Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
UM-Bot

Can Arthurian legend be 'faithfully retold' ?

Recommended Posts

 
Desertrat56

They didn't even mention T.H. Whites The Once and Future King, a political satire published in 1958.

  • Like 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Seti42

Can Arthurian legend be 'faithfully retold' ?

Short answer: No.

And it doesn't matter. There's no such thing as a faithful or accurate retelling of any bit of myth/religion/folklore. At best you have consensus.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jon the frog
1 hour ago, Seti42 said:

Can Arthurian legend be 'faithfully retold' ?

Short answer: No.

And it doesn't matter. There's no such thing as a faithful or accurate retelling of any bit of myth/religion/folklore. At best you have consensus.

That's a short, clear and real answer that can be used in numerous unexplained mysteries.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom1200
1 hour ago, Seti42 said:

Short answer: No.

And it doesn't matter. There's no such thing as a faithful or accurate retelling of any bit of myth/religion/folklore. At best you have consensus.

Is there any way we can block Orestes from reading this post?

  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Otten

Forget the old stuff, they should just make a trilogy of films based on Bernard Cornwell's Warlord Chronicles. Make it gritty like GOT and it'd be a smash. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammerclaw

I like Edison Marshall's "Pagan King" that de-romanticizes the legend.

See the source image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CloudSix
5 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

They didn't even mention T.H. Whites The Once and Future King, a political satire published in 1958.

"Chances are that if you've read a version of the Arthur story today it is likely to be one of these Romances - most likely Thomas Malory's 15th-century Morte D'Arthur or an early 20th-century re-telling such as TH White's The Once and Future King. The tradition also proved very popular with the Victorians - especially with the Pre-Raphaelites, whose visual depictions of Arthurian legend frame the way we see the legend today"

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.