledge, and wisdom on a daily basis to become the best version of myself that I can be.

The extent of my religiosity and spirituality, however, is merely a byproduct of the choices I have made: not inherently active choices in and of themselves.

For example: I don't actively choose to disbelieve in an afterlife, a god, etc; rather, in the development of my philosophies I adopted a habit of seeking objectivity when and where possible and, as such, the notion of a god, afterlife, etc... is not really congruent with those endeavours. This is why I am an agnostic atheist: I can't be certain of whether or not god exists but the existence of any god has not been evinced through my experiences, observations, and acquired knowledge of how the universe operates.

The most important and precious things are what works for you. We will be privileged by how much we each choose to share about our choices. Some may see avenues of discussion even implementation of some of those choices in their own lives. This thread will go as all threads go in this forum; only as long as it interests.

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Guyver
49 minutes ago, zep73 said:

I knew nothing, when Christianity hit me in the mid 80's. I was 10 years old.

There was no internet or science around. And my brain was immature. I accepted it for a few years, until I got wiser.

Now I meet adults defending and justifying the Bible all over the internet. Did they never mature and wise up?

Obviously not. It's sad. Embarrasing.

You should see the people at theologyonline.  They have had the cool aid.

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Hammerclaw
10 minutes ago, Guyver said:

You should see the people at theologyonline.  They have had the cool aid.

Was it grape, my favorite? Are they happy in their choices? Do their choices harm anyone else? Honestly, I am a believer, at least in something, but I'd prefer the happy life of an atheist than live a miserable one as a believer. I don't believe in a God that would damn someone to Hell for not being brilliant enough to divine his existence. God is for everyone or no one.

Edited by Hammerclaw
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papageorge1

I'm choosing 'Spiritualism' of the three in the title. The paranormal/spiritual evidence has caused me to disqualify the materialist worldview associated with secularism and atheism.

Spiritualism has led me to a personal philosophy of love, detachment and peace. Can't thank that view enough.

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Hammerclaw
18 minutes ago, papageorge1 said:

I'm choosing 'Spiritualism' of the three in the title. The paranormal/spiritual evidence has caused me to disqualify the materialist worldview associated with secularism and atheism.

Spiritualism has led me to a personal philosophy of love, detachment and peace. Can't thank that view enough.

It is good to know where one stands. Feel welcome to share more of your personal conclusions and choices and the impact on your life and loved ones.

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Will Do
1 hour ago, Hammerclaw said:

God is for everyone or no one.

 

Yes that's true.

But is everyone or no one for God?

 

 

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Hammerclaw
2 hours ago, Will Do said:

 

Yes that's true.

But is everyone or no one for God?

 

 

We have nothing God needs, Will, certainly not the arrogance and hubris of pride in declaring allegiance. We exist only at the sufferance of the Universe, Will, and whatever God's there be. 

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Xeno-Fish

Magick, because having a sense of control and stability helps in a chaotic world, regardless of entities, gods, angels or demons existing. So agnosticism with benefits. 

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jmccr8

Hi Hammer

When I was young I read a lot of ghost/supernatural/sci-fi and at some point it seemed like it was no different than Sant and the Easter bunny they were stories and always found the act of living far more inviting. I don't know how or why we exist nor is it that important to me, do I have a purpose yes I created one for myself. Did I make the best choices not always and there were choices that I did not want to make either, do I regret them, not really everything costs something and education isn't free so I take it for what it was a lesson.

Science sufficiently answers most things I don't need absolutes about anything I am just hitch-hiking through town anyway once I am dead everything I have learnt or experience passes with me an I can only experience now. I know that I am the only person that has been with me and will be with me till the day I die so I want to like that guy I see in the mirror once a day maybe twice if I have to get cleaned up to go out in the evening after work but these days there is no where to go.

There are 8 billion people out there and lots of them have a story and I will listen but I am critical about what I hear or see, I have had experiences that I can not explain nor did the seem significant enough to project other interpretations just so I could have and answer. Basically a live and let live kind of guy.

jmccr8

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Guyver
9 hours ago, Will Do said:

 

Yes that's true.

But is everyone or no one for God?

 

 

Aren’t we not equipped to answer that?  Many people think they have the answer to that and claim a certain “knowing” about God, but they don’t do anything except make claims.  For example, I was watching a PhD who got “enlightenment “ on YouTube yesterday and considering what he had to say.  He made many claims about God, and what (it) is like, and also that all of us have a “guardian” angel.  But, he never stated HOW he knows this.  What good does that do?  It only appeals to those who already believe it, or want to, in the first place.  
 

I would love to believe that I have a guardian angel, as does everyone who lives, but I would consider it foolish to believe that just because someone says it.  At the same time, I have had experiences that could be attributed to a guardian angel, but it could be that or something else since I have no way of knowing.  Something saved me a time or two, I’m sure of that, but what it was and why it did it, I have no idea.  

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Will Do

 

Everyone knows what's true. 

But not everyone declares allegiance to it.

 

 

Edited by Will Do

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Guyver
20 minutes ago, Will Do said:

 

Everyone knows what's true. 

No, everyone does not know what is true.  You just proved my point.  It’s just claims that people make with no evidence to support it.

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