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Still Waters

lack of oxygen will wipe out life on Earth

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Still Waters

Earth will not be able to support and sustain life forever. Our oxygen-rich atmosphere may only last another billion years, according to a new study in Nature Geoscience.

As our Sun ages, it is becoming more luminous, meaning that in the future Earth will receive more solar energy. This increased energy will affect the surface of the planet, speeding up the weathering of silicate rocks such as basalt and granite. When these rocks weather the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide is pulled out of the atmosphere and through chemical reactions locked in carbonate minerals. In theory, the Earth should start to cool down as carbon dioxide levels fall, but in around 2 billion years this effect will be negated by the ever-harshening glare of the Sun.

https://theconversation.com/a-billion-years-from-now-a-lack-of-oxygen-will-wipe-out-life-on-earth-156241

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thedutchiedutch
Posted (edited)

Not overly concerned yet lol. A lot can happen in around 2 billion years from now :)

Edited by thedutchiedutch

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Nuclear Wessel

Technology that will exist at that point will prevent that from happening.

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Xeno-Fish
19 minutes ago, Nuclear Wessel said:

Technology that will exist at that point will prevent that from happening.

If we ever successfully master space travel, I doubt we'll even need too. 

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