Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Manwon Lender

What is the oldest Written Language

Recommended Posts

Manwon Lender

I have always assumed that Sumerian was the oldest written language, is this correct of are there other written languages that should be considered?

https://www.britannica.com/topic/Sumerian-language

Edited by Manwon Lender
Added word
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Gingitsune

It seems linear Elamite is about as old. 

https://www.mccourier.com/this-frenchman-manages-to-decipher-a-script-that-is-more-than-4000-years-old-and-to-question-the-invention-of-writing/

It's hard to tell for sure, the earliest known writing of any given civilization is not necessarily the oldest ever to have been produced. But it seems the odds are for Sumer, Elam and Egypt, in that order.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jaylemurph

It depends on which language family you’re talking about — Indo-European, Semitic, Etc. 

The first IE written language was cuneiform Hittite. 

—Jaylemurph 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Manwon Lender
1 hour ago, jaylemurph said:

It depends on which language family you’re talking about — Indo-European, Semitic, Etc. 

The first IE written language was cuneiform Hittite. 

—Jaylemurph 

What is the difference between cuneiform Sumarian and cuneiform Hittite? 

I was under the impression that the Sumarians invented cuneiform text, or are the Sumarians and Hittites from the same language family?

It appears that many groups in Mesopotamia adapted cuneiforms use as a writing system for their languages.

Thanks for your reply.

Edited by Manwon Lender

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jaylemurph

There's a difference between languages and the formats used to write them (Persian, for example, is one language but could be written with both cuneiform and non-cuneiform writing) -- just like you can write Korean in the Latin alphabet. The Hittite is a different language from Sumerian but could still use the cuneiform writing system to be encoded, just like the Akkadian and Babylon languages also used cuneiform writing without even being in the same language family.

Egyptian also had a non-hieroglyphic form called demotic. Even Latin used to be written with another alphabet, the Old Italic one, before it developed this alphabet.

EDIT: There is no difference between the writing for Hittite and Sumerian -- just like you can write English and French with the same letters!

--Jaylemurph

Edited by jaylemurph
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Manwon Lender
1 hour ago, jaylemurph said:

There's a difference between languages and the formats used to write them (Persian, for example, is one language but could be written with both cuneiform and non-cuneiform writing) -- just like you can write Korean in the Latin alphabet. The Hittite is a different language from Sumerian but could still use the cuneiform writing system to be encoded, just like the Akkadian and Babylon languages also used cuneiform writing without even being in the same language family.

Egyptian also had a non-hieroglyphic form called demotic. Even Latin used to be written with another alphabet, the Old Italic one, before it developed this alphabet.

EDIT: There is no difference between the writing for Hittite and Sumerian -- just like you can write English and French with the same letters!

--Jaylemurph

Thanks for the information, but all the information I have been able to find says that the Sumarians invented cuneiform.

If that is true, how could Hittite cuneiform be the first written language?

So far all I could find is that Hittite cuneiform was the first written Indo-European language.

https://omniglot.com/writing/hittite.htm

This is what is confusing me on this subject, were the Hittites part of the Sumarian Culture?

https://sites.utexas.edu/dsb/tokens/the-evolution-of-writing/

Edited by Manwon Lender

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Abramelin

No, the Hittites only adopted cuneiform writing. Maybe they found it to be more practical? They had invented their own hieroglyphs, but apparently dropped those for cuneiform letters.

Here the Hittite hieroglyphs:

 

hittite_hieroglyphs_by_louboumian_d1h0ch1-pre.jpg

Edited by Abramelin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jaylemurph
10 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

So far all I could find is that Hittite cuneiform was the first written Indo-European language.

Which is exactly what I wrote above!

—Jaylemurph

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.