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Eldorado

Nessie related to extinct 'serpentine whales'

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Eldorado

An American investigator of mysterious animals and legendary creatures has focused on the Loch Ness Monster in his new book and is convinced the creature is descended from an ancient group of extinct serpentine whales.

Globe-trotting cryptozoologist Ken Gerhard has written The Essential Guide To The Loch Ness Monster and Other Aquatic Cryptids, drawing on interviews with leading Nessie experts and reported encounters.

It also features a foreword by Steve Feltham who has set a world record for the longest continuous vigil of looking for Nessie, having been watching the loch for the past 30 years.

Full story at the Ross-shire Journal: Link

Edited by Eldorado
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Dejarma
47 minutes ago, Eldorado said:

drawing on interviews with leading Nessie experts

experts, funny:rolleyes:

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the13bats

Has ken gerhard lost it?

So many who get into crypto, ghosts aliens whatever go in all legit then end up just wanting to sell books :hmm:

This serpent whale idea has come and gone gerhard wasnt its first proponent

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openozy

Nessie can be related to ancient turtle, whale or whatever. Nessie will be whatever you want her to be, ideal women really, lol.

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Hammerclaw

For Nessie to be a whale, there'd have to be a viable breeding population of fresh water odontocetes living and breeding in the Lock. Since they're air breathing mammals they'd be hard to miss, popping up everywhere frequently to breath.

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MysteryMike

What Nessie is more likely to be.

Eels

Floating logs

Seals

Sturgeons

Waves

Mystery solved.

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'Walt' E. Kurtz
6 hours ago, MysteryMike said:

What Nessie is more likely to be.

Eels

Floating logs

Seals

Sturgeons

Waves

Mystery solved.

they already have found the monster, it's a movie prop. :)

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-36024638

Edited by 'Walt' E. Kurtz
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Essan

And presumably these marine anmals walked there after the ice age?  Or did the space aliens drop them off after the ice melted and the glacial hollow turned into a lake?   No way could a whale or anything similar swim up the River Ness (seals could - in theory - only because they can survive out of the water)

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Matt221

Globe-trotting cryptozoologist ................. nice work if you can get it going all over the place looking for nowt in particular except peoples imaginations and logs

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openozy
2 hours ago, Matt221 said:

Globe-trotting cryptozoologist ................. nice work if you can get it going all over the place looking for nowt in particular except peoples imaginations and logs

Yeah, I wouldn't mind it.

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Trelane

Ah, now we're on to the prehistoric whales theory. Wonderful. It's good to just keep guessing.

Thankfully the obvious issues have already been brought up.

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President Wearer of Hats

It’s more Iike Lapras than anything else.

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openozy

What about a stone tape ghost of a whale ?

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Earl.Of.Trumps

If you want to sell your new "Nessie" book, it pay$ to have a new theory 

Whale... like Nessie is breaking the surface all the time, jeeesh

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