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Mirzam

Meditation Techniques

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Mirzam

Throughout my life I've had periods of time where I would have vivid and lively dreams for nights on end. It won't last more then a few months. Then it will be a long period of time with little to no dreams, which are usually not vivid. I've found a connection to my dreams based on diet, exercise, consumption of movies, books, and music, and life circumstances.

Has anybody found that they can control their dreams by other means and help use them to shape their reality? Has lucid dreaming helped your creativity, relaxation, or physical condition? I find that having positive dreams can help me be more productive by day and improve exercise. Lately I haven't been able to control them as well.

Especially, has anyone used binaural beats, visual meditation, or a combination of visual meditation and soundscapes?

I have found myself struggling with some steps of escaping meditation where I fall asleep or meditate within my meditation and psyche myself out. I have found stairs, stretching, and running help me regain focus.

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Bed of chaos

Good questions. Does it help my creatively, relaxation, or physical condition? Somewhat. After a lucid dream (waking up) I definitely feel excited, being able to recall my adventure. I suppose it depends what you specifically want out of it. I'm content (ld'ing) just walking around asking others questions. I think it's different for everyone. Though some other members here would definitely agree it helps creativity, relaxation, ect.

Another member asked me once if I consider lucid dreaming a form of meditation. I'm on the fence here. I'd guess its complicated. So many things can go wrong in lucid dreams. Which I believe are beyond our control. False awakenings. Something unexpected (in reality, noises) wakes us up. Who decides when a dream ends? Anyway I'd consider certain ld'ing techniques (like wake initiated lucid dreams) similar to meditation but others (dream initiated lucid dreams) not. This technique (dilds) is accomplished personally thru reality checks (I suppose conditioning) not sure this qualifies as meditation.

Last, in regards to control (if you imply having longer lucid dreams) I simply remain persistent w dream journal. Document dreams asap upon awakening. This seems to improve dream recall There's no scientifically proven induction method however this method (dilds) works for me (usually within two weeks). There's another popular method (wake back to bed) though I've never tried it.

I could dm you about one or two sites that list lucid dreaming techniques (if you wish). I cant remember if it's against forum rules to list other sites here. Anyway, its past my bedtime. Have a good night.

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Mirzam
On 2/22/2021 at 11:44 PM, Bed of chaos said:

Good questions. Does it help my creatively, relaxation, or physical condition? Somewhat. After a lucid dream (waking up) I definitely feel excited, being able to recall my adventure. I suppose it depends what you specifically want out of it. I'm content (ld'ing) just walking around asking others questions. I think it's different for everyone. Though some other members here would definitely agree it helps creativity, relaxation, ect.

Another member asked me once if I consider lucid dreaming a form of meditation. I'm on the fence here. I'd guess its complicated. So many things can go wrong in lucid dreams. Which I believe are beyond our control. False awakenings. Something unexpected (in reality, noises) wakes us up. Who decides when a dream ends? Anyway I'd consider certain ld'ing techniques (like wake initiated lucid dreams) similar to meditation but others (dream initiated lucid dreams) not. This technique (dilds) is accomplished personally thru reality checks (I suppose conditioning) not sure this qualifies as meditation.

Last, in regards to control (if you imply having longer lucid dreams) I simply remain persistent w dream journal. Document dreams asap upon awakening. This seems to improve dream recall There's no scientifically proven induction method however this method (dilds) works for me (usually within two weeks). There's another popular method (wake back to bed) though I've never tried it.

I could dm you about one or two sites that list lucid dreaming techniques (if you wish). I cant remember if it's against forum rules to list other sites here. Anyway, its past my bedtime. Have a good night.

Sure! I'd be interested. Did you mean ID'ing as in Initiated Dreaming? As in beginning a dream on a conscious level through your imagination and then falling asleep and continuing it?

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Bed of chaos
1 hour ago, smanthaonvaca said:

Sure! I'd be interested. Did you mean ID'ing as in Initiated Dreaming? As in beginning a dream on a conscious level through your imagination and then falling asleep and continuing it?

Yes, sorry (I get stuck up on terminology). Most dream sites (I think) consider that a wake initiated lucid dream. Basically going to bed and almost instantly slipping into a lucid dream (like you said). The other way many experience lucid dreams (sometimes by accident) is a dream initiated lucid dream. In a nutshell you're dreaming then realize you're (lucid) dreaming. People debate ways to increase ur odds of this happening. (I mentioned keeping a dream journal).

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Professor T
On 2/22/2021 at 3:40 PM, smanthaonvaca said:

Throughout my life I've had periods of time where I would have vivid and lively dreams for nights on end. It won't last more then a few months. Then it will be a long period of time with little to no dreams, which are usually not vivid. I've found a connection to my dreams based on diet, exercise, consumption of movies, books, and music, and life circumstances.

Has anybody found that they can control their dreams by other means and help use them to shape their reality? Has lucid dreaming helped your creativity, relaxation, or physical condition? I find that having positive dreams can help me be more productive by day and improve exercise. Lately I haven't been able to control them as well.

Especially, has anyone used binaural beats, visual meditation, or a combination of visual meditation and soundscapes?

I have found myself struggling with some steps of escaping meditation where I fall asleep or meditate within my meditation and psyche myself out. I have found stairs, stretching, and running help me regain focus.

Yes, your first observation/point is astute and on the money. I'm on a Similar wagon. Diet, consumption habits and our conscious health at the time very much affects our dreams. I've made the same connections and fallen off the wagon and gone backwards in some respects. Some times it's the falling off that teaches your what to value.

Yes, Lucid dreaming has most definitely helped me. Especially artistically. In False awakenings I usually fumble about with my Diary, and many times I've found art in it that Ive managed to replicate.

I've tried binaural beats with very little success. Meditation most definitely helps. However.. And I don't think there's much of it out there yet, but there are some aspects of Virtual Reality that basically throw the doors open to Lucidity in Dreams.. There's a particular area in the game Half-Life Alyx where glowing flies fly about you in a tunnel/cave.. It's a truly beautiful thing. And when I encountered it in VR It struck me as a gateway or meditative space so I stopped playing and just immersed myself in it for quite a while. As a result I went DILD Lucid every night afterwards for about a week. Aside from that, WBTB (wake back to bed) is a very good technique.

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Mirzam
21 hours ago, Professor T said:

Yes, your first observation/point is astute and on the money. I'm on a Similar wagon. Diet, consumption habits and our conscious health at the time very much affects our dreams. I've made the same connections and fallen off the wagon and gone backwards in some respects. Some times it's the falling off that teaches your what to value.

Yes, Lucid dreaming has most definitely helped me. Especially artistically. In False awakenings I usually fumble about with my Diary, and many times I've found art in it that Ive managed to replicate.

I've tried binaural beats with very little success. Meditation most definitely helps. However.. And I don't think there's much of it out there yet, but there are some aspects of Virtual Reality that basically throw the doors open to Lucidity in Dreams.. There's a particular area in the game Half-Life Alyx where glowing flies fly about you in a tunnel/cave.. It's a truly beautiful thing. And when I encountered it in VR It struck me as a gateway or meditative space so I stopped playing and just immersed myself in it for quite a while. As a result I went DILD Lucid every night afterwards for about a week. Aside from that, WBTB (wake back to bed) is a very good technique.

Yes, I have tried all sorts of diets and supplements throughout my life. Some have helped immensely. CBD, valerian root, protein powders (most of which I would never purchase again), olive oil and nutmeg among some others have influenced vivid dreams for me. Are there any things that you have tried that you have found to help? Given everyone's body chemistry is different.

Perhaps I should try to do a brief occasional dream diary. Seems the journal suggestion is a popular aide.

I have not tried VR. That may be interesting if I were to try it in a safe creative space. WBTB I would have to research. Sometimes I try things and later research it and find that I am already doing some version of it. I am positive I have tried DILD through trial and error. Would you suggest wbtb and dild over using media?

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Mirzam
On 2/25/2021 at 3:10 PM, Bed of chaos said:

Yes, sorry (I get stuck up on terminology). Most dream sites (I think) consider that a wake initiated lucid dream. Basically going to bed and almost instantly slipping into a lucid dream (like you said). The other way many experience lucid dreams (sometimes by accident) is a dream initiated lucid dream. In a nutshell you're dreaming then realize you're (lucid) dreaming. People debate ways to increase ur odds of this happening. (I mentioned keeping a dream journal).

When I was younger I used to journal and keep my dreams in that same journal, instead of a seperate journal. I have since discarded of all of the journals (I filled at least five of them with stories, daily activities, and dreams). Perhaps this method might work? If I add them in as bullet points to my planner or notebook?

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Professor T
17 hours ago, smanthaonvaca said:

Yes, I have tried all sorts of diets and supplements throughout my life. Some have helped immensely. CBD, valerian root, protein powders (most of which I would never purchase again), olive oil and nutmeg among some others have influenced vivid dreams for me. Are there any things that you have tried that you have found to help? Given everyone's body chemistry is different.

Perhaps I should try to do a brief occasional dream diary. Seems the journal suggestion is a popular aide.

I have not tried VR. That may be interesting if I were to try it in a safe creative space. WBTB I would have to research. Sometimes I try things and later research it and find that I am already doing some version of it. I am positive I have tried DILD through trial and error. Would you suggest wbtb and dild over using media?

Chicken is my main source of Dream/Diet improvement. There's a chemical in chicken starting with T, I forget the details, but it improves dream rate & recall. Supplements don't work, oh.. And it's better to go to bed hungry than full. Going to bed after eating will rob you of recall because digestion costs a lot of energy.

Having a Dreams and Meditations Journal is vital. I'd even go so far as to say it's a catalyst for the entire journey. The more you put into it the more you will get from it.

WBTB is as simple as getting up at 2-3am and being awake and mindful for a good 30-40 minutes before going back to bet. Bodily awareness  makes a huge difference.

VR is not as simple as it sounds and there's plenty of meditation programs out there, but finding the right zone/space that fits you can be hit and miss. Also, with any technique/space, don't over use it. Over-using or over dependence on one method will dull the tool over time. You gotta mix it up.

DILD (dream Induced lucid dreaming) is realizing you're in a dream within the dream. I would seriously suggest WBTB (wake back to bed) 2-3 am, 30, 40 minutes. And in that 30-40 minutes, drink some water and focus your awareness on you and the essence of you and feeling of you. That kind of meditation IMHO yields the best results.

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rashore

I haven't really been working with dreaming in a while, mostly just sleeping, lol. But a couple of sleeping meditations I do... 

Imagine yourself standing on a bridge over a creek that separates awake and sleeping. You have a little basket of stones. As you relax and clear your mind, allow thoughts to float up as they will, then give the thought to a stone and drop it in the creek. At some point you drift off to sleeping land, with all those stones and thoughts left behind. It can help clear your head and get better sleep. 

A physical relaxation. Starting with your head or your toes- I prefer toes to head... Chant off to yourself "X body part relax" 3-5 times. So, "toes relax, toes relax, toes relax", then "feet relax, ankles" and so on till you have told all your body parts to relax. Then proceed on to "X body part to sleep", and through your body. Finally (if you are still awake), "X body part to dream". The conscious focus on each body part relaxing and sleeping in the rhythmic repeat style can work great. This one can be done soaking in the tub to get a more relaxing soak on, just don't try to put yourself to sleep or dreams. 

And the trick yourself awake. Another mantra type. Put a "sleep well"+"awake at X time". Like "I will awaken refresh and rested"+"I will awaken at 7 AM"= "I will be rested and wake at 7AM". Extra is to set your mental timer for a few minutes before the alarm goes off if you use one. This one can help at the tail end of your sleep, so being jarred awake by the alarm isn't so sleep disrupting. You prep yourself to be rested and ready for that. 

A version of that one is for dreaming too. Mantra yourself into remembering your dreams upon waking, or trying to tell your unconscious mind to remember a lucid trigger, or something to get out of bad dreams, ect. 

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Mirzam
2 hours ago, Professor T said:

Chicken is my main source of Dream/Diet improvement. There's a chemical in chicken starting with T, I forget the details, but it improves dream rate & recall. Supplements don't work, oh.. And it's better to go to bed hungry than full. Going to bed after eating will rob you of recall because digestion costs a lot of energy.

Having a Dreams and Meditations Journal is vital. I'd even go so far as to say it's a catalyst for the entire journey. The more you put into it the more you will get from it.

WBTB is as simple as getting up at 2-3am and being awake and mindful for a good 30-40 minutes before going back to bet. Bodily awareness  makes a huge difference.

VR is not as simple as it sounds and there's plenty of meditation programs out there, but finding the right zone/space that fits you can be hit and miss. Also, with any technique/space, don't over use it. Over-using or over dependence on one method will dull the tool over time. You gotta mix it up.

DILD (dream Induced lucid dreaming) is realizing you're in a dream within the dream. I would seriously suggest WBTB (wake back to bed) 2-3 am, 30, 40 minutes. And in that 30-40 minutes, drink some water and focus your awareness on you and the essence of you and feeling of you. That kind of meditation IMHO yields the best results.

I have never found there to be any connection when I consume chicken, but it could always be the type of chicken you are consuming. Some are cooked in oils, some have crust and breading, some have other additives, and there are also different breeds of chicken but I don't know all of them. When I lived on a farm, my sister had several types of chickens and one of the types was known to lay green eggs. They were so strange, I had never seen them anywhere else before. I questioned if it were their diet. Body chemistry and other things in your diet weigh in too. The biggest influencing factor for me in recent days was my Med Marijuana card. It has helped me tremendously more than any pharma drug ever has. 

Perhaps smoking a strain that can invoke hunger would help if that is the case.

I have done some research on SSILD, SILD, MILD, WBTB and a few other DILDS and discovered I have inadvertently tried WBTB before with success. I think the organized break down of it is helpful so that I don't just wake up, moan about a good or bad dream, and fall back asleep to either a new dream or no dream.

I think the single most helpful thing would be to mix it up. I don't think MILD would work well for me, but I'll start with the organized WBTB.

Side Note - Creepishly enough I sometimes have obscure dreams and go online to read something related, so I wonder if I talk in my sleep and my phone picks it up. One night I had a dream about Narwhals, and logged in to Instagram the next morning and the top of my discover section was Narwhals! It has happened rarely so it may just be a coincidence, but maybe I could record the room as I sleep to watch myself and hear anything.

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Mirzam
2 hours ago, rashore said:

I haven't really been working with dreaming in a while, mostly just sleeping, lol. But a couple of sleeping meditations I do... 

Imagine yourself standing on a bridge over a creek that separates awake and sleeping. You have a little basket of stones. As you relax and clear your mind, allow thoughts to float up as they will, then give the thought to a stone and drop it in the creek. At some point you drift off to sleeping land, with all those stones and thoughts left behind. It can help clear your head and get better sleep. 

A physical relaxation. Starting with your head or your toes- I prefer toes to head... Chant off to yourself "X body part relax" 3-5 times. So, "toes relax, toes relax, toes relax", then "feet relax, ankles" and so on till you have told all your body parts to relax. Then proceed on to "X body part to sleep", and through your body. Finally (if you are still awake), "X body part to dream". The conscious focus on each body part relaxing and sleeping in the rhythmic repeat style can work great. This one can be done soaking in the tub to get a more relaxing soak on, just don't try to put yourself to sleep or dreams. 

And the trick yourself awake. Another mantra type. Put a "sleep well"+"awake at X time". Like "I will awaken refresh and rested"+"I will awaken at 7 AM"= "I will be rested and wake at 7AM". Extra is to set your mental timer for a few minutes before the alarm goes off if you use one. This one can help at the tail end of your sleep, so being jarred awake by the alarm isn't so sleep disrupting. You prep yourself to be rested and ready for that. 

A version of that one is for dreaming too. Mantra yourself into remembering your dreams upon waking, or trying to tell your unconscious mind to remember a lucid trigger, or something to get out of bad dreams, ect. 

So for the bridge would awake be to your left, and sleeping to your right? Or would sleeping be below you in the water, and awake is above the bridge? I tend to associate sleep with water. I think this exercise would be helpful in removing negative aspects from my dreams or for improved relaxation at rest. 

The second one I have not tried in a long time. This is the sort of meditation that I read about when I stayed over a relatives house when I was younger and then again recently a year or two ago, I was reading a book with similar methods. I have found it to be helpful for yoga or sunbathing but have not tried it for dreaming.

I have done an OK amount of experimenting with daydreaming or visualization in the bath. I don't have a tray so it's harder to read and I usually wind up relaxing or daydreaming. For the intention of dreaming, usually it is safe to use an inch or two and put a pillow or something off to the side, use aromatherapy, and space out until I'm in a trance like state or half asleep or asleep. I don't sleep for long, but when I wake up, it feels incredibly refreshing, like I've woken up twice or snapped out of a deep sleep. 

I think the alarm bit will be very helpful. I sometimes sleep through them or the noise aggravates me because I'm in too deep of a sleep to deal with it.

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rashore
12 hours ago, smanthaonvaca said:

So for the bridge would awake be to your left, and sleeping to your right? Or would sleeping be below you in the water, and awake is above the bridge? I tend to associate sleep with water. I think this exercise would be helpful in removing negative aspects from my dreams or for improved relaxation at rest. 

The second one I have not tried in a long time. This is the sort of meditation that I read about when I stayed over a relatives house when I was younger and then again recently a year or two ago, I was reading a book with similar methods. I have found it to be helpful for yoga or sunbathing but have not tried it for dreaming.

I have done an OK amount of experimenting with daydreaming or visualization in the bath. I don't have a tray so it's harder to read and I usually wind up relaxing or daydreaming. For the intention of dreaming, usually it is safe to use an inch or two and put a pillow or something off to the side, use aromatherapy, and space out until I'm in a trance like state or half asleep or asleep. I don't sleep for long, but when I wake up, it feels incredibly refreshing, like I've woken up twice or snapped out of a deep sleep. 

I think the alarm bit will be very helpful. I sometimes sleep through them or the noise aggravates me because I'm in too deep of a sleep to deal with it.

Awake and sleeping to the sides of you, yes. The bridge over the water is just the crossing point of between the two. The water isn't sleep, it's for dropping your thoughts into and let them flow away. 

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Professor T
18 hours ago, smanthaonvaca said:

The biggest influencing factor for me in recent days was my Med Marijuana card. It has helped me tremendously more than any pharma drug ever has. 

Perhaps smoking a strain that can invoke hunger would help if that is the case.

 

That's Unusual.. As a one-off tool for consciousness MJ is effective for a single mediation with super depth and focus. Maybe once a year, never more than once a month for sure..  But nothing will dull your dreams or stifle your recall rate more than per-longed use. Many of my friends use it regularly and none of them remember their dreams or claim they never dream anyway.. But once they have to stop using it for a job interview, test or lack of supply they're always___ always___ flooded with super vivid dreams that in many cases scare the stuffing out of them.

I Wouldn't use it if I were serious about dreaming.

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Mirzam
9 hours ago, Professor T said:

That's Unusual.. As a one-off tool for consciousness MJ is effective for a single mediation with super depth and focus. Maybe once a year, never more than once a month for sure..  But nothing will dull your dreams or stifle your recall rate more than per-longed use. Many of my friends use it regularly and none of them remember their dreams or claim they never dream anyway.. But once they have to stop using it for a job interview, test or lack of supply they're always___ always___ flooded with super vivid dreams that in many cases scare the stuffing out of them.

I Wouldn't use it if I were serious about dreaming.

Perhaps it is per my situation. I was having injury/muscle pains and they prescribed me some crap I barely took and wound up throwing out. It was horrid. Then they prescribed me something less potent which was alright... but it has a bunch of side effects and I don't need it now. The mj helps me focus and be productive. Its often prescribed to help people with their sleep. I guess it must come with medical necessity. I am very particular about it.

I tried a few of the methods in this thread last night. The WBTB made me talk, and I caught myself saying something but I'm not sure what it was. I didn't remember any dreams. WBTB seems to be the easiest and most natural one i've read about so far, but that could be a preference. I tried my visualization videos in the bath but they helped for meditation and not dreaming. 

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joc
Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, smanthaonvaca said:

Perhaps it is per my situation. I was having injury/muscle pains and they prescribed me some crap I barely took and wound up throwing out. It was horrid. Then they prescribed me something less potent which was alright... but it has a bunch of side effects and I don't need it now. The mj helps me focus and be productive. Its often prescribed to help people with their sleep. I guess it must come with medical necessity. I am very particular about it.

I tried a few of the methods in this thread last night. The WBTB made me talk, and I caught myself saying something but I'm not sure what it was. I didn't remember any dreams. WBTB seems to be the easiest and most natural one i've read about so far, but that could be a preference. I tried my visualization videos in the bath but they helped for meditation and not dreaming. 

I am guessing you don't worry alot.  Everyone dreams...everyone...that's what happens in REM and we all experience that every time we go to sleep.

I have a bit of a different take on dreams though.  Our dreams are the way our Subconscious Mind communicates with the Conscious Mind.  When we sleep, our brain activity is very active.  Our brain is no longer affected by outside stimuli as when we are awake.  It performs sequences of Mental Health Analysis.  It isolates problem areas in our Conscious Awakened state.  Our subconscious mind chooses imagery to tell a story to our conscious mind.  By interpreting our dreams we can get a better idea of what those problem areas might be.

So, if we aren't remembering a lot of our dreams...it could be simply that we don't really have that many mental well being issues.  The primary one is fear.  So, if we don't worry that much, or if we are pretty content in our awakened lives, the dreams will not be remembered as vividly.  Or not at all.  

That being said.  The only times we remember our dreams, are when we actually wake up in the middle of a dream.  The dreams that 'wake us up'...those are the most important to analyze.  But if you don't remember dreaming much at all...I would say you have a pretty non-problematic state of mind.  That's a good thing.  Just my take on dreaming. 

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jmccr8
15 hours ago, joc said:

I am guessing you don't worry alot.  Everyone dreams...everyone...that's what happens in REM and we all experience that every time we go to sleep.

I have a bit of a different take on dreams though.  Our dreams are the way our Subconscious Mind communicates with the Conscious Mind.  When we sleep, our brain activity is very active.  Our brain is no longer affected by outside stimuli as when we are awake.  It performs sequences of Mental Health Analysis.  It isolates problem areas in our Conscious Awakened state.  Our subconscious mind chooses imagery to tell a story to our conscious mind.  By interpreting our dreams we can get a better idea of what those problem areas might be.

So, if we aren't remembering a lot of our dreams...it could be simply that we don't really have that many mental well being issues.  The primary one is fear.  So, if we don't worry that much, or if we are pretty content in our awakened lives, the dreams will not be remembered as vividly.  Or not at all.  

That being said.  The only times we remember our dreams, are when we actually wake up in the middle of a dream.  The dreams that 'wake us up'...those are the most important to analyze.  But if you don't remember dreaming much at all...I would say you have a pretty non-problematic state of mind.  That's a good thing.  Just my take on dreaming. 

Hi Joc

I think the context is somewhat broader and should consider all possibilities.

https://www.vice.com/en/article/qvdp8p/why-you-dont-dream-after-smoking-weed

You'd think getting blazed out of your mind would encourage crazy dreams, but the opposite is actually true. If fear is the mind-killer, as the stoner-classic novel Dune posits, then weed is the dream-killer. But when you stop smoking, your dreams may come back with a vengeance.

"On the few occasions that I don't go to sleep stoned, my dreams are super intense," says Rod*. "I always thought it had something to do with having used up all my mental imaging faculties being high."

jmccr8

 

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joc
3 minutes ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Joc

I think the context is somewhat broader and should consider all possibilities.

https://www.vice.com/en/article/qvdp8p/why-you-dont-dream-after-smoking-weed

You'd think getting blazed out of your mind would encourage crazy dreams, but the opposite is actually true. If fear is the mind-killer, as the stoner-classic novel Dune posits, then weed is the dream-killer. But when you stop smoking, your dreams may come back with a vengeance.

"On the few occasions that I don't go to sleep stoned, my dreams are super intense," says Rod*. "I always thought it had something to do with having used up all my mental imaging faculties being high."

jmccr8

 

Mmmmm...I'll stick with my original thought process.  I mean the post you stated even kind of says that.  "On the few occasions I don't go to sleep stoned, my dreams are super intense." says Rod.  

So let's think about that.  Rod goes to bed stoned most nights and has no dreams because the consensus is...weed is the dream killer.  Okay...let's think about the nights Rod doesn't go to bed stoned.   Which, by his own admission are few and far between.   Why doesn't Rod go to bed stoned?  I would suggest it is because...uh...he doesn't have any weed!   Being psychologically dependent on any drug is not a problem as long as the drug is immediately available.  But what a drag it would be to not have any weed man...and you keep calling and no one has any...and no one is at home ...and finally you just resign yourself to the fact that you are going to go to bed without getting high.   What a drag it is going to bed without catching a buzz first right?   So...then  you sleep and have lots of vivid dreams...and you remember them.  

Perhaps...it is because your subconscious mind has recognized a problem and is trying to communicate that through dreams.  Just a thought

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jmccr8
23 hours ago, joc said:

Mmmmm...I'll stick with my original thought process.  I mean the post you stated even kind of says that.  "On the few occasions I don't go to sleep stoned, my dreams are super intense." says Rod.  

So let's think about that.  Rod goes to bed stoned most nights and has no dreams because the consensus is...weed is the dream killer.  Okay...let's think about the nights Rod doesn't go to bed stoned.   Which, by his own admission are few and far between.   Why doesn't Rod go to bed stoned?  I would suggest it is because...uh...he doesn't have any weed!   Being psychologically dependent on any drug is not a problem as long as the drug is immediately available.  But what a drag it would be to not have any weed man...and you keep calling and no one has any...and no one is at home ...and finally you just resign yourself to the fact that you are going to go to bed without getting high.   What a drag it is going to bed without catching a buzz first right?   So...then  you sleep and have lots of vivid dreams...and you remember them.  

Perhaps...it is because your subconscious mind has recognized a problem and is trying to communicate that through dreams.  Just a thought

Hi Joc

I smoke, not every day  or even every week but I seldom have dreams but have seen several reports like the link I gave and just added it to the discussion as it may have that affect on some but not all people. 

jmccr8

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rashore

OK folks, knock it off with the drug references. 

2j. Drug references: Do not post content describing or advocating personal drug use. This includes vitamin mega dosing, human growth hormones, prescription drug abuse, white powder of gold, psychic experience inducing drugs or any other illegal or mind-altering substances.

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Mirzam
On 3/1/2021 at 8:12 AM, joc said:

I have a bit of a different take on dreams though.  Our dreams are the way our Subconscious Mind communicates with the Conscious Mind.  When we sleep, our brain activity is very active.  Our brain is no longer affected by outside stimuli as when we are awake.  It performs sequences of Mental Health Analysis.  It isolates problem areas in our Conscious Awakened state.  Our subconscious mind chooses imagery to tell a story to our conscious mind.  By interpreting our dreams we can get a better idea of what those problem areas might be.

So, if we aren't remembering a lot of our dreams...it could be simply that we don't really have that many mental well being issues.  The primary one is fear.  So, if we don't worry that much, or if we are pretty content in our awakened lives, the dreams will not be remembered as vividly.  Or not at all.  

There are definitely studies that agree with this, and I am not sure if you are referring to one, or if it's an interpretation from either personal experience, or both studies and personal experience. I remember reading back in 2012/2013 a psych book that said that the most popular take on dreams is that your mind is storing and analyzing memories in your sleep, and the experience is the chemical process of that.

This brings me back to the chemicals in your body concept. Every day we come in to contact with chemicals that we breathe in, touch (including hair and skin products and clothes), and consume (I don't abuse any of these or advocate for anyone to). 

I definitely agree that it explains mental health, but I think it also explains some physical and chemical aspects. Fear is tied to adrenaline and the release of cortisol, which can cause dreams in smaller doses and nightmares in larger doses. Fear can be induced from things we are both aware and unaware of, so it may be hard to unravel why people have negative dreams. 

In a somewhat related note, I realized that most of my (emphasis on the MY because everyone elses experiences are different) dreams used to be heavily influenced by the SSILD and SILD methods here.

https://luciddreamsociety.com/dream-induced-lucid-dreams/

Quote

9. SILD Technique (Subliminal Induction of Lucid Dreams)

 A recent technique that works by programming our mind to have more lucid dreams by watching videos with ”hidden” messages.

Subliminal messages are direct instructions given to our unconscious mind. This is a scientifically proven method.

Once I became more aware of how the media I consumed affected my mind, the methods I would prefer would be WBTB and a combination of binaural beats and SSILD.

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Mirzam
On 3/1/2021 at 11:36 PM, jmccr8 said:

I think the context is somewhat broader and should consider all possibilities.

https://www.vice.com/en/article/qvdp8p/why-you-dont-dream-after-smoking-weed

They didn't suggest any other possibilities, like eating a Mickey Mouse ice cream instead.

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Crazy Horse
On 2/22/2021 at 2:40 AM, smanthaonvaca said:

Throughout my life I've had periods of time where I would have vivid and lively dreams for nights on end. It won't last more then a few months. Then it will be a long period of time with little to no dreams, which are usually not vivid. I've found a connection to my dreams based on diet, exercise, consumption of movies, books, and music, and life circumstances.

Has anybody found that they can control their dreams by other means and help use them to shape their reality? Has lucid dreaming helped your creativity, relaxation, or physical condition? I find that having positive dreams can help me be more productive by day and improve exercise. Lately I haven't been able to control them as well.

Especially, has anyone used binaural beats, visual meditation, or a combination of visual meditation and soundscapes?

I have found myself struggling with some steps of escaping meditation where I fall asleep or meditate within my meditation and psyche myself out. I have found stairs, stretching, and running help me regain focus.

Not that long ago, I awoke at around 4:30 am and decided to meditate. Some time later I became very sleepy and decided to have a nap. But I also decided to listen to some theta wave binaural beats, and I had the most beautifully vivid dream. I wont bore you with all the details but it was at the ocean, with a beautiful light.. It wasn't quite lucid, but I was making decision within the dream. 

I have tried it since, but not with the same results..

What diet helps the most your vivid dreaming?

Or can you actually lucid dream?

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Professor T
11 hours ago, Crazy Horse said:

Not that long ago, I awoke at around 4:30 am and decided to meditate. Some time later I became very sleepy and decided to have a nap. But I also decided to listen to some theta wave binaural beats, and I had the most beautifully vivid dream. I wont bore you with all the details but it was at the ocean, with a beautiful light.. It wasn't quite lucid, but I was making decision within the dream. 

I have tried it since, but not with the same results..

What diet helps the most your vivid dreaming?

Or can you actually lucid dream?

Tada.. https://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/15-foods-that-enhance-your-dreams.html

Food rich in Tryptophan is best. My Preference is Chicken.  And what you inadvertently did by waking at 4:30AM was WBTB Wake Back to Bed, a pretty common Lucid dreaming Induction technique. It didn't work again because you got to mix it up..

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Crazy Horse
10 minutes ago, Professor T said:

Tada.. https://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/15-foods-that-enhance-your-dreams.html

Food rich in Tryptophan is best. My Preference is Chicken.  And what you inadvertently did by waking at 4:30AM was WBTB Wake Back to Bed, a pretty common Lucid dreaming Induction technique. It didn't work again because you got to mix it up..

Ok, thanks for the link..

Any other general tips?

Besides a dream journal, and meditation?

 

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Professor T
On 3/1/2021 at 4:38 PM, smanthaonvaca said:

Perhaps it is per my situation. I was having injury/muscle pains and they prescribed me some crap I barely took and wound up throwing out. It was horrid. Then they prescribed me something less potent which was alright... but it has a bunch of side effects and I don't need it now. The mj helps me focus and be productive. Its often prescribed to help people with their sleep. I guess it must come with medical necessity. I am very particular about it.

I tried a few of the methods in this thread last night. The WBTB made me talk, and I caught myself saying something but I'm not sure what it was. I didn't remember any dreams. WBTB seems to be the easiest and most natural one i've read about so far, but that could be a preference. I tried my visualization videos in the bath but they helped for meditation and not dreaming. 

Time and pressure will yield more results. Sometimes it works and you don't known why. Sometimes it's a drought. Sometime the tides are high. I've been practicing for years and I'm still barely scratching the surface. But I do dream every single night and quite often remember 3-5-7 dreams a night. I didn't get there by one or two techniques, it's by many of them in random order and applying time and pressure. 

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