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Gulf Stream is weakest it's been in 1,000 yrs

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Jon the frog
On 2/27/2021 at 12:53 PM, Tatetopa said:

Study that carefully.  Weather patterns that change will also affect rainfall in both directions   Being in a warm desert may not be too good either.

I wonder if there is data available that predicts geographic habitability under different conditions.  It would be a best seller.  No doubt the military has already studied it..  

Having a second choice is better than having none... chosing carefully is a must tho.

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Tatetopa
17 hours ago, joc said:

How do you study something like the Gulf Stream that happened 1000 years ago?  Either by what someone back then studied...or your own supposition of the past which is primarily guess work and primarily...guess work is just that.  I doubt 1000 years ago anyone was studying the Gulf Stream or even knew what that was.

Where are you @ChrLzs?

He must be busy.

The gulf stream has been important to Atlantic navigation since people have been sailing and rowing through open water.   My ancestors were exploring and discovering new lands 1000 years ago. They were aware of currents, fish, whales, marine mammals  and bird populations that they depended on.  They may not have called it the Gulf Stream,  but they were not stupid.    They knew when subsistence became more difficult on the Faroes, and Shetland. It was changing climate that finally destroyed the grass and dairy industry on Greenland and contributed to the failure of the colony.  Five hundred or so years ago it was the moving current that caused ships to sail  further south when going west and use the northern route as a way home.  Captains kept logs of current, wind speed, ship's progress.  Easier to spot the trends in current and wind when your are moving on sail power and your crossing is in tens of days. 

Now if you want to get into science, you can look at marine deposits and composition of silts and near shore sediments and traces left by marine life.  Plenty of ways to find out what was going on.

 

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joc
1 hour ago, Tatetopa said:

He must be busy.

The gulf stream has been important to Atlantic navigation since people have been sailing and rowing through open water.   My ancestors were exploring and discovering new lands 1000 years ago. They were aware of currents, fish, whales, marine mammals  and bird populations that they depended on.  They may not have called it the Gulf Stream,  but they were not stupid.    They knew when subsistence became more difficult on the Faroes, and Shetland. It was changing climate that finally destroyed the grass and dairy industry on Greenland and contributed to the failure of the colony.  Five hundred or so years ago it was the moving current that caused ships to sail  further south when going west and use the northern route as a way home.  Captains kept logs of current, wind speed, ship's progress.  Easier to spot the trends in current and wind when your are moving on sail power and your crossing is in tens of days. 

Now if you want to get into science, you can look at marine deposits and composition of silts and near shore sediments and traces left by marine life.  Plenty of ways to find out what was going on.

 

I'm really looking forward to seeing the chart showing the speed of current for every year since 1121.  That will be super awesome!

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joc

 

Quote

To find out whether this is truly the case, Eirik Vinje Galaasen, a paleoclimatologist at the University of Bergen, and his colleagues examined a 250-meter-long core of seafloor clay previously drilled off the southern tip of Greenland, at a spot known to capture sediments pulled down by plunging surface waters. Throughout the layers of dirt, representing 500,000 years of history, were the tiny shells of single-celled organisms known as foraminifera. Galaasen and colleagues flushed the foraminifera fossils from the different layers of mud and analyzed their chemistry to see what they said about the Atlantic circulation. “It was a stupid amount of work, years in the lab, to dig through mud at this level of detail,” he says.

 

So, I read the article...and much to my dismay...no mention of Manmade Global Warming.   So, I will say, okay...I just figured since the Climate Hawks politicize everything else that they were behind this as well.  It was interesting to note that the article said that ancient climate change had affected the currents as well.

There you go.  No need for Chuck to come after all.  Besides he would just say....You are commenting about an article you didn't even read!  :devil:

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Tatetopa
1 hour ago, joc said:

I'm really looking forward to seeing the chart showing the speed of current for every year since 1121.  That will be super awesome!

Get serious.  . People that study maritime records  are going to get relative  data and measurements developed at the time.    That may never be good enough for you.  Do your job, feed your family, don't worry about it.  It won't affect your life.  

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keithisco
On 2/27/2021 at 4:21 PM, Buzz_Light_Year said:

Actually there is and even farther back.

Stalagmites taken from a Blue Hole record climate change that correspond to ice core samples.

National Geographic Video on Blue Holes. I started the video towards the last portion that explains this.

 

Relates toa very specific area. It does not relate to a Global System

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Buzz_Light_Year
10 minutes ago, keithisco said:

Relates toa very specific area. It does not relate to a Global System

The video states that the stalagmite ring findings are corroborated by ice core samples.

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keithisco
20 hours ago, Buzz_Light_Year said:

The video states that the stalagmite ring findings are corroborated by ice core samples.

Would not the stalagmite rings need to taken in proximity to the ice-core (or do you mean mud-core) samples to be verifiable?

Does any of this relate to man-made Global Warming affecting the Gulf Stream

Just asking. 

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Buzz_Light_Year
10 minutes ago, keithisco said:

Would not the stalagmite rings need to taken in proximity to the ice-core (or do you mean mud-core) samples to be verifiable?

Does any of this relate to man-made Global Warming affecting the Gulf Stream

Just asking. 

The video says that the rings in the stalagmites correspond to climate changes that are seen in ice core samples.

Man-made global warming? Well let's see 5 climate changes in 80,000 years or an average of 1 every 16,000 years. Seems to me that other mechanisms are at work here.

If you have issues with the information in the video then I suggest you contact National Geographic.

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