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Sherapy

Mindfulness

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Sherapy
5 hours ago, third_eye said:

Master Oogway knows the way... 

~

Love this. :wub:

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Sherapy
11 hours ago, eight bits said:

Schrodinger believed it, whether he used those exact words (particularly the phasing whatever) is more doubtsful.

In 1944, He gave a widely avaliable essay-lecture What is Life? which has an epilogue. Determinism and Free Will, in which he argues that there is one mind, and that it corresponds with typical western divine notions. The "singularity" business in the quasi-quote may be because he used the Latin phrase singulare tantum ("single as such"), an obscure term for the unusual noun that has no plural grammatical form. Anyway, he clearly regards consciousness as a singulare tantum.

Well, what of consciousnesses, then? In the essay, he asserted that separate consciousnesses (e.g. yours, mine and his are three rather than one) is an illusion:

In a later essay, Mind and Matter, Schrodinger writes:

and

Is there a closer version still? I don't know. I have some experience with hunting down Jung pseudoquotes which, when they aren't fanciful (as this one isn't, Schrodinger believed what is remarkable about the proposed phrasing), are either mash-ups of things he said in different places or paraphrases of things he probably did believe, but (so far as I can tell) didn't say in the exact words offered. Plus, of course, Jung and Schrodinger both wrote things in German and so translator liberties are possible in some cases.

Will is close enough for government work, IMO, to a correct representation of Schrodinger's beliefs.

Excellent contribution between you and 3rd, great job both of you. Very fun to read. 
 

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On 2/8/2021 at 10:55 AM, Sherapy said:

A big aspect of Mindfulness for me is meditation, which is also a significant component of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy along with grounding, laughter, a support system, breathing (to release calming endorphins) the idea is to be fully present/aware of the moment.

Hi Sherapy

I had to think on this for a bit, to me growing up where I did with the parents I had pretty much had mindfulness driven into me to be aware of my surroundings. I was raised to be seen and not heard so I observed and when I was out and about I had fun. When I started working they did not have safety on work sites like they do now and I did a lot of high risk work so I was very mindful of my environment as working 200' above ground walking a 10" I beam with no harness was about me trusting me and I would not let others bleed their fear into me to cause doubt in myself.

I was taught that I was on my own and to be my own support group and not to depend on others which is how I still am so I observed and still do. I don't think that there has been much conscious practice since my early days because it is a habit. I agree with laughter being a positive and really do not practice worrying about things I've seen bad and it didn't kill me.:D

jmccr8

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Sherapy
11 minutes ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Sherapy

I had to think on this for a bit, to me growing up where I did with the parents I had pretty much had mindfulness driven into me to be aware of my surroundings. I was raised to be seen and not heard so I observed and when I was out and about I had fun. When I started working they did not have safety on work sites like they do now and I did a lot of high risk work so I was very mindful of my environment as working 200' above ground walking a 10" I beam with no harness was about me trusting me and I would not let others bleed their fear into me to cause doubt in myself.

I was taught that I was on my own and to be my own support group and not to depend on others which is how I still am so I observed and still do. I don't think that there has been much conscious practice since my early days because it is a habit. I agree with laughter being a positive and really do not practice worrying about things I've seen bad and it didn't kill me.:D

jmccr8

Love this, what a great example of mindfulness (paying attention openly and non judgmentally)in practice. 
 

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Sherapy
19 hours ago, Will Do said:

 

Being conscious of the singular mind of the universe is the greatest potential of mindfulness.

 

 

Question: how does this tie into mindfulness for you? I am interested in your thoughts. 

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Liquid Gardens
22 hours ago, Sherapy said:

Indeed, well said. A few moments of being fully present is truly awe inspiring.

E0366AE5-1993-4846-8532-C3765644442C.jpeg

I think this is what my mindfulness might be reserved to, nature.  Although I can definitely understand how it could be effective for therapeutic purposes as well as a more full-time mindset I'm not sure how often I could integrate it too much into my regular life.  My work life I treat now as essentially an almost endless list of to-do's of various length, each of which typically require enough of my focus and attention that I'm not sure I could do that and simultaneously think about being in the now and stepping back to analyze what I'm thinking and feeling (although I think it can be helpful to be attentive to your own reaction (i.e. stress) from your work as that is something that can be mitigated).  I read part of Xeno's link I think it was to Burroughs and although what he described sounds like an interesting exercise I don't think I can or would really want to achieve mindfulness for mundane things.  I just cleaned out my sink and put dishes in the dishwasher, I semi-hate cleaning out my sink and putting dishes in the dishwasher, if I focused on what I was doing and lived in the moment I'm just going to get ticked off because according to the magazines and comics I read as a kid I should have a #@$&% robot servant to take care of this all for me by now. :tu:

But I think appreciation for nature for me is completely linked to mindfulness and being entirely in the moment.  For me there can be an accumulation of I guess I'd call it 'the artificial' at times that just comes from society I guess.  There's plenty about human co-existence that is fantastic and as meaningful as anything, but there can be just so much human noise.  Politics, economics, insurance, marketing, taxes, bills, and of course an endless stream of grade-A pure miscellaneous BS firehosing us in the face constantly nowadays; it's all so un-natural and everyday, I wonder how much of it challenges and stresses and opposes a more natural state that our brains have perhaps evolved to have as its equilibrium.  A lot of these artificials carry some amount of at least 'concern' or 'worry' or 'aggravation' to many people, and since civilization is really such a recent development in the history of our species I wonder if the 'normal experience' of our 21st century lives are ahead of our brain's evolutionary development right now.  

Then you look at your picture above and that stuff can seem so tiny in comparison.  I can imagine how the sand would feel in bare feet, the wet rocks, the salt smell, the rhythm of the surf, all of it really so ancient compared to the blink of time we're around for.  And no big deal, that's just a star in the sky.  It's just so real and ridiculous that it's something we can experience and are a part of, most the times I don't need to try, these appreciations pull me into and cement me in the now for a while.  The bonus is that these perspectives can last and can help with the navigation of new concerns that need our attention, so I can definitely understand how practicing mindfulness more frequently can be healthy.

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35 minutes ago, Sherapy said:

Question: how does this tie into mindfulness for you? I am interested in your thoughts. 

Hi Sherapy

I have to wonder that if there is a mind of the universe as to why it would create component minds that are in conflict.

jmccr8

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third_eye

Sometimes I have to remind myself that the interpretations that is dragged along with the translation of the ancient texts / scriptures are most oftentimes bound and gagged with modern logic death grips dictated by Aristotle's lexicon of of meaningful units.

Languages didn't function in the same breath before that. From my experience, a lot of the words used in translation is watered down and sliced thin just to make a structured form of linguistic sense to the common reader. 

Texts like the Upanishads or the TaoTe'ching contains many same words with different connotations at different places depending on the context.

My favorite logic maze twirling at the gap between the jaws of mind and consciousness ...

Quote
 
11 May 2016 — The Diamond Sutra, a Sanskrit text translated into Chinese, was one of 40,000 scrolls and documents hidden in “ The Cave ...
 
 
 
 
 
Diamond Sutra, Sanskrit Vajraccedika-sutra (“Diamond Cutter Sutra”), brief and very popular Mahayana Buddhist text widely used in East Asia and perhaps ...

~

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Sherapy
1 hour ago, Liquid Gardens said:

I think this is what my mindfulness might be reserved to, nature.  Although I can definitely understand how it could be effective for therapeutic purposes as well as a more full-time mindset I'm not sure how often I could integrate it too much into my regular life.  My work life I treat now as essentially an almost endless list of to-do's of various length, each of which typically require enough of my focus and attention that I'm not sure I could do that and simultaneously think about being in the now and stepping back to analyze what I'm thinking and feeling (although I think it can be helpful to be attentive to your own reaction (i.e. stress) from your work as that is something that can be mitigated).  I read part of Xeno's link I think it was to Burroughs and although what he described sounds like an interesting exercise I don't think I can or would really want to achieve mindfulness for mundane things.  I just cleaned out my sink and put dishes in the dishwasher, I semi-hate cleaning out my sink and putting dishes in the dishwasher, if I focused on what I was doing and lived in the moment I'm just going to get ticked off because according to the magazines and comics I read as a kid I should have a #@$&% robot servant to take care of this all for me by now. :tu:

But I think appreciation for nature for me is completely linked to mindfulness and being entirely in the moment.  For me there can be an accumulation of I guess I'd call it 'the artificial' at times that just comes from society I guess.  There's plenty about human co-existence that is fantastic and as meaningful as anything, but there can be just so much human noise.  Politics, economics, insurance, marketing, taxes, bills, and of course an endless stream of grade-A pure miscellaneous BS firehosing us in the face constantly nowadays; it's all so un-natural and everyday, I wonder how much of it challenges and stresses and opposes a more natural state that our brains have perhaps evolved to have as its equilibrium.  A lot of these artificials carry some amount of at least 'concern' or 'worry' or 'aggravation' to many people, and since civilization is really such a recent development in the history of our species I wonder if the 'normal experience' of our 21st century lives are ahead of our brain's evolutionary development right now.  

Then you look at your picture above and that stuff can seem so tiny in comparison.  I can imagine how the sand would feel in bare feet, the wet rocks, the salt smell, the rhythm of the surf, all of it really so ancient compared to the blink of time we're around for.  And no big deal, that's just a star in the sky.  It's just so real and ridiculous that it's something we can experience and are a part of, most the times I don't need to try, these appreciations pull me into and cement me in the now for a while.  The bonus is that these perspectives can last and can help with the navigation of new concerns that need our attention, so I can definitely understand how practicing mindfulness more frequently can be healthy.

Wowza! I enjoyed reading this immensely. Gold star LG. 

 


And I can relate profoundly, for me too nature in and of itself invokes mindfulness, period. I can’t think of a time I wasn’t commanded to attention, humbled, blissed out by the ocean, or rendered speechless silently meditative by a Hermosa Beach sun spun yellow and fire orange sunset. Or felt all my troubles wash away, with the night tide, poof- letting go/acceptance. 

Great point we can almost all agree that the pic posted gives a moment of pause, anyone can appreciate it. 

 

I love how you thread your humanness thru your post too. For me, on any path I think both positive and negatives serve a purpose. I leave room for my own humanness in life too, it is fine just to be authentic and it is a good thing to have things come up that one has to solve, resolve, refine, challenge, fix, let go, change, grow etc.

Hammerclaw once said that he loved all of his experiences even the hard ones, the heartbreak, the tears, the joy,the love, the angst, and loss etc. and that he would not change one moment. You post is similar but uniquely you.

 

 For me, I see both paths as mindfulness, folks living  their life whatever it is and is grateful for it. 
 

Thank you for your post it was so fun to read.
 

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Sherapy
1 hour ago, third_eye said:

Sometimes I have to remind myself that the interpretations that is dragged along with the translation of the ancient texts / scriptures are most oftentimes bound and gagged with modern logic death grips dictated by Aristotle's lexicon of of meaningful units.

Languages didn't function in the same breath before that. From my experience, a lot of the words used in translation is watered down and sliced thin just to make a structured form of linguistic sense to the common reader. 

Texts like the Upanishads or the TaoTe'ching contains many same words with different connotations at different places depending on the context.

My favorite logic maze twirling at the gap between the jaws of mind and consciousness ...

~

I will have to make room for another book it seems. :P:wub:

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Hammerclaw

I'm very mindful of the memory of walking on the beach for the first time, the smell of the sea, the cries of the gulls, the texture of wet sand between my toes, stepping on a stinging jellyfish, getting horribly sunburned--good times.:yes:

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Sherapy
1 hour ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Sherapy

I have to wonder that if there is a mind of the universe as to why it would create component minds that are in conflict.

jmccr8

That is an interesting inquiry, Jay. It doesn’t make sense because to me either it is our ability to form communities and cooperate that helped us advance as a species. 
 

I have no good answers. :blush:

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Guyver
On 2/8/2021 at 9:55 AM, Sherapy said:

 

Hi everyone, 

 

Eighty and I collaborated on a new thread idea that is mindful of us all.
 

This is about mindfulness and what it means to you. There are no right or wrongs, just sharing ideas. 

 

For me, Mindfulness a new movement that is not only finding its way into my day to day, but into my work environment too and it doesn’t matter what path one is on as it can be seen in many walks of life regardless, if one is spiritual, skeptical, or a believer. 

A big aspect of Mindfulness for me is meditation, which is also a significant component of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy along with grounding, laughter, a support system, breathing (to release calming endorphins) the idea is to be fully present/aware of the moment.
 

I offer 3 practices for this thread:

Approach others perspectives non judgmentally (meaning do not just label anyone’s contributions as good or bad with no context.)

Do not engage in or create drama (past behaviors do not matter in this thread) let’s try and see each other with fresh eyes and with any habitual reactions instead observe them as if it is a car driving by. Step back from reactive responses in favor of posting reflective considerate posts. 

Let’s use our voices to question, contribute, mull over, inspire, respectfully challenge, and give feedback pro or con, suggestions and quotes, videos and links to read are welcomed. All voices are valued and appreciated.

C55B1CDD-A326-4905-90BE-A7CFB2CB3E36.jpeg

That is such a well thought out OP, my congrats to you and 8, both wise and good humans.  For me, mindfulness as I know about it came from a time for me when I went to AA and worked the twelve step program successfully.  It simultaneously occurred with me losing all religious beliefs.  Anyway, I began to study Buddhism a bit and found a wise Buddhist I respect and that’s when mindfulness began to really mean something to me.  I wholeheartedly embrace it, in fact, it has helped me re-think what I believe “God” may be.

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Guyver

I think mindfulness is so powerful it can help any thinking human on any level.

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Sherapy
14 minutes ago, Guyver said:

That is such a well thought out OP, my congrats to you and 8, both wise and good humans.  For me, mindfulness as I know about it came from a time for me when I went to AA and worked the twelve step program successfully.  It simultaneously occurred with me losing all religious beliefs.  Anyway, I began to study Buddhism a bit and found a wise Buddhist I respect and that’s when mindfulness began to really mean something to me.  I wholeheartedly embrace it, in fact, it has helped me re-think what I believe “God” may be.

Wow, how interesting. I just marvel at how you worked thru religion to become mindful. I knew you when you were super Christian. You literally a fabulous example of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in action. What a change. What specifically helped you. How did AA catapulte this journey? I think the golf course for you is your living meditation. 

Thank you for sharing. 

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Mr Walker
14 hours ago, eight bits said:

Well, we're off to a shaky start:

That sounds like a confusion with Schopenhauer, one of his famous poodles was named Atman. Kak gives no source, but does cite Moore's biography of Schrodinger elsewhere, and Moore digresses on Schopenhauer, including that particular dog. Maybe Kak got confused or misremembered.

better link for Kak:

http://www.hinduwisdom.info/articles_hinduism/146.htm

The only dog I know of for Schrodinger is a collie named Burschie in the 1940's, who makes a cameo appearance in What is Life?

Meh, physicists? philosophers? Tell me about their dogs!

Anyway, the article does include a version of the money quote:

I don't doubt that Schrodinger was selective in his reading of the Upanishads - that's very Western, no? So I don't question what you quoted, either.

But Will wins this round. That specific portion of Indian thought was restated with approval by Schrodinger, as claimed, and repeatedly so.

What would a physicist be without a dog ?

A physicist 

What would a philosopher be without a dog  ?

Unemployed :)  

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Guyver

 

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Guyver
8 minutes ago, Sherapy said:

Wow, how interesting. I just marvel at how you worked thru religion to become mindful. I knew you when you were super Christian. You literally a fabulous example of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in action. What a change. What specifically helped you. How did AA catapulte this journey?

Thank you for sharing. 

I could write a book on that question, and probably should.

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Mr Walker
2 hours ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Sherapy

I have to wonder that if there is a mind of the universe as to why it would create component minds that are in conflict.

jmccr8

My answer would be that his is because none of it is designed and created.

it is all a product of evolution and thus incomplete, evolving, and imperfect. 

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Sherapy
Just now, Guyver said:

I could write a book on that question, and probably should.

Yes, you should. It would be interesting. 

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third_eye
1 hour ago, Sherapy said:

I will have to make room for another book it seems. :P:wub:

Don't need to buy this one, there's plenty available with various degrees of quality online

I like to compare the translations from the past to the recent. Very eye opening, as the pun goes... 

~

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Sherapy
1 minute ago, third_eye said:

Don't need to buy this one, there's plenty available with various degrees of quality online

I like to compare the translations from the past to the recent. Very eye opening, as the pun goes... 

~

Thank you for the recommendation.:wub:

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Sherapy
21 minutes ago, Guyver said:

 

Thank you for this Guyver, I have learned some  of what I am hearing and hear some new ways to look at meditation too. I am 10 mins in and love this video. I look forward to listening to the whole thing. Stay tuned. 

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Guyver
34 minutes ago, Sherapy said:

Wow, how interesting. I just marvel at how you worked thru religion to become mindful. I knew you when you were super Christian. You literally a fabulous example of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in action. What a change. What specifically helped you. How did AA catapulte this journey? I think the golf course for you is your living meditation. 

Thank you for sharing. 

You are so right about the golf course for me.  I am so thankful for it.  Yes, in the case of my golf, it is mindfulness.  I already know I can make all the shots, but the problem is I can’t make them all when I want to lol.  So anyway, mindfulness to me is the strict consideration of ones actions,  and how those actions effect others.  and.....if one is really practicing, it’s called meta cognition which means that you are so mindful that you actually consider how other people think and feel about certain things....like you, yourself, and your behavior.  It’s just the way of peace in my mind.

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third_eye
13 minutes ago, Sherapy said:

Thank you for the recommendation.:wub:

No worries, I once met a Japanese professor who taught creative writing, he studied a lot of zen writings.

Told me a funny observation of his, he admired Zen philosophy because it helps and makes a person complete, or better, helps a Christian be a better Christian, as it does a Muslim, or a soldier, a teacher, a student and so on and so forth... 

The funny thing is it makes a Buddhist only more confused... 

:lol:

I believe that's the very distinct form of Japanese humor... 

~

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