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Can Arthurian legend be 'faithfully retold' ?


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They didn't even mention T.H. Whites The Once and Future King, a political satire published in 1958.

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Can Arthurian legend be 'faithfully retold' ?

Short answer: No.

And it doesn't matter. There's no such thing as a faithful or accurate retelling of any bit of myth/religion/folklore. At best you have consensus.

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1 hour ago, Seti42 said:

Can Arthurian legend be 'faithfully retold' ?

Short answer: No.

And it doesn't matter. There's no such thing as a faithful or accurate retelling of any bit of myth/religion/folklore. At best you have consensus.

That's a short, clear and real answer that can be used in numerous unexplained mysteries.

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1 hour ago, Seti42 said:

Short answer: No.

And it doesn't matter. There's no such thing as a faithful or accurate retelling of any bit of myth/religion/folklore. At best you have consensus.

Is there any way we can block Orestes from reading this post?

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Forget the old stuff, they should just make a trilogy of films based on Bernard Cornwell's Warlord Chronicles. Make it gritty like GOT and it'd be a smash. 

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I like Edison Marshall's "Pagan King" that de-romanticizes the legend.

See the source image

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5 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

They didn't even mention T.H. Whites The Once and Future King, a political satire published in 1958.

"Chances are that if you've read a version of the Arthur story today it is likely to be one of these Romances - most likely Thomas Malory's 15th-century Morte D'Arthur or an early 20th-century re-telling such as TH White's The Once and Future King. The tradition also proved very popular with the Victorians - especially with the Pre-Raphaelites, whose visual depictions of Arthurian legend frame the way we see the legend today"

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/22/2021 at 5:22 PM, Desertrat56 said:

They didn't even mention T.H. Whites The Once and Future King, a political satire published in 1958.

I so love that book! The Sword in the Stone is also a great read, and is lightly different from the trilogy.

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On 2/22/2021 at 10:53 PM, CloudSix said:

"Chances are that if you've read a version of the Arthur story today it is likely to be one of these Romances - most likely Thomas Malory's 15th-century Morte D'Arthur or an early 20th-century re-telling such as TH White's The Once and Future King. The tradition also proved very popular with the Victorians - especially with the Pre-Raphaelites, whose visual depictions of Arthurian legend frame the way we see the legend today"

 

Well spotted!  (Though it was hardly hidden in the small print, was it)

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